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Author Topic: Bizarre conference invitations  (Read 80741 times)
niceday
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« Reply #15 on: May 17, 2011, 2:16:29 PM »

There needs to be a spamference/spamjournal wiki. Many of these appear to be scams which take money in return for CV lines.
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neutralname
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« Reply #16 on: May 17, 2011, 6:33:32 PM »

There needs to be a spamference/spamjournal wiki. Many of these appear to be scams which take money in return for CV lines.

If there were a wiki, wouldn't the conference organizers just delete their conference from the list?  I'm sure that's what ORT would do.
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tenured_feminist
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« Reply #17 on: May 17, 2011, 9:07:27 PM »

There needs to be a spamference/spamjournal wiki. Many of these appear to be scams which take money in return for CV lines.

If there were a wiki, wouldn't the conference organizers just delete their conference from the list?  I'm sure that's what ORT would do.

If there were such a wiki, the Midwest Political Science Association would track down a snail mail address and send it 14 postcards encouraging the wiki to submit a proposal.
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niceday
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« Reply #18 on: May 17, 2011, 9:42:24 PM »

Ok, maybe some trusted, secure academic needs to start a web page and start naming the worst culprits? I mean, there may be some which are borderline but the worst ones are so obviously just scams.
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ucprof
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« Reply #19 on: May 18, 2011, 12:21:11 AM »

Once I got invited to give a talk at a conference in Latvia.  I clicked on the web link and the web page had a picture of the earth with a big arrow pointing to... Latvia.  I kid you not.  I guess they figured people would ask themselves where the heck is Latvia so they put that first and foremost on the web page.  I did not go but mainly because it was not a good match for my research.
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msparticularity
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« Reply #20 on: May 18, 2011, 3:14:39 AM »

I recently got an invitation to a forensics conference in China--based upon my "world renown" as a forensics instructor. The thing is, they were looking for CSI-type forensics, and I was a debate coach!

You mean this one? 

Quote
Dear Dr. Neutralname

My name is Emma. I am in charge of the organization of the World Congress of Forensics 2011 (WCF-2011, http://www.bitlifesciences.com/wcf2011/), to be held in Chongqing, China, Oct. 16-18, 2011, and I am contacting you because we know your great contributions to the field of forensics. On behalf of the organization of the WCF-2011, I would like to inquire if you could consider supporting our efforts of promoting international and interdisciplinary exchange on Forensic by participating and presenting your research within the scope of WCF-2011.

I need to inform the Provost of my expertise, after I inform myself. 

Yes, indeed, it was that very one! What was interesting was that I received a follow-up note from "Emma" just last week, so (on the chance that she was an actual and earnest person) I emailed back a brief note explaining why I had not responded. She sent me a very nice email in response--much to my surprise!--and seemed genuinely grateful to me for explaining the differing meanings of "forensics" in English.

I actually thought originally that it was a legit invitation--before I realized that it was the wrong kind of forensics--because I do periodically receive invitations to participate in debate-related events in China and Korea, thanks to some international events that my team competed in.

And I'm kind of offended not to have ever been invited to submit to the Midwest Political Science Association conference! After all, I'm a teacher educator in the social sciences and everything!
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qrypt
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« Reply #21 on: May 20, 2011, 5:06:08 AM »

I've just received weird invitation, which is not obviously fraudulent -- but perhaps dodgy and at the very least weird.  The message is akin to the following h-net post

The message, offering a chance to participate in a two-week "Buddhism in China" tour, has several curious features.  It purports to be from someone called Sinkwan Cheng and contains a fair amount of puffery about how he is the editor of this or that book, has given lectures everywhere, received big grants, etc. -- all of which appears to be true.  The message begins by telling me how much he enjoyed a talk I gave at a recent conference in Romania -- and lo and behold Dr Cheng was indeed registered this conference.  (I was amazed to see this when I had a look at the program -- it would have been easy for someone to simply cull names from the on-line program, and I assumed that's how he got to me.) 

The strange thing is, they say accommodation breakfast and lunch are provided, and the only fee is $150 for entry to cultural sites.  So it isn't clear that it's a money-spinner. 

There are other oddities.  We're instructed to contact a Dr Yifa at an email address at the "University of the West" -- which appears to be a properly accredited university -- but a search at the uwest.edu website for "Yifa" produces no results; there is an alternative gmail address for this Dr Yifa (and the message from Cheng is likewise from a gmail account).

The absence of a big fee is surprising; we are apparently not in ORTland here.  Anyway I'm not interested in participating in this thing (among other things, if I disappeared for two weeks in July it would be the end my marriage...).  I'm only curious to know whether anyone has heard of it & has thoughts on whether it is somehow legitimate. 
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txloopnlil
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« Reply #22 on: June 16, 2011, 8:33:06 PM »

Common Ground Publishing Journals?  Our dean keeps forwarding conference invitations that seem linked to this publisher.  The latest is Science in Society http://science-society.com/conference-2011/.  Are these legitimate or not?
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socsci
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« Reply #23 on: June 16, 2011, 10:46:33 PM »

Common Ground Publishing Journals?  Our dean keeps forwarding conference invitations that seem linked to this publisher.  The latest is Science in Society http://science-society.com/conference-2011/.  Are these legitimate or not?

I am negative on this group. The only way you can publish in their journals is by attending the conference or virtually attending the conference (for this particular one, the fees are $550 and $450, respectively). There is no way to publish without paying, which to me makes their journals illegitimate.

