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Author Topic: Lumina's "Big Goal" -- 60% of workforce with degree  (Read 4549 times)
kohelet
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« on: March 27, 2012, 11:46:09 AM »

Lumina Foundation has issued a report giving an update on progress toward its "big goal" of 60% of the workforce having a college degree. 

The report is linked from here: http://www.luminafoundation.org/
It's been picked up by news media, for example: http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2012-03-26/college-degrees-adults/53793160/1
And it's being rather blandly reported by the Chronicle here: http://www.usatoday.com/news/nation/story/2012-03-26/college-degrees-adults/53793160/1

I was initially interested in the goal itself.  Is it realistic to expect 60% of our working population to have, as they call it, "high quality degrees and credentials"?  Not just by 2025, but ever?  Just so you know where my thoughts are wandering, all this is being filtered for me through a recent reading of The Bell Curve, critiques of it, and the American Psychological Association task force report responding to it (http://internal.psychology.illinois.edu/~broberts/Neisser%20et%20al,%201996,%20intelligence.pdf) ... So  my first reaction has to do with the difficulty of squaring the population's range of intelligence (a somewhat controversial premise, I realize, but maybe not as controversial as I used to think), the idea of "high quality degrees and credentials," and the goal of 60%.  I'm concerned about the policy/social implications of moving more and more toward an economy with an invisible hand ever pushing stronger and stronger correlations between intelligence and income.

And then I read some of the Chronicle article's comments and did a little digging about Lumina Foundation, which I'd never paid any attention to before.  All this leads to a second question--what about Lumina Foundation itself and their motives?

I definitely don't have a settled opinion about any of this, and I'm sure I'd benefit from reading what others think.
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deadcatbounce
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« Reply #1 on: March 27, 2012, 2:49:41 PM »

Canada is just under 56%, so I don't know why it couldn't be done
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erzuliefreda
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« Reply #2 on: March 27, 2012, 3:10:33 PM »

Chronicle link is here, actually.
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kohelet
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« Reply #3 on: March 27, 2012, 3:56:09 PM »

Whoops--thanks for posting the correct link.
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nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #4 on: March 27, 2012, 5:24:29 PM »

Canada is just under 56%, so I don't know why it couldn't be done

But should it be done, and if so, at what cost?
Besides, why 60%? Why not 55% or 70% or 67.456456456% or 20*pi %? Is there any rationale for this target, particularly as seemingly it's any major, anywhere, or is it an arbitrarily chosen number they came up for political reasons? Is it a viable one, without stoking degree and grade inflation? Surely what developed countries have a shortage of are plumbers, etc, not college graduates, at least not in all majors?
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