The Banned Book List

<< < (6/26) > >>

bibliothecula:
Quote from: georgia_guy on June 27, 2007,  3:49:23 PM

Quote from: crazybatlady on March 15, 2007,  7:25:42 PM

The Earth's Children Series by Jean M. Auel


I'll have to admit that by the fifth book, I was rather tired of hearing about the size of Jondalar's you-know-what, but did someone really get them banned?


I think this was the chosen method of educating 6th graders about sex in my middleschool school district. The parents all knew everyone was passing Auel's books around and were probably worried that if they were banned, the parents would have to go back to giving "the talk."

collegekidsmom:
Just to let anyone interested know-Banned Books Week is coming up.  The American Library Association sells various products (designed for ALA's Office for Intellectual Freedom) to raise awareness of the issue. This is a piece of an email I received today from ALA:

"Raise awareness during Banned Books Week!
Banned Books Week is Sept. 29-Oct. 6...


Banned Books Week is sponsored by the American Booksellers Association, American
Booksellers Foundation for Free Expression, American Library Association, American
Society of Journalists and Authors, Association of American Publishers, and National
Association of College Stores. It is endorsed by the Center for the Book in the
Library of Congress."

sikora:
The public library in Armpit Kansas has a banned book display (you go, librarians in this little town)!.  One title is Little House on the Prairie.  Good heavens, why?  I read somewhere that some political body wanted to ban The Diary of Ann Frank because it is too depressing. 

sikora

dept_geek:
Quote from: sikora on October 02, 2007, 12:15:11 PM

The public library in Armpit Kansas has a banned book display (you go, librarians in this little town)!.  One title is Little House on the Prairie.  Good heavens, why?  I read somewhere that some political body wanted to ban The Diary of Ann Frank because it is too depressing. 

sikora


This site: http://title.forbiddenlibrary.com/ tells why various books were (or were attempted to be) banned.

Little House in the Big Woods. Laura Ingalls Wilder. Buccaneer; harper; Transaction. Removed from the classrooms, but later reinstated, for third-graders at the Lincoln Unified School District in Stockton, Calif. (1996). Complainants also want the book removed from the library because it "promotes racial epithets and is fueling the fire of racism."


This one is just funny:
Where's Waldo? Martin Handford. Little. Challenged at the Public Libraries of Saginaw, Mich. (1989), Removed from the Springs Public School library in East Hampton, N.Y. (1993) because there is a tiny drawing of a woman lying on the beach wearing a bikini bottom but no top. Yes, but did they find Waldo?


Here is another great site: http://www.ala.org/ala/oif/bannedbooksweek/bannedbooksweek.htm

From the ALA site:

The "10 Most Challenged Books of 2006" reflect a range of themes, and consist of the following titles:

"And Tango Makes Three" by Justin Richardson and Peter Parnell, for homosexuality, anti-family, and unsuited to age group;


"Gossip Girls" series by Cecily Von Ziegesar for homosexuality, sexual content, drugs, unsuited to age group, and offensive language;


"Alice" series by Phyllis Reynolds Naylor for sexual content and offensive language;


"The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big Round Things" by Carolyn Mackler for sexual content, anti-family, offensive language, and unsuited to age group;


"The Bluest Eye" by Toni Morrison for sexual content, offensive language, and unsuited to age group;


"Scary Stories" series by Alvin Schwartz for occult/Satanism, unsuited to age group, violence, and insensitivity;


"Athletic Shorts" by Chris Crutcher for homosexuality and offensive language.


"The Perks of Being a Wallflower" by Stephen Chbosky for homosexuality, sexually explicit, offensive language, and unsuited to age group


"Beloved" by Toni Morrison for offensive language, sexual content, and unsuited to age group;


"The Chocolate War" by Robert Cormier for sexual content, offensive language, and violence.

Off the list this year, but on for several years past, are the "Catcher in the Rye" by J.D. Salinger, "Of Mice and Men" by John Steinbeck and "The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" by Mark Twain.



This title, "The Earth, My Butt, and Other Big Round Things", perhaps belongs with the fluffy faculty :-)


sikora:
Funny reasons to ban books.

When I was in graduate school, I worked as a clerk in a public library (great job!), for 5 years.  Couple of funny instances.  When Madonna's book Sex came out, the librarian chose not to buy it because it is spiral bond, and thus wouldn't last physically.  One day a woman stormed, and I mean stormed, into the library and demanded to know if we were getting the book.  The librarian said no, and then the patron demanded to know why not.  So the librarian explained that spiral bond books don't hold up, but fall apart readily.  The patron then really went ballistic.  "That's not the reason not to buy it!"  She was furious!

Another time, a patron brought Heather has Two Mommies up to the circulation desk.  She said it was inappropriate because it mentions aspirin, and children must not be given aspirin.  The book was dangerous because children and parents would think it was okay to give kids aspirin. 

Today, a teen and her mentor were in the public library, looking through the YA books.  The girl said "My parents spent 20 dollars on a Harry Potter book just to throw it in the fire.  It is against our religion.  I thought it was pretty good.  I just checked it out from here and read it on the bus to school."

sikora

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page