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Author Topic: What is an EDS degree?  (Read 26930 times)
Anonymous
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« on: March 05, 2005, 2:22:48 am »

What is an EDS degree? Is it worth pursuing? How widely recognized is it in academia?

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Jimster
Guest
« Reply #1 on: March 05, 2005, 3:01:37 am »


It is a "specialist" degree, as I understand between a masters and a doctorate.  Another in-betweener is CAGS -- certificate in advanced graduate studies.

Personal opinion, if you have to keep explaining what your degree is to people, it is less valuable from a purely perception point of view.
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ed prof
Guest
« Reply #2 on: March 05, 2005, 5:01:18 am »

It is common in colleges of education. I often see classroom teachers get these degrees to get a pay bonus (especially those who have no desire to get a doctorate but want to learn more in a particular field or already have the MA or MS and want to add certification-- an example is the area of reading because of NCLB).

At some institutions you can use EdS courses towards the EdD or PhD. If you want to teach in higher education, I don't recommend the EdS route unless you have time and money to spare. Go for the doctorate instead.

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Dale
Guest
« Reply #3 on: March 05, 2005, 2:29:10 pm »

I've seen the EdS used for teachers who want to become principals.  I would suppose this makes them more desireable than those with MA/MS degrees, but less than EdD, and even less than PhD candidates.
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Student with EdD Relatives
Guest
« Reply #4 on: March 05, 2005, 3:19:21 pm »

I thought you need an EdD to be a school prinicipal. At least around here you do.
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Dale
Guest
« Reply #5 on: March 06, 2005, 7:08:12 am »

My experience comes from my time in one of the Dakotas doing a prolonged internship.  Several of the students that shared residence hall space were completing their EdS work there.  I would venture to say that requirements vary by state.
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Experienced
Guest
« Reply #6 on: March 06, 2005, 9:31:18 am »


In my state, principals and superintendents must complete a certificate program which is roughly equivalent to the coursework for an EdD. Many then do continue to take the prelims and write a dissertation -- I know this only because their appeal for an extension of time to complete a doctoral degree comes to a subcommittee of the graduate board on which I sit. If they have a decent GPA in courses and the support of a potential supervisor, the extension is granted -- and the time to degree is often very very long, since many of these people are by then employed as principals and using some aspect of their experience as fodder for their dissertation research.
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John Garner
Guest
« Reply #7 on: March 07, 2005, 6:31:29 am »

Hello,

An EdS degree, at least in Indiana, allows those with a the required years of experience in a Public K-12 school setting to get the appropriate Indiana state license to be a Principal, Administator or Superintendent.

It is possible to get such a position with a temporary license, but you are limited by Indiana law regarding your experience to be in certain positions of responsibility without appropriate supervision.

As was mentioned previously, these rules vary greatly from state to state. They exist to protect the public interest, as the vast majority of local property taxes in most areas go to support the local public schools. Those who manage these systems are usually called Superintendents and are hired by an elected or appointed school board.

I hope that this helps.
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Anon
Guest
« Reply #8 on: March 08, 2005, 7:16:33 am »

The EDS degree seems just another way for universities to obtain money from unaware or uninformed educators. If it is necessary to explain the degree to hiring personnel, then the degree is "unrecognized." It is similar to a degree from a diploma mill.
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traveller
Guest
« Reply #9 on: March 08, 2005, 7:21:12 am »

To become a principal in my school division one needs at least a Masters degree and to have been a vice principal for a certain number of years. I know one person who was a principal and got his doctorate. he wanted to stay on as a principal but it became very difficult after he got his doctorate because staff and the board started wondering why he was staying on, assuming that doctorate meant he wanted to teach in university, which he didnt!
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Ed
Guest
« Reply #10 on: March 08, 2005, 12:53:16 pm »

from Job-Seeking Experiences forum
Author: John Ed

I have basically found an Ed.S. degree unrecognized. It seems worthless for employment purposes. Some employers do not know what it is. In fact, I have met some human resources personnel unaware of the requirements for an Ed.S. degree. I have had to explain what it is too many times. My salary and benefits have been based on my master's degree. An Ed.S. degree seems unrecognized and worthless.
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moom
Guest
« Reply #11 on: March 08, 2005, 1:35:16 pm »

I certainly had never heard of it till it was raised here. What does the S stand for?
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helpful
Guest
« Reply #12 on: March 08, 2005, 4:21:51 pm »

Science?
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Dale
Guest
« Reply #13 on: March 09, 2005, 4:54:17 am »

The S stands for Specialist.  This degree falls between the Masters and Doctorate, as has been mentioned.
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isabel
Guest
« Reply #14 on: March 10, 2005, 6:50:00 am »

Specialist in Education.  It is pretty widely recognized in the K12 community as the step past an MA, but short of a PhD.  In my state, principals are required to have an MA, some go on to the EdS, and those who want to go on to superintendent seek an EdD or PhD.  I have a brother who has been a principal for years with his MA, and will be pursuing his PhD this fall in order to step up to a superintendent position.  My father went as far as his EdS while he was a principal.  I think the misunderstandings about what an EdS is must be coming from the higher education community, who do not use this degree much.  It is very valuable in the K12 community, who often use education beyond the MA to determine pay scale and advancement opportunities.
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