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Author Topic: Get a PhD or not?  (Read 1465 times)
rickblaine
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« on: January 04, 2013, 12:44:03 PM »

Good evening. I currently work in the Middle East and am thinking about returning