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Author Topic: Disabled student wants never to come to class or have any deadlines  (Read 3334 times)
anon99
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« Reply #15 on: November 17, 2012, 11:12:35 am »

You cannot reasonably be expected to custom design a course into a completely differnet course for just this student. Go to your chair and ask them how you are supposed to handle this. Emphasize that you are willing to be flexible with reasonable accommodation requests, but this seems to be fundamentally changing the nature of the course.

The student may miss the odd lecture, but they should be expected to attend class just like every other student.  Similarly with deadlines.  If the student gets a migraine and can't hand in an assignment, treat it like any other illness and follow your policy for that.  The student saying they do not want to attend any class  or have any deadlines is BS, though you can't tell the snowflake that....

I have had migraines and yes went to ER a few times because of them.  This is something the student may have long term and they need to learn how to deal with them.
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pathogen
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« Reply #16 on: November 17, 2012, 11:34:19 am »

Another consideration: I will not accept late work is after it has been returned graded to other students, and I have posted the answer key for reference. If the student has no deadlines, will he have access to graded work and answer guides when other students have already turned work in?
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glowdart
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« Reply #17 on: November 17, 2012, 1:39:31 pm »

This might not be the best time for you to be enrolled in this course.  I would advise you to talk to the Dean about obtaining a late medical withdrawal, as you are currently unable to fulfill the requirements of the course.

This.

Suggesting that to the Disabilities office is one thing, but not to the student.

I've had weird requests from Disabilities Services, too, but they usually stem from the office not knowing what goes on my classroom. Maybe they think that your course teaches to the test, or something like that.

You already intend to contest the accommodation, so just explain why these particular accommodations make it impossible for the student to meet the learning objectives of the course, and would involve creating an entirely new course just for the student.

Let them advise the student to withdraw.

I'm assuming that a DS office that would concoct an accommodations plan which undermines basic pedagogy that completely would never in a million years even think of suggesting that the student withdraw.

And, that's the same basic email I send to every student with endless excuses about not doing the work, no matter the cause.  Sometimes, really, this is NOT the right semester for you to be in college.  Many times, this is NOT the right semester for you to be in this class.  In this case, if the medical condition is so severe, then the student is a prime candidate for a late medical withdrawal.  Go see what the options are. 

And, in this case, if the student can't get to class ever, then perhaps his/her time and money would be better spent finding a drug and life regimen that enables a basic level of functioning rather than spending however many thousands of dollars to end up with a series of WFs and Fs on the transcript, or to carry a series of Incompletes into the next semester where s/he's still trying to figure out how to live in her new reality but is doing so under immense stress that wouldn't be a factor if people would just accept that you sometimes need to take some time off.

Maybe it's just my campus, but we have far too many students who simply should NOT be here but have never been told that it's not only "okay" but often "a really good idea" to take a semester off.  Between the parents and the DS office's attempt to make school seem possible for everyone no matter whether or not they are physically capable of getting to class and mentally present and not trying to learn while in excruciating pain.... sometimes the students need to hear that it's okay to drop.  They need someone to tell them that they are not a failure as a human being because their body is acting up.  And if stress is any kind of a trigger for this student, then can you imagine what the stress of trying to pass a class that s/he never attends is going to do?  Or, the stress that results from failing the class that the DS and the parents worked so hard to get accommodations for?   

Long-term health and developing good coping strategies are way more important than finishing this class this semester.
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daniel_von_flanagan
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« Reply #18 on: November 17, 2012, 2:08:13 pm »

Our campus offers a credit-by-exam option: a student who signs up for this pays tuition for the class, and the department gets credit for the student, but the student only takes the final and gets a grade based on that.  You could offer something like this to the student, that way his or her disability will not involve extra work (like grading late papers) on your part...at least, until they come in to complain about their grade after they fail the final exam. - DvF
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spork
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« Reply #19 on: November 17, 2012, 4:19:39 pm »

Our campus offers a credit-by-exam option: a student who signs up for this pays tuition for the class, and the department gets credit for the student, but the student only takes the final and gets a grade based on that.  You could offer something like this to the student, that way his or her disability will not involve extra work (like grading late papers) on your part...at least, until they come in to complain about their grade after they fail the final exam. - DvF

You mean competency testing? What a novel idea.
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daniel_von_flanagan
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« Reply #20 on: November 17, 2012, 4:39:34 pm »

Our campus offers a credit-by-exam option: a student who signs up for this pays tuition for the class, and the department gets credit for the student, but the student only takes the final and gets a grade based on that.  You could offer something like this to the student, that way his or her disability will not involve extra work (like grading late papers) on your part...at least, until they come in to complain about their grade after they fail the final exam. - DvF

You mean competency testing? What a novel idea.
Where did you get this?  The students take our regular comprehensive final exam, which is hardly just a competency test.

