August 17, 2015

The Almanac of Higher Education 2015-16

In this year's Almanac, Chronicle reporters bring context to the data by asking why the numbers appear as they do. Why do colleges seem to be hiring more presidents from nontraditional backgrounds? How did a few small colleges end up with such big endowments? Read the articles online and then turn to your print copy or order the digital edition to see all the data.


Universities in areas like Silicon Valley may pay a premium in faculty salaries, but less-prestigious institutions in the same areas often do not.

One university in Texas figured out how to grow: by raising admissions standards to make students feel proud to attend.

Some public institutions that have learned to make do with less are welcoming new state money, while some private institutions have grown wealthier through private largess.

In some states, nearly all college students attend public institutions, but in others, the tradition of private education is strong.