What We Do at ProfHacker

Monday through Friday, ProfHacker delivers tips, tutorials, and commentary on pedagogy, productivity, and technology in higher education. For more information, including our origin story and some tips for using ProfHacker, please see our original project launch announcement.

Read on for more information about our editors, authors, content categories, ways to contribute content, and our commenting policy and community guidelines. If you're just looking for a contact address, please use ProfHackerCHE@gmail.com.


Editors

George H. Williams is an assistant professor of English at the University of South Carolina Upstate. He wears many hats: teacher, scholar, volunteer, would-be hacker, indie enthusiast, nonprofit advocate, word herder, and world traveler. His research interests include eighteenth-century studies, disability studies, book history, and the digital humanities. In addition to maintaining his web site and writing his blog WorkBook, George serves as managing editor of Teaching Carnival, is working to launch EighteenthCentury.org, and is an occasional contributor to The Long 18th. His current research can be found at Look, Listen, Touch, a project exploring best practices in applying universal design principles to digital humanities projects. Other places you can find him include Twitter, Flickr, Delicious, and Zotero.org. The best way to reach him is via Gmail: George.H.Williams@gmail.com.

Jason B. Jones is an associate professor of English at Central Connecticut State University. His research interests include Victorian literature, psychoanalysis, and the digital humanities; his book, Lost Causes: Historical Consciousness in Victorian Literature, was published by Ohio State UP in 2006. He is also president of the CCSU-AAUP faculty union. Online, Jason is a core contributor at Wired.com's GeekDad blog and a regular writer at the Blog of a Bookslut. He's @jbj on Twitter and Flickr.

Send an e-mail to the ProfHacker editors at ProfHackerCHE@gmail.com for general questions or if you're interested in writing for us.


Authors

Adeline Koh is a visiting faculty fellow at Duke University (2012-2013), and assistant professor of literature at Richard Stockton College. Her research focuses on race and gender within postcolonial studies and the digital humanities. She runs The Stockton Postcolonial Studies Project and Digitizing Chinese Englishmen. Find out more about her work here: http//adelinekoh.org.

Anastasia Salter is an assistant professor of Information Arts and Technologies at the University of Baltimore. Her primary research is on digital narratives with a continuing focus on virtual worlds, gender and cyberspace, video games, educational games and fan production. She holds a Doctorate in Communications Design from the University of Baltimore and an MFA in Children's Literature at Hollins University. She writes a column speculating on the future of technology and pop culture for CinCity2000, Future Fragments. She's on Twitter as @AnaSalter and online at Selfloud.net

Alex M. Jarvis is an Undergraduate student at Central Connecticut State University. He has a special studies (read: made-up) Major in the Digital Humanities. He is a fan (and amateur practitioner) of Nerdcore Rap, operates a podcast, and is an avid Comic Book Fan. He is currently working on finishing his degree, learning several programming languages, writing a few amateur comic books, and a project to galvanize local geek culture called Metaga.me. He maintains a web site, but other places you can find him include Twitter, Flickr, Facebook, and Delicious.

Amy Cavender is a member of the Congregation of the Sisters of the Holy Cross and an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Saint Mary's College, where she teaches both introductory and upper-level courses in Political Thought, as well as courses in Religion and Politics and Human Rights. Her current research interests are in ecumenical dialogue and the lessons it might provide for the conduct of political discourse in pluralistic societies. Amy has been a lover of all things technical since her first introduction to the Commodore PET when she was in grade school. She's always looking for new and interesting ways to integrate digital tools into her courses, without making them the focus. You can find Amy on Twitter and at Zotero. She also blogs (far too infrequently!) at amycavender.org.

Anastasia Salter is an assistant professor of Information Arts and Technologies at the University of Baltimore. Her primary research is on digital narratives with a continuing focus on virtual worlds, gender and cyberspace, video games, educational games and fan production. She holds a Doctorate in Communications Design from the University of Baltimore and an MFA in Children's Literature at Hollins University. She writes a column speculating on the future of technology and pop culture for CinCity2000, Future Fragments. She's on Twitter as @AnaSalter and online at Selfloud.net

Billie Hara is a lecturer in the Department of English at the University of Texas, Arlington. For several years, Billie has been developing alternative pedagogies that aid in the teaching of writing to underprepared students. These pedagogies include using new media and service learning. As executive director of Write to Succeed, Inc., a Texas-based nonprofit literacy organization, Billie was able to bring literacy programs and practices to schools and community groups (children, women in domestic violence shelters). Additionally, many of the alternative pedagogies have come from her love of and skill with a camera. For three years, Billie participated in Project 365, a photo a day photography project. In addition to maintaining her blog, PartsnPieces, Ph.D., and her photoblog, PartsnPieces: A Photoblog, Billie can be found on Twitter, Flickr, and Delicious.

Brian Croxall is the Digital Humanities Strategist at Emory University's Digital Scholarship Commons (DiSC) and Lecturer of English. Receiving a Commodore 64 for Christmas when he was 7 provoked a lifelong fascination with technology. His research into the relationship between technological metaphors and psychological trauma allows him to read and teach across 150 years of American literature. When he's not busy with that, his work in the digital humanities concerns the visualization of space and time, and he has developed tutorials for doing the latter. Brian blogs on occasion, writes about music, loves board games, and tweets about all of them. He's a contributing editor to the to the #alt-academy project. He doesn't leave the house without USB cables or a novel.

