MOOC Madness

An inside look at the latest phenomenon in online learning. In this special report, we look at the hype, the hope, and the details—and offer the voices of the pioneers, converts, skeptics, and the undecided.

Mad About MOOC's

Mad About MOOC's

Brave New World

Will massive open online courses save higher education, or endarger it?

Engaging the Planet

5 ways edX could change education.

Case Studies

Four professors take four different approaches to MOOC's.

1.3 Million Students and Counting

Andrew Ng, co-founder of Coursera, discusses its culture of innovation.

Giving a MOOC a Try

Ann Kirschner, an online pioneer, takes one of the new mega-courses.

MOOC's and Middle America

Greg Graham worries that average students won't get the face-to-face contact they need.

The Virtual Classroom

The Virtual Classroom

The Economics of Online Education

A virtual degree program has been very good for the business school at UMass.

Trending in China

Some free online courses have developed huge followings abroad.

Phoenix Rising

After enrolling in an online course, Catharine R. Stimpson's suspicion of a digital future runs "deeper than ever".

A Convert's Tale

Glenn A. Hartz explains why he changed his mind about teaching online.

Ethics Go Online

Thomas P. Seager and Evan Selinger conduct a cross-country teaching experiment.

The Virtual Classroom

Opinion

Surfing the Digital Wave

Rick Ostrander, a Christian-college provost, prepares for the tsunami.

Tales From Texas

Mark David Milliron reflects on his first year as a chancellor of the new, online WGU Texas.

Goodbye, Classroom

Kenneth A. Connor may never teach behind a podium again, but he's having a blast.

Improving the Student Experience

Holly A. Bell imagines the possibilities for online teaching if more senior professor get on board.

E-books and the Environment

Thomas F. Gattiker and Scott E. Lowe wondered if using e-textbooks could help cut carbon emissions, and were surprised by their findings.

Social Media for Scientists

David Siegfried and Allyson Fauver offer advice from science programs that are successfully blogging, tweeting, and friending.