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Administration

Why Do So Many College Presidents Call Their Campuses a ‘Family’?

The Baylor Family. The Ole Miss family. The Rutgers family. When leaders want to convey a sense of community, experts say, they often resort to this well-worn metaphor.

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Leadership & Governance

Video: Damming Student Debt: One Liberal-Arts College’s Approach

Sheila Bair, president of Washington College, in Maryland, says it’s been too easy for colleges to raise tuition because it’s been too easy for students to borrow money, and that has created a drag on the economy.

 

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Leadership & Governance

The Slow-Motion Downfall of Linda Katehi

With her job on the line and Janet Napolitano on the case, the University of California at Davis’s chancellor can’t resist a fight.

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Admissions & Student Aid

The Enrollment Manager as Bogeyman

In the eyes of their many critics, they are faceless, pragmatic technocrats with too much power. But it’s worth imagining what higher education would look like without enrollment managers playing a critical role.

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Leadership & Governance

The Katehi Years at UC-Davis

The years since Linda P.B. Katehi became chancellor of the University of California at Davis, in 2009, have been marked by controversy and conflict. Here's a look at her record.

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Government

How Clinton’s ‘Free College’ Could Cause a Cascade of Problems

The Democratic nominee’s proposal might sound great, but it could close many colleges, pressure some flagships, and disappoint students.

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Administration

A University Makes a Rare Call to Ditch Its Title IX Exemption

Since 1985, Pepperdine University has been exempt from certain provisions of Title IX. But early this year it decided to waive that status. It’s not clear what prompted the shift.

Students

Apply for The Chronicle's Spring Internships

Are you an early-career journalist? We want you to apply for our paid internships. Here's how.

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Government

‘Stereotypes Are at the Center’: a White House Official on Why Native Students Often Struggle

William Mendoza, director of the Initiative on American Indian and Alaska Native Education, had several false starts before completing college. He discusses how tribal colleges helped him find his way, and why they remain relevant to students today.

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Students

For Native Students, Education’s Promise Has Long Been Broken

President Obama wants more American Indian students to graduate from college. But look at the challenges these high schoolers face, and it becomes clear why that is a tall order.

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Students

Leaving the Reservation

As she prepares to graduate from high school, Charnelle Bear Medicine contemplates her future at the University of Montana. A photo essay details the final weeks of her senior year.

Students

For Native Students, a Deepening Divide

Data show that the achievement gap between Native American students and their peers starts young and persists through college.

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Students

‘I Want to Get This Right’: Scenes From a Conference on Campus Sex Assault

When officials from 33 colleges met in Washington to discuss a new curriculum for assault investigations, conducting fair interviews and making sense of consent emerged as key themes.

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Students

What a University Can Learn From Wegmans

American University hopes to translate the customer-service ethos developed by the successful grocery chain into better student-service policies.

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Administration

1999: Opening Lab Doors to Women

When a faculty-led study showed MIT that it was discriminating against women, the university did something unusual: It agreed.

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Students

As Dual Enrollments Swell, So Do Worries About Academic Rigor

Courses that give high-school students college credit before they graduate are expanding rapidly. In Texas, where the idea is especially popular, many educators are watching the trend warily.

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Students

How Alabama Is Trying to Diversify Its Greek Organizations

This month the university released an "action plan" that seeks to promote inclusiveness within its traditionally white fraternities and sororities. But concerns remain about the possibility of lasting change.

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Students

When Pokémon Goes to Campus: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly

The hit augmented-reality game has prompted many colleges to jump on the bandwagon. Sometimes, though, players are finding themselves in unusual situations.

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Admissions & Student Aid

Behind the Shake-Up at Temple U.: A Merit Scholarship That Grew Too Fast

Though no administrators have taken the blame for the $22-million deficit that led to the president’s resignation, it’s clear that a financial-aid program had become too successful for its own good.

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Administration

U. of Cincinnati Grapples With the Legacy of a Black Man Killed by Its Police

The shooting of Samuel DuBose forced university leaders to ask basic questions about their private police force. The answers were not pretty.

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Administration

Bonuses Push More Public-College Leaders Past $1 Million

Five presidents hit that mark in 2015, and three of them were in Texas, according to The Chronicle's annual analysis of compensation at the top.

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Leadership & Governance

Why an HBCU Leader Felt Compelled to Speak Out on Race and Policing

John Silvanus Wilson Jr., president of Morehouse College, wrote a widely cited essay for The Huffington Post about an incident in which he was stopped by the police "for no apparent reason." He hopes his experience is instructive to a new generation of black men.

Government

Disturbed by Protests, State Lawmakers Appoint a Panel to Audit the U. of Missouri

The Missouri legislature has put together a commission to recommend changes in the state-university system. Nothing is off limits.

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Students

How ‘Campus Carry’ Will Change the Way Texas Students Live Their Lives

A law that allows people with concealed-weapons licenses to carry their guns on college campuses will have effects that reverberate beyond the classroom.