help me explain my flipped classroom

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archman:
Is this an open enrollment graduate program, where anybody with a bachelor's degree can be admitted?

It seems that over the last few years, I am hearing more and more comments on the CHE forums regarding teaching issues in graduate classes. Students not wishing to do work outside of class (mostly reading) seems to be the primary complaint.

pathogen:
Revived this thread because I'm in the process of reading course evaluations. I appreciate all the good advice here. Problem is "Have to do homework on concepts we haven't covered in class" has so far occurred several times as a complaint on my evals, and is dragging them down. Ugh. Maybe I need some Jedi mind tricks here.

polly_mer:
Quote from: pathogen on April 14, 2013, 11:58:29 PM

Revived this thread because I'm in the process of reading course evaluations. I appreciate all the good advice here. Problem is "Have to do homework on concepts we haven't covered in class" has so far occurred several times as a complaint on my evals, and is dragging them down. Ugh. Maybe I need some Jedi mind tricks here.


Will your chair/department/college consider the evaluations purely on the numbers (dragging them down is then a legitimate concern) or will they see student complaints like that as whiny?  I ask because this forum has previously discussed that some common complaints that students make are seen as positive by some chairs/departments/college (e.g., writing counted in math class; math counted in a non-math class; made us do assignments every day).  Perhaps the Jedi Mind trick is with your chair/department/college, not the students.

mountainguy:
Quote from: polly_mer on April 15, 2013,  8:43:11 AM

Will your chair/department/college consider the evaluations purely on the numbers (dragging them down is then a legitimate concern) or will they see student complaints like that as whiny?  I ask because this forum has previously discussed that some common complaints that students make are seen as positive by some chairs/departments/college (e.g., writing counted in math class; math counted in a non-math class; made us do assignments every day). 


+1.

At my current place, my department chair responded with snorted laughter when students wrote: "Professor Mountainguy makes us read the book before we come to class!"

If you're at a place where only the numbers matter, the trick is to tell students at the first day of the semester that you expect students to engage with the material, and that if they're looking for a lecture class, they should look elsewhere. Emphasize again and again that you want them to do the homework before class because you care about them and want them to have a good grasp of the subject material. Lather, rinse, repeat.

archman:
Quote from: mountainguy on April 15, 2013, 10:43:55 AM

Quote from: polly_mer on April 15, 2013,  8:43:11 AM

Will your chair/department/college consider the evaluations purely on the numbers (dragging them down is then a legitimate concern) or will they see student complaints like that as whiny?  I ask because this forum has previously discussed that some common complaints that students make are seen as positive by some chairs/departments/college (e.g., writing counted in math class; math counted in a non-math class; made us do assignments every day). 


+1.

At my current place, my department chair responded with snorted laughter when students wrote: "Professor Mountainguy makes us read the book before we come to class!"

Yeah, that kind of goes with the student evals where they write "too much work!" Any administator that views critiques like this in the *negative* are generally...
- edu wonks
- idiots
- sissies
- noobs
- working at a "customer service" college

Ha ha.

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