Erin E. Templeton is an Assistant Professor of English at Converse College, a women's liberal arts college in Spartanburg, South Carolina. There she teaches American literature, twentieth-century British and Irish literature, and composition. Her current research interests focus on various configurations of male-female authorship in transatlantic modern literature. She currently serves as the Vice-President of the William Carlos Williams Society. One of these days, she aspires to write an essay on F. Scott Fitzgerald "with soul," like her idol Sydney Bristow, and in her spare time, she enjoys walking her dog and cheering for the Pittsburgh Steelers. You can find her on Twitter as @eetempleton.

Ethan Watrall is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Anthropology and Associate Director of Matrix: The Center for Humane Arts, Letters & Social Sciences Online at Michigan State University. Ethan also holds adjunct appointments in a wide variety of departments and programs at MSU including Museum Studies and American Studies. In addition, Ethan is a Principal Investigator in the Games for Entertainment & Learning Lab, and co- founder of both the undergraduate Specialization and Game Design Development and the MA in Serious Game Design at Michigan State University. Ethan's primary area of research is in the domain of cultural heritage informatics, specifically serious games for cultural heritage learning, outreach, and engagement. In addition to his academic work, Ethan has written numerous technical trade books for publishers such as Wiley, Sybex, and O'Reilly on interactive design and user centered/user experience design. Ethan's digital alter ego can be found at http://www.captainprimate.com. Ethan can also be found on Twitter at @captain_primate.

Heather M. Whitney is Assistant Professor of Physics at Wheaton College in Wheaton, Illinois. Her research interests include nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) of macromolecules, specifically for the development of polymer gel dosimeters for radiation therapy. She is also active in the physics education research community. Heather is passionate about eating well and is an enthusiastic supporter of local food markets and restaurants. You can find her on her personal website at heathermwhitney.com and on Twitter as @drhmw.

Jeffrey W. McClurken is Associate Professor and Chair of History and American Studies at the University of Mary Washington in Fredericksburg, Virginia. His research areas include the history of veterans, families, gender, the Pinkertons, mental institutions, the 19th-Century American South, and the digital humanities. [These are fields that overlap more than you might think....] He teaches classes on a wide array of US History topics, including American technology and culture, digital history, women's history, and TED.com. His book, Take Care of the Living: Reconstructing the Confederate Veteran Family in Virginia, was just released by UVA Press. His interest in the digital humanities began while programming his Commodore 64 using a cassette tape drive in the 1980s, but really took off when he entered census data and hand-coded HTML for the Valley of the Shadow project in the mid-1990s. He has been involved in digital pedagogy since making his students hand code HTML in the early years of the 2000s. He blogs at Techist, tweets from @jmcclurken, and Zoteros at http://www.zotero.org/jmcclurken. Links to his classes and presentations can be found at http://mcclurken.org/.

Kathleen Fitzpatrick is Professor of Media Studies at Pomona College, in Claremont, California. She is author of The Anxiety of Obsolescence: The American Novel in the Age of Television, published in 2006 by Vanderbilt University Press, and of Planned Obsolescence: Publishing, Technology, and the Future of the Academy, forthcoming from NYU Press and available for open peer review online. She is co-coordinating editor of MediaCommons, and has published articles and notes in journals including the Journal of Electronic Publishing, PMLA, Contemporary Literature, and Cinema Journal.

Lincoln Mullen is a PhD student in the department of history at Brandeis University in Waltham, Massachusetts. He is a historian of religion and early America and the nineteenth century. Though his research has been mostly about 17th- and 18th-century New England, he is moving to the 19th century for his dissertation on religious conversion. Lincoln is also involved in the digital humanities, serving as one of the organizers of THATCamp New England in 2010 and 2011. He can be found on Zotero, Github, Twitter (@lincolnmullen), and his personal website. You can e-mail him at lincoln@lincolnmullen.com.

Mark Sample is an Associate Professor of literature and new media at George Mason University, where he researches and teaches contemporary and experimental literature, electronic literature, graphic novels, and videogames. Mark is deeply invested in the idea of the open source professor, in which scholarship and pedagogy alike are shared at every step along the way toward the production and representation of knowledge in our research and with our students. This practice of sharing and collaboration finds a perfect home at ProfHacker. In addition to his official GMU web presence, Mark blogs about the digital humanities, pedagogy, and anything else that strikes his fancy at samplereality.com. Mark can occasionally be found on Twitter as well under the name samplereality.