Interestingly, Common Ground is based at the School of Education at University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, the same place where Oxford Round Table founder Kern Alexander currently teaches. Must be something in the water.
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niceday
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« Reply #24 on: June 18, 2011, 1:56:35 PM »

Common Ground is absolutely a vanity press and I suspect just a money-making scheme for the two people who show up as editors for *every* *single* *journal* no matter the subject: humanites, social sciences, climate change. You name it, they are the editors.:

    * Mary Kalantzis, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA.
    * Bill Cope, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, USA.

Here you go.

Journal of Aging? Editor: Bill Cope. http://agingandsociety.com/Journal/

Journal of Arts in Society? Editor: Bill Cope and Mary Kalantzis. http://artsinsociety.com/Journal/

Journal of Climate Change? Of course, Bill Cope is one of the two editors. http://on-climate.com/Journal/

Journal of Design Principles? You got it. Editors are Bill Cope and Mary Kalantzis. http://designprinciplesandpractices.com/Journal/

Food Studies. Who else? Editor is Bill Cope. http://food-studies.com/Journal/  

Museums? Bill Cope and Amareswar Galla (who seems to be their third minor player). http://onmuseums.com/Journal/

Sport and Society? Bill Cope and Keith Gilbert. http://techandsoc.com/Journal/

Journal of Technology, Knowledge and Society? Editors: Bill Cope and Mary Kalantzis. http://techandsoc.com/Journal/

In fact, look at every journal they supposedly "publish" in return for exorbitant conference fees and you will find those two are either the whole editorial board or have roped in one more person.

http://commongroundpublishing.com/

Those two know everything about everything.

Scam, scam, scam. And shameful because University of Illinois-Urbana should be doing a better job policing this scam originating in their school of education.

Common Ground Publishing Journals?  Our dean keeps forwarding conference invitations that seem linked to this publisher.  The latest is Science in Society http://science-society.com/conference-2011/.  Are these legitimate or not?

I am negative on this group. The only way you can publish in their journals is by attending the conference or virtually attending the conference (for this particular one, the fees are $550 and $450, respectively). There is no way to publish without paying, which to me makes their journals illegitimate.

Interestingly, Common Ground is based at the School of Education at University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, the same place where Oxford Round Table founder Kern Alexander currently teaches. Must be something in the water.
Common Ground Publishing Journals?  Our dean keeps forwarding conference invitations that seem linked to this publisher.  The latest is Science in Society http://science-society.com/conference-2011/.  Are these legitimate or not?

I am negative on this group. The only way you can publish in their journals is by attending the conference or virtually attending the conference (for this particular one, the fees are $550 and $450, respectively). There is no way to publish without paying, which to me makes their journals illegitimate.

Interestingly, Common Ground is based at the School of Education at University of Illinois-Urbana Champaign, the same place where Oxford Round Table founder Kern Alexander currently teaches. Must be something in the water.
« Last Edit: June 18, 2011, 1:57:20 PM by niceday » Logged
txloopnlil
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« Reply #25 on: June 19, 2011, 2:30:37 PM »

Thanks!  Common Ground looked rather dodgy on first glance, but this is absurd.   The Oxford Round Table guy and this crew are all at University of Illinois-Urbana - very interesting....

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questor1
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« Reply #26 on: June 19, 2011, 4:12:19 PM »

Before the electronic journals took off, there were over 70,000 scholarly or academic journals not to mention conferences and proceedings in the millions. Go to any big city or major resort hotel and see the list of conferences being held. Each person has to size up what is legit and what isn't and what purpose that journal or conference serves in their career. Can't always judge by title, source, editor or age (some of the e-journals and newer conferences are young but strong). Some previously well established in-person conferences are dwindling or merging or meeting every other year or changing their name.
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mouseman
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« Reply #27 on: June 19, 2011, 11:27:03 PM »

Before the electronic journals took off, there were over 70,000 scholarly or academic journals not to mention conferences and proceedings in the millions. Go to any big city or major resort hotel and see the list of conferences being held. Each person has to size up what is legit and what isn't and what purpose that journal or conference serves in their career. Can't always judge by title, source, editor or age (some of the e-journals and newer conferences are young but strong). Some previously well established in-person conferences are dwindling or merging or meeting every other year or changing their name.

Yes, but as I wrote here http://chronicle.com/forums/index.php/topic,79805.0.html some conferences are truly scams.  If no names are given for the program committee, no venue is given for the  conference, and the only information on thee entire conference website is where you should send the registration fee, well, I'm pretty sure that it is a scam.  I mean that your $800 application  fee is going to somebody's bank account, and if you actually get to Montreal, China, or Inner Mongolia, you won't find any conference going on. 

There are also conferences out there that are academically meaningless, like the ORT, but have actual venues and talks.  I wouldn't actually call them scams, because you pay for something and you get it.  However, they are a bit dodgy, like somebody selling you a car like a Ford Taurus for twice the price of a Taurus, calling it a Roll's Roice, and using the Rolls Royce factory as a backdrop to photos of the car.  You're paying for a car, you're getting a car, and they never actually tell you that it's a Rolls, you just get that impression from the brochure and the ads.
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totoro
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« Reply #28 on: June 20, 2011, 6:58:06 AM »

And Kalantzis is supposedly the Dean of Education...
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questor1
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« Reply #29 on: June 20, 2011, 10:53:06 AM »

Mouseman, You are right there are some definite scams, extreme examples to be avoided and there are a lot of quasi ones. Many of the respected ones overcharge for registration and pocket it to run their organizations for the rest of the year. Is that a scam or not? Others charge exhibitors for their tables and let friends have free tables.

One of the worst scams I heard of was a colleague expected the conference to be held in a hotel and it ended up in a Brooklyn apartment with three or four people. Talk about shock!
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