Old, Boring, White, and Mean: How Professors Appear on the Small Screen

Old, Boring, White, and Mean: How Professors Appear on the Small Screen 1

Scott Humbert, ABC, Getty Images

They may be fictional characters, but TV shows' images of professors may have a big effect on real-life students, one researcher suggests. In the show "Boy Meets World," for example, an old-school instructor refuses to call students by anything but their surnames, an intimidating approach to a first-generation student.

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Scott Humbert, ABC, Getty Images

They may be fictional characters, but TV shows' images of professors may have a big effect on real-life students, one researcher suggests. In the show "Boy Meets World," for example, an old-school instructor refuses to call students by anything but their surnames, an intimidating approach to a first-generation student.

Señor Ben Chang taught a Spanish course on the television show Community in which he called his students "morons." George Feeny, a quintessential old-school teacher and professor on Boy Meets World, refused to call his students by anything other than their last names. Maggie Walsh, a tough psychology professor on Buffy the Vampire Slayer, made herself even more intimidating by sending a couple of demons to kill a student.

They may be fictional