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Author Topic: Zizek  (Read 16305 times)
tuxedo_cat
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« Reply #15 on: September 02, 2011, 9:58:10 AM »

Oooooh, there's more!

The Horror of Tulips

Really, how can you not love this guy.
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glenwood
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« Reply #16 on: September 02, 2011, 4:23:02 PM »

Look, you read Zizek for the same reason you go to the gym and beat yourself up on the treadmill:  it's just really hard, but it does feel like you must be doing something impressive with yourself.  And then you can feel really smug about the whole business later.

At the very least you should watch his videos.  I was going to post his 40 min. lecture on "What does it mean to be a revolutionary today?"  But I'm opting for his reflections on why Love is Evil.

Be careful.  You might just fall in love with him.

He's not that hard. Really, he's not that difficult at all. He is also not very credible. Becoming a follower of Žižek is like spending all your time on the stationary exercise bike and convincing yourself that real bicycles are evil, the person who invented bicycles was part of an oppressive ideological system which you are resisting by riding a stationary exercise bike, and that you exhibit your revolutionary powers of resistance by what you listen to while exercising.

Enjoy!
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traductio
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« Reply #17 on: September 02, 2011, 4:59:34 PM »

Becoming a follower of Žižek is like spending all your time on the stationary exercise bike and convincing yourself that real bicycles are evil, the person who invented bicycles was part of an oppressive ideological system which you are resisting by riding a stationary exercise bike, and that you exhibit your revolutionary powers of resistance by what you listen to while exercising.

Enjoy!

This is one of the best one-sentence reviews of any theorist I have ever read. I'm a fan of theory as a genre -- I really like post-structuralism, I admit -- but this capsule review is a thing of beauty.
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merce
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« Reply #18 on: September 02, 2011, 5:01:45 PM »

Oh puhleze. Zizek is funny not hard.

At least so I thought. A prof had us read Looking Awry in undergrad. Within the first few pages I was in love.
I guess that explains an awful lot, but there you have it.
I had not read a lick of Lacan but was eager to try thanks to Zizek. That should tell you how easy he is to read. I mean, he makes Lacan easy and fun.
Anyone who can do that can make anything easy and fun.
And totally unpretentious.

Then I went to grad school and while my interest in Foucault died my love of Zizek only grew stronger. I dreamed of learning Bulgarian and going to sit at his feet in Lublijana. (Bulgarian because that´s what I had at home in case you´re confused)

I eventually met him and drove him about in my beat up car that started with a screw driver.
Rikija was involved.
I no longer drink rikija but I still love Zizek.
I love people/writers who are unpretentious except when called for in their self caricaturizing.

I´ll give you 50 dollars and a trinket if you don´t fall in love with him YT.
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tuxedo_cat
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« Reply #19 on: September 03, 2011, 11:59:45 AM »


I eventually met him and drove him about in my beat up car that started with a screw driver.
Rikija was involved.
I no longer drink rikija but I still love Zizek.
I love people/writers who are unpretentious except when called for in their self caricaturizing.

Merce, you lucky cat, you!

(I guess now we know who has been taking all those candid videos of him hahahaha!)
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whytriangles
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« Reply #20 on: September 17, 2011, 3:43:58 PM »

I'd start by reading his primer on Lacan, aptly titled How to Read Lacan. It's a short and rather straightforward read.

After that, watch the film he did titled A Pervert's Guide to Cinema.

Then decide if you wish to further pursue Zizek. There are numerous papers of his available online. Also worth looking him up on Youtube as he is a rather eccentric lecturer.
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treehugger1
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« Reply #21 on: September 23, 2011, 1:13:21 PM »

Like Lacan, Zizek is an aware, self-proclaimed charlatan.

Maybe I'll be moved to find links (evidence) later. Maybe not.
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melba_frilkins
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« Reply #22 on: September 26, 2011, 2:01:48 AM »

Oooooh, there's more!

The Horror of Tulips

Really, how can you not love this guy.

