Bonus Points; Extra Credit

(1/9) > >>

chicago_48:
I work at an Urban Community College.  That should give you a clue what I have to put up with.

I need some guidance.
I started giving students "bonus" points (group PPT presentation or answer discussion board questions) because students at the end of the semester always wanted to know how they could get extra credit....the students who were failing mostly.
So I started the Bonus Points option.  It gives them an extra boost over their grade.

This semester has been a total fail.  I don't do well in human relations and I found that there was so much conflict among these groups (you name it it happened) that I've decided not to do it again.

So I need some suggestions....and guidance.
Would you give students an "option" to earn extra points?
What would you suggest would be good ways to earn extra points?

I've never ever had so many begging students before as I've had this semester.  I've never ever seen student groups break down the way they did this semester.  So I'm out of the PPT bonus points game in the future.

road537:
I do not like giving students extra credit because it distracts from the regular work in the semester. Also, I find that the ones who pursue it can include those grubbing to get an A and I don't like the idea of giving an 'extra-credit' A. I wouldn't mind giving something for students who need to boost a quiz area where they might have had one sick day/poor-performance day. I think that I got this idea from the forum- to have a make-up quiz (optional) for students at the end of the semester to replace their lowest quiz grade. No other little projects are worth grading in my estimation.

merope:
I like bonus points that benefit the student (by developing good study habits) and are easy to grade. So, this semester I have had bonus points for coming by my office (no takers), printing out the weekly schedule of readings and bringing it to class (about 15% of the class), and completing the third question on a test (at home, any resources they wanted) when the test had required only 2 of the three questions. I also added bonus points to an assignment where students had to attend 2 events by allowing them to attend extra events (their choice of events) and submitting a short paragraph about the extra events (the main assignment was a longer review of the 2 events) along with evidence they had attended the events.

One of my colleagues offers a choice of two projects, both of which are due 2 weeks before the end of the term, and neither of which is substantive to grade (one is a video project which they can complete individually or in groups, and they upload it to YouTube, where he watches at his leisure; the other is designing a cartoon or illustration relevant to the class materials, which he then uses in subsequent semesters).

hiddendragon:
I do offer easy extra credits.  Students love me for it.  Most don't bother doing it even though it's so easy.  They merely attend a talk on campus or do something related to the class for some points.  I just require them to write a 1-page response.  I read it and grade from 5-10 points.  I add these small points to the participation portion of the grades which is worth about 15% of my overall course grade.  I don't think the few points drastically affect their overall grades that much.  I find that it's the good students rather than the lazy ones who do it.  I have no problems boosting the good students' grades.  Most cases, they don't even need it.

larryc:
Quote from: road537 on December 06, 2012, 11:00:47 PM

I do not like giving students extra credit because it distracts from the regular work in the semester. Also, I find that the ones who pursue it can include those grubbing to get an A and I don't like the idea of giving an 'extra-credit' A.

This used to be me. But after a few years of teaching at an open admissions state university, I realized a few things:
students who will not study for the final will crawl over broken glass for ten points of extra creditour campus and community was constantly hosting worthwhile events--lectures, plays, art displays, etc.--that were starving for an audiencemy students would benefit from these eventspeople in my college and community really appreciated me steering students to their eventsallowing extra credit almost never changed anyone's grade, because only A students did the extra creditextra credit was an opportunity to get students to write moreI could set things up so it was easy to grade--a single form for every event
So each semester I would have a list of extra credit options. Some were evergreen--visit X museum or Y historic site. The others were things I picked up from the campus bulletins and local paper. I encouraged students to keep an eye our for events I could add to the list.

To get XC, students filled out a form with the 5Ws, attached some proof they were there (ticket stub, program, etc.) and write a 250 word reaction paper, also attached. They had 48 hours to submit.

Students loved the opportunity, and some of them learned and experienced things they would would not have otherwise. It rarely changed anyone's grade. Why not?

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page