In any event, the point isn't that it is a novel idea, but that it is a way to accommodate a difficult student who does not want to come to class or do the in-semester work. - DvF
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valmor84
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« Reply #21 on: November 17, 2012, 10:57:09 pm »

I have suffered from debilitating migraines since the age of 9, at the rate of about 3 a week. I have lost vision in one eye during at least 50 memorable attacks. I walked down the aisle in a non-fouffy wedding dress with a migraine. I was hooded at my graduate school ceremony with a migraine.

I would be enraged at this student's outrageous demands, but I suspect that "migraine" is shorthand for something quite unrelated. The student is either a thorough and utter snowflake, a complete flake, or is mentally ill. No one in their right wits could think the requests conveyed by your Office of Disability Services were possible in an aligned universe.



 
« Last Edit: November 17, 2012, 10:58:52 pm by valmor84 » Logged
mountainguy
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« Reply #22 on: November 17, 2012, 11:38:46 pm »

[thanks my lucky stars that my campus Disabilities Services Coordinator is fabulous]

I think Prof_Smartypants is right that this is an issue that needs to be kicked upstairs to your chair/dean because of the sensitivities involved.
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vortian
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« Reply #23 on: November 18, 2012, 1:17:52 am »

Wow. I've had a headache constantly for over four years now, have been to the ER for it about 3 times, and have dealt with serious issues with side effects of medications on top of it. When it was at its worst, I had to leave class at times to go to the bathroom to throw up blood from the pain and sometimes the pain has been bad enough for me to feel suicidal (I can't move when it's that bad so I wasn't able to act on it, luckily). My type of headache is rare and considered the most treatment resistant headache type and will most likely never go away, so taking time off would have been unlikely to help. I do have a medicine that helps me get it to levels where it's not as bad as it was at its worst most of the time. But I've never thought that what I've been going through is something that I should go to a disability office about. Maybe I'm just stubborn, but I figured I just had to push through it and do the best I could given the circumstances.
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alleyoxenfree
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« Reply #24 on: November 18, 2012, 4:02:26 am »

An interesting range of responses here, and it's much appreciated!

Chair and I have talked it over, and decided to devise a plan that recommends withdrawal, anticipates that the student will ask for an incomplete instead, and essentially lets them try to finish - more or less because it's so late in the semester and I doubt the student will.

I asked the question partly to reality-check my reactions and qualms about pedagogy with others, and partly to try to figure out what to do to forestall this in the future.  It's not clear that one really CAN, if their SDR office will classify absolutely anything as a disability and take any disability and interpret "reasonable accommodation" to mean, whatever the he!! the student wants or doesn't want to do.  I see this as a lawsuit waiting to happen by some OTHER student who doesn't get the grade they want, and who then objects to allowances made for the SDR student.  I'm also keenly aware of the amazingly difficult family circumstances many of my students cope with - several of them in this very section - and who manage to keep to syllabus policies and do at least passing work.  Effectively, I feel like I'm being made party to "unequal treatment" and am pretty uncomfortable with it.

Thanks for the insights.
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mystictechgal
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« Reply #25 on: November 19, 2012, 12:10:57 am »

Our campus offers a credit-by-exam option: a student who signs up for this pays tuition for the class, and the department gets credit for the student, but the student only takes the final and gets a grade based on that.  You could offer something like this to the student, that way his or her disability will not involve extra work (like grading late papers) on your part...at least, until they come in to complain about their grade after they fail the final exam. - DvF

You mean competency testing? What a novel idea.
Where did you get this?  The students take our regular comprehensive final exam, which is hardly just a competency test.

In any event, the point isn't that it is a novel idea, but that it is a way to accommodate a difficult student who does not want to come to class or do the in-semester work. - DvF

My quatloos are on Spork taking this opportunity to bang the drum again for the viability of credentials that have nothing to do with spending X hours in a college classroom.  After all, you just mentioned that a precedent exists for credit by examination administered by people who presumably know what they are doing and are comfortable with credit for evidence of mastery rather than hoop jumping.

