NY Times Article on Ebooks

(1/10) > >>

asymptotic:
What are your thoughts on this new use of e-textbooks? The future, or irritating pet project of administrators? Would you use this tracking feature?

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/04/09/technology/coursesmart-e-textbooks-track-students-progress-for-teachers.html?pagewanted=all&_r=2&

blackadder:
No. These are adults students. If they don't want to read the material, that's their choice. I'm not going to constantly monitor their books to make sure they are doing their homework like good little boys and girls. Whether they read or not shows up very clearly in the evaluation methods, if the evaluation methods are designed well.

neutralname:
Quote from: blackadder on April 17, 2013,  3:04:13 PM

No. These are adults students. If they don't want to read the material, that's their choice. I'm not going to constantly monitor their books to make sure they are doing their homework like good little boys and girls. Whether they read or not shows up very clearly in the evaluation methods, if the evaluation methods are designed well.




You may not do this, but I won't be surprised if some Deans will start requiring faculty to send students emails noting that they have not done the reading from the ebook and asking them please to do the reading.  Then with the electronic record of reading not done, they can explain to parents why their children failed the course.

proftowanda:
Quote from: neutralname on April 17, 2013,  3:29:52 PM

Quote from: blackadder on April 17, 2013,  3:04:13 PM

No. These are adults students. If they don't want to read the material, that's their choice. I'm not going to constantly monitor their books to make sure they are doing their homework like good little boys and girls. Whether they read or not shows up very clearly in the evaluation methods, if the evaluation methods are designed well.




You may not do this, but I won't be surprised if some Deans will start requiring faculty to send students emails noting that they have not done the reading from the ebook and asking them please to do the reading.  Then with the electronic record of reading not done, they can explain to parents why their children failed the course.




Shhhh.  Don't tell deans that we already can do this with lectures, other readings, and more on a CMS.  I  occasionally do use that feature; for example, working with a student wondering what more to do to improve, it's useful to point out that said student has not accessed many of the readings, the study terms, the rubric, and other course tools that are there to help students to . . . improve.

But to track this with all students, all of the time?  Thanks, but no thanks; I would rather teach them than track them, for reasons given above by other forumites.

prytania3:
I like it. It would be easier than giving quizzes.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page