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daniel_von_flanagan:
Quote from: frogfactory on February 12, 2013,  8:04:25 PM

Is there an equivalent of Track Changes in LaTeX?
Well, there's svn+latexdiff, also \changebar.  Or you can just use the same software that collaborative programmers use.

Quote

Also, it's all going to go to the typesetter regardless.
Sure, if you are publishing in the 19th century.  Modern journals with specialized LaTeX classes simply change some header settings (which change the file from a stand-alone doc to one of many in a journal) and combine the LaTeX files.

Seriously, you work with typesetters?  Are they guild members? Do they still use lead type? The last time I published in a journal with human typesetters every set of page proofs came back worse than the last; I think the guys were playing a drinking game while setting my manuscript. - DvF

nezahualcoyotl:
Quote from: daniel_von_flanagan on February 13, 2013,  5:15:08 AM

Quote from: frogfactory on February 12, 2013,  8:04:25 PM

Is there an equivalent of Track Changes in LaTeX?
Well, there's svn+latexdiff, also \changebar.  Or you can just use the same software that collaborative programmers use.


Plus, journals that use Word don't necessarily require the authors to use Track Changes.

Quote from: daniel_von_flanagan on February 13, 2013,  5:15:08 AM

Quote

Also, it's all going to go to the typesetter regardless.
Sure, if you are publishing in the 19th century.  Modern journals with specialized LaTeX classes simply change some header settings (which change the file from a stand-alone doc to one of many in a journal) and combine the LaTeX files.

Seriously, you work with typesetters?  Are they guild members? Do they still use lead type? The last time I published in a journal with human typesetters every set of page proofs came back worse than the last; I think the guys were playing a drinking game while setting my manuscript. - DvF


Yes, it's trivial for a modern journal to produce the actual pdf file available for download (which nowadays is what most people are going to look at) from the authors' LaTex.
In my department (STEM), there used to be mandatory LaTex courses. It's no longer the case; I suppose some of our students may prefer to write their theses in Word - it's their funeral.

frogfactory:
Quote from: daniel_von_flanagan on February 13, 2013,  5:15:08 AM



Seriously, you work with typesetters? 


Absolutely.  Of course, asking medical professionals to learn LaTeX is more of a stretch than asking academic scientists, I suppose.

quasicat:
Quote from: infopri on February 09, 2013, 12:50:45 AM

Quote from: melba_frilkins on February 08, 2013,  8:08:53 PM

Quote from: infopri on February 08, 2013,  7:12:47 PM

Even if they're smart enough to change the author's name in the document properties, geonerd, all is not lost--you can still bust 'em on the time the document was created.  (Every Microsoft document has a timestamp to the nearest second in the "Advanced Properties" box.)

Last year, I had nine students in one class each hand in a homework file (each with his or her own name in the properties), and all nine files were created at the exact same moment.  If they'd all been created at the same minute, I might have at least considered coincidence (they started the assignment in lab)--but the same second?  Busted.  (They all got a zero on the assignment and a written explanation of the reason--and not one of them complained or said boo about it.)


How do you have students turning in the papers? On the CMS that my campus uses, when I download a student's paper, the timestamp seems to be "updated" to the time when I downloaded it, and the original info is just gone.


First, make sure you're in the "Advanced Properties" feature, not just the properties that show up on the "Info" tab in the "Backstage" area (that is, where you are when you click the "File" tab).  In the Advanced Properties box, you have several tabs (General, Summary, Statistics, Contents, Custom).  If you look on the "General" tab, you're right, the timestamps change when you download the document--but on the "Statistics" tab, the original information is retained.  The timestamp you're looking for is the one for "Created."


Thanks for this--this was really helpful for some students I have that claim that there's no possible way that their proposals were 70% similar.  I mean, they live "across town from each other."  The internet is a powerful tool.  One day we will be able to share information across whole towns and stop using the pony express to share documents.

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