Is this unusual? The paying for the course and taking the final exam, alone, as a means to earn the credit, I mean. I know it's an option at the State U here, and I'm pretty sure it's been available (although not widely advertised) anyplace I've ever been, dating back to the early '70s. At some places I've seen them charge less that the full course credit price; at others there is no grade given, per se, just the credits if you pass it; others have worked just as DVF described. It's not the same thing as getting portfolio credit for experiential learning. I've never done it. The classes I might have been capable of doing it in I enjoyed enough that I wanted the class time (or, early on, I just did it unofficially after deciding I didn't want to spend my time in that particular class--showing up only to take the exams, although that also meant taking the midterm). I'm rather surprised that it might be considered an unusual option to offer, though.
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oldfullprof
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« Reply #26 on: November 19, 2012, 2:17:59 am »

The badges idea is a bad idea because it's another thing that's about training and not about a college education.

I tested out of three classes, but they were the whole class.  German 101, which I studied for weeks for and had to pay for.  Physical Science and Biology.  I had taken a weak liberal arts physics (algebra based) and a weak liberal arts chemistry, after dropping Chem 101 way into the semester.  101 had a lab, and it was for pre-med etc.  I took three bios, but they were part of a nursing sequence that, for some reason, didn't transfer to the state college.  This included A&P, Microbiology, and a capstone lab sequense. 

So I clept the Physical Science and Biology.  I had to pay something.   
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baphd1996
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« Reply #27 on: November 19, 2012, 11:55:26 am »

Accommodations for our disabled students are usually fairly easy to make, although a few have challenged our department to find new solutions.  What would you do in this situation?

Your syllabus states that students needing accommodations must provide their paperwork within 2 weeks of the semester beginning.  One of your students provides paperwork give hu a notetaker and this is provided.  Mid-semester, the student has SDR announce a new disability - migraines - backed by a doctor's note.  The requested accommodation in - student wants to be exempted from having to attend any classes.

They also want to be able to turn in any homework and papers late, and any IN-CLASS work at a later date (as homework, rather than, FI, in-class writing), so as not to be penalized for not attending class.  They want all quizzes to be taken as take-home quizzes.  Student also wants an exemption from any deadlines for readings, quizzes, papers, tests, etc. except for, presumably, the "deadline" of the class' end.

Weigh in, forumites!



We had a very similar student.  The initial complaint was sensitivity to chemicals used in a lab.  Eventually it became allergies to some of the buildings on campus.  Other accommodations were also added.  The student was provided a special desk, a special chair, additional time to take exams, allowed to eat during the class, could take exams in a private room (with video security), was allowed to move around during exams, (so she could move to an area out of view of the video security) and unpaid private tutoring by the instructor.  After several years in the program, she was kicked out for not paying tuition.
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mystictechgal
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« Reply #28 on: November 19, 2012, 3:08:10 pm »

Polly, no I haven't spent much time on the MOOC threads. And, I fully agree with you and OFP about a need in some classes to use methods other than testing, but those aren't generally the classes that tend to have high-stakes cumulative finals, either. I'd never suggest that this would be appropriate, or even that it be offered, for all classes. I was just surprised that it seemed to be thought a novel approach. For those skills classes--particularly the lower-level ones--that you mention it has been around a long time.

FTR, I think the folks in the OP's SDR office are idiots, in positions/an area above or outside their competency level, lazy, or some combination of the three.
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Quote
You must realize that a university cannot educate you. You must do that for yourself, although a college or university is the place where it is likely that you can study most efficiently.
http://www.lhup.edu/~dsimanek/chapman.htm

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lucy_
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« Reply #29 on: November 20, 2012, 12:02:29 am »

OP, sounds like you and your admin are working this out, that is good.

I had a student who missed a lot of a lecture class of mine; got a C without being there much, both of us seemed ok with that.

But then the student signed up for another class of mine, where discussions and prep for those discussions was ~25% of the grade. I told the student that she/he had to find a way to be there.

I talked with my department head and she/he agreed.

Miraculously this student was able to make the class when she/he knew she/he had no other option. But couldn't when she/he was not held accountable.

And sorry to everyone here who described such wicked migraines. Mine are not nearly so bad, and I know what that's like to function with.

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