Why Does Violent Hazing Plague Asian-American Fraternities?

The answer isn’t as simple as ugly tradition, experts say. Cultural factors also influence the rituals of groups that struggle against challenges and stereotypes.



The Week  

What you need to know about the past seven days.



After Killings in Oregon, Colleges Face Threats — and Take No Chances

This past week several campuses learned of online posts or bathroom-wall graffiti that threatened violence. Almost all of them went on high alert.



Missed Classes, a Changed Grade, and One Disillusioned Adviser  

Two years ago, Will Collier landed his dream job, overseeing academic services for one of the country's premier programs. His experience illustrates the challenge of protecting academic integrity in big-time college sports.


Chronicle Awards Prize to Versatile Reporter With Accessible Writing

Rebecca Koenig will receive the David W. Miller Award, which honors a reporter killed 13 years ago by a drunken driver.


Why a Certain $21 Million Is Worth Much More to the U. of Phoenix

For now, the university is barred from enrolling active-duty military personnel under a Department of Defense program. The loss of that ability, and the money that comes with it, could have an outsize impact.



How Fafsa’s New Reliance on Older Tax Data Could Affect Colleges  

The chance to apply for aid earlier, using so-called prior-prior-year tax records, is widely seen as a win for students, but much will depend on how colleges and states respond.


Admissions & Student Aid

When a Small-College Scholar Wins a Nobel, the Marketing Begins

Seizing an opportunity that won’t come often, Drew University has made William Campbell, who won the Nobel Prize in Medicine on Monday, the focus of a broad-ranging marketing campaign.


Thanks, Amazon. Campus Mailrooms Struggle to Keep Up With Boom in Packages for Students

The influx is fueled not by care packages from Mom, but by a surge in online shopping — for textbooks, Halloween costumes, Valentine sweets, dormitory décor, even mini-fridges.



As Federal Investigations of Sex Assault Get Tougher, Some Ask if That’s Progress  

Colleges’ latest settlements with the Education Department’s Office for Civil Rights divide opinions: greater protection for students or automatic indictment of institutions?


Students Who Feel Emotionally Unprepared for College Struggle in the Classroom

Stress outside the lecture hall tends to result in lower grades for freshmen, along with a range of other negative experiences, according to survey results released on Thursday.



Colleges Are Accused of Withholding Public Records on the Role of Race in Admissions  

A brief filed in the closely watched Fisher v. Texas case says universities are becoming "steadily less transparent" when faced with open-records requests. Many institutions beg to differ.



A Faculty’s Stand on Trigger Warnings Stirs Fears Among Students  

Even as it draws praise for shielding academic freedom, the skeptical stance taken by American University professors is also being denounced for potentially undermining students who are psychologically vulnerable.


Leadership & Governance

The Attorney General Who Wants to Keep Private Colleges on Course  

Eric T. Schneiderman, New York’s top law-enforcement officer, took an activist role in forcing the struggling Cooper Union to submit to state oversight. His office plans to steer other institutions away from trouble, too.


Research Raises Questions About Colleges That Shift From For-Profit to Nonprofit

Four higher-education companies converted to nonprofit status but now act like "covert for-profits," a report says.



5 Things Colleges Should Know About the New Secretary of Education

John B. King Jr., who will take over for Arne Duncan in December, isn’t well known in higher-ed circles. But his track record offers some clues about how he will lead the Education Department.

Admissions & Student Aid

Coalition’s Plans for New Application Platform Stir Debate

Admissions officers and college counselors got a description of the new site over the weekend — and a chance to critique it.

Admissions & Student Aid

Researcher's Goal: An Admissions Process That Rewards 'Ethical Character'

The project grew from the worry that many teens are too focused on their own success and that colleges are contributing to that problem.



Tough on Colleges, Arne Duncan Bequeaths Record of Advocacy for Students

Assessments of the education secretary’s seven-year tenure credit him with changing the culture of the department to one of accountability and transparency.

Admissions & Student Aid

Where Else Are You Applying? Colleges Can't Ask Applicants Much Longer

New ethical guidelines approved by the National Association for College Admission Counseling forbid the question, which dozens of colleges currently use to help them predict who will enroll.