The Journal That Couldn't Stop Citing Itself  

A criminology journal’s meteoric rise in impact factor seemed like a Cinderella story. But a researcher now demonstrates how easy it is for publications to pump up their own citation stats.


Ever Wondered What Thomas Pynchon Thinks About Accreditation?

Of course you haven’t. But Cow Country — a newish novel that one critic thought was secretly written by the famous author — takes on the subject.



New Leaders Bring Marketing Chops to University Presses  

Most directors used to come from the editorial ranks. No longer, as survive-and-thrive skills are ever more crucial.



Librarians Leap to the Aid of Researchers Whose Funding Will Soon Depend on Open Access  

Federal agencies are putting new rules into effect this fall, with hundreds of millions of dollars at stake.


Universities Yelp as Elsevier Pulls Back on Free Access  

As more institutions create repositories of their own researchers’ work, the publisher is telling them they must respect waiting periods before allowing free access to Elsevier-owned content.


‘Charlie Hebdo’ Massacre Prompts New Criticism of 2009 Episode at Yale

The university’s press riled advocates of academic freedom by removing cartoons of Muhammad from a scholarly book.



MIT Press and a Rebellious Journal Will Part Ways  

The deal The Baffler struck with the press in 2011 helped keep the publication alive. Now the journal has negotiated an exit.


Publishers Win Reversal of Court Ruling That Favored ‘E-Reserves’ at Georgia State U.

An appeals court said an earlier decision had misapplied fair-use standards in finding that the university did not violate copyright law.



Arab-Studies E-Zine Hopes to Counter Mainstream Narrative  

The multilingual, multidisciplinary journal Jadaliyya covers the region "from an inside-out perspective."


Anatomy of a Serial-Plagiarism Charge

A UNLV professor's large body of work contains some striking—and odd—examples of misattribution. Here's a short guide to a few of them.


Details of Energy Dept. Plan to Ease Access to Research Don't Please All  

The announcement marks a new, pragmatic phase in the debate over how widely published research should be shared, and how quickly.



Around Retail Giant Amazon, University Presses Tiptoe and Whisper  

Scholarly publishers are trying to take advantage of the retail giant’s strength without being swept away by it.


New Alliance Aims to Answer Authors' Questions About Rights  

The group’s goal is to develop a positive agenda around copyright, says one of its founders, and to arm writers with information to help them make decisions.


Nature Publishing Group Requires Faculty Authors to Waive ‘Moral Rights’

A scholarly-publication official at Duke University says the stipulation attacks "core academic values," but the publisher says he’s overreacting.


Dispute Over Who Will Publish an Academic Journal Goes to Court  

The Social Science History Association wants to shop for a new publisher of its journal. But a phrase in its contract with Duke University may stand in the way.


Librarians Accuse Harvard Business Publishing of Unfair Prices  

As the publisher of "Harvard Business Review" pursues revenue from course assignments, some complain of profiteering.



Memoirist of '12 Years a Slave' Is Subject of New Biography  

A librarian, a scholar of government, and a museum curator joined forces to write the life story of Solomon Northup.


National Book Awards Finalists, 2013

Academics are among the finalists announced on Wednesday for the annual prizes.



Open-Access Movement Makes Inroads Beyond Science  

A conference this summer examined what an open-access publishing program for the humanities would look like, and some publishers are already exploring that option.


Publisher's Bankruptcy Filing Comes as Market for Print Textbooks Shrinks

Print textbooks still have a place, says Cengage Learning's chief executive. But as the company restructures, its focus will shift more toward digital products.