Natalie M. Houston is an Associate Professor in the Department of English at the University of Houston, where she teaches courses in Victorian literature, bibliography and research methods, women writers, and science fiction. She has published on nineteenth-century women writers and Victorian poetry and print culture. She is the Project Director for The Visual Page, an NEH-funded project to develop a software application to analyze visual features in digitized Victorian books of poetry, such as margin space, line indentation, and typeface attributes. She is also a Co-Director of the Periodical Poetry Index, a research database of citations to English-language poems published in nineteenth-century periodicals. In addition, she is a personal productivity coach who helps academics, writers, and entrepreneurs who want to stop procrastinating, gain more control over their time, and move forward on the projects and goals that matter most to them. She is a longtime student of mind/body integration and personal self-improvement, and has been writing online under various names since 2004. She currently blogs at http://nmhouston.com/ and can be found on Twitter at @nmhouston.

Nels P. Highberg is Associate Professor and Chair of Rhetoric and Professional Writing at the University of Hartford. He is the co-editor of Landmark Essays in Basic Writing and Writing Groups Inside and Outside the Classroom, both from Lawrence Erlbaum Associates, and his essays have appeared in Medical Humanities Review, Feminist Foundations, Feminist Teacher, and Get Real: Documentary Theatre Past and Present. In February 1999, Nels started his first online journal and has been playing in various online environments over the last decade. These days, he can be found in various places; links are on his homepage.

Ryan Cordell is Assistant Professor of English at Northeastern University. Ryan's work focuses on intersections between religion and fiction in nineteenth-century American mass media. He is currently developing a comparative, digital edition of Nathaniel Hawthorne's "The Celestial Railroad" at celestialrailroad.org. Ryan is also a founding board member of centerNet's DHCommons Initiative, which is an online hub focused on matching digital humanities projects seeking assistance with scholars interested in project collaboration. You can find out more about what Ryan is up to on his website or on Twitter at @ryancordell.

Konrad Lawson is a Ph.D. Candidate in the history department at Harvard University where he is completing his dissertation "Treason and the Reconstruction of Nation in East Asia, 1937-1951" on retribution against collaborators with Japan in wartime and early postwar Korea and China. He is the founder of the academic group blogs on East Asian history at Frog in a Well and together with its editor, helped transform the Sino-Japanese Studies journal into an open access publication online at Chinajapan.org. You can read more about his research and other projects at Muninn.net.


Content Categories
Our content is organized into the following general categories, and you are likely to find posts associated with more than one of these categories:

» Editorial: about ProfHacker, plus regular features (Open Thread Wednesday, Weekend Reading, Week in Review, and From the Archives)

» Profession: research, administration, meetings, conferences; other professional responsibilities, duties, and goals

» Teaching: from general pedagogical discussions to specific classroom activities and tools (it's a very wide range!)

» Productivity: time management, planning, and self-improvement

» Wellness: "What's for Lunch?" feature, plus content focusing on mindfulness and exercise

» Software: specific tools and products, as well as programming languages and best practices

» Hardware: devices of all sizes, such as smartphones, netbooks, microphones, and more

» Analog: non-digital tools and technologies that we work with everyday (we love those too)

» Reviews: product and book reviews (solicited or unsolicited)


Contribute to ProfHacker
You can always contribute to ProfHacker by suggesting a link.

Moreover, ProfHacker welcomes contributions in the following areas:

     • Screencasts
     • Video podcasts
     • Interviews
     • How-to
     • Working with your IT department
     • What to Expect
     • "What's in your backpack/messenger bag/briefcase? / What's on your desk?" features
     • Software reviews
     • Website reviews
     • Database reviews
     • Book reviews
     • Conference blogging
     • and more!

If you're interested in contributing to these or any other topics that fit our mission, drop us a line.


The paragraph form: Mark Sample is an Assistant Professor in the Department of English at George Mason University, where he researches and teaches contemporary and experimental literature, electronic literature, graphic novels, and videogames. Mark is deeply invested in the idea of the open source professor, in which scholarship and pedagogy alike are shared at every step along the way toward the production and representation of knowledge in our research and with our students. This practice of sharing and collaboration finds a perfect home at ProfHacker. In addition to his official GMU web presence, Mark blogs about the digital humanities, pedagogy, and anything else that strikes his fancy at samplereality.com. Mark can occasionally be found on Twitter as well under the name samplereality.

Commenting and Community Guidelines

We are committed to fostering an environment characterized by generosity, creativity, and (as corny as it might sound) kindness. Comments on this blog are an important part of creating that environment, and this comment policy aims to communicate our values to new readers and encourage comments that will build up the online community here.

Thoughtful comments (even when—and often especially if—disagreeing) are encouraged and appreciated.

No snark allowed (see David Denby on definition of snark). While snark certainly has its virtues, this blog provides a space for people to be inexperienced at something—or even wrong—to facilitate learning. That's harder to do in the face of either persistent or "drive-by" snark.

ProfHacker should be a community built through regular comments made by recognized—but not necessarily "real name"—contributors. Some commenters' identities reveal their real names; other commenters use pseudonyms. Our online identities are built from our comments here and our presence—as commenters and authors—in other places on the web, in print, at conferences. ProfHacker welcomes commenters—whether anonymous, pseudonymous, or publically identified—who are committed to creating a rich and respectful dialogue. We want commenters to be able to explore the complexities of ProfHacker posts; we want commenters to inquire and debate; we want everyone to be able to learn from the conversation.

Links & images are encouraged. Gratuitous linking back to your own site is discouraged.