I just want to see the look on his face when he learns that tulips are self-pollinating.
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alpha_bet
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« Reply #23 on: December 02, 2011, 8:59:24 AM »

"He's not that hard. Really, he's not that difficult at all. He is also not very credible."

- This is what worries me. I'd really like to use one of his readings of Lacan to support a central argument of my thesis... but I'm worried he's too shaky of a reference to hold up such an important part of my argument.

Issues of likability aside, I'm interested in hearing more on why he's not credible.
Is it his forays into filmmaking?
Or the way he tries to make his examples contemporary hot issues?
Or his Marxism?
Or is it that, simply put, American academics don't cotton to psychoanalytic theory (or Marxism) anymore?
 [I've had a reviewer of my own work ask me to take out references to Freud because "it might be a better idea not to go in that direction."
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tuxedo_cat
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« Reply #24 on: December 02, 2011, 11:22:07 AM »

"He's not that hard. Really, he's not that difficult at all. He is also not very credible."

- This is what worries me. I'd really like to use one of his readings of Lacan to support a central argument of my thesis... but I'm worried he's too shaky of a reference to hold up such an important part of my argument.

Issues of likability aside, I'm interested in hearing more on why he's not credible.
Is it his forays into filmmaking?
Or the way he tries to make his examples contemporary hot issues?
Or his Marxism?
Or is it that, simply put, American academics don't cotton to psychoanalytic theory (or Marxism) anymore?
 [I've had a reviewer of my own work ask me to take out references to Freud because "it might be a better idea not to go in that direction."

I believe your average argument between Lacanians and Freudians (or perhaps object relations / Kleinian folks?) eventually turns into a bloodbath.  Or so I've heard.  In any case, all stripes of psychoanalysis are not the same.

Your question is *very* field dependent and perhaps a generational issue as well.  I'm in lit and my general impression is that Zizek's written work is regarded quite highly by a lot of people, but certainly not everyone.  I rather enjoy his more clownish side, as it suggests that he doesn't take himself too seriously.  I'm not in the thick of these debates, so others will likely have different views.     

Outside of literary studies, the "credibility" of various intellectual traditions may vary even more.  I know a lot of historians who find "theory" tiresome and nonsensical.  But I imagine your average Latin Americanist probably finds Marxist theory and traditions of thinking quite valuable.

Also, I didn't know about The Pervert's Guide to Cinema (posted upthread), although I watched bits of it over the break.  And I think many of the YouTube clips I was finding were actually lifted from that film.  It is freakin' hilarious -- and wonderfully insightful.  But clearly not for everyone.  You can access it here:

http://www.movie2k.to/The-Pervert-s-Guide-to-Cinema-watch-movie-621236.html
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merce
strange attractor
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« Reply #25 on: December 02, 2011, 2:55:59 PM »

In my discipline Zizek is a valid thinker. No one would think you were weird for citing him or even engaging him fully in your work.
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spammer 
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alpha_bet
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« Reply #26 on: December 02, 2011, 3:49:16 PM »

I dunno. I sometimes get the feeling today's literary people (journal editors, I guess I mean) have it in for Klein, Freud, Lacan or anything leaning in any of those directions.

What worries me sometimes personally about Zizek is that his arguments seem a little unbalanced. I mean, when he wants to make a point, he brings out the ammunition and damn the other side.

Speaking of perverts, for example, I just finished his "7 Veils of Fantasy," where his description of the hysteric/perverse relationship plays up the hysteric (almost always referred to with the female pronoun) as a kind of monster, and the pervert (almost always described as male) as some kind of misunderstood hero with no personal motivation but the other's pleasure. Which isn't quite the whole story.
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thenewyorker
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« Reply #27 on: December 02, 2011, 5:34:00 PM »

One of my colleagues just shared that her babysitter, who happens to be evangelical, just became visibly excited upon glimpsing her copy of Zizek's Living in the End Times and asked "Are you reading this book? What's it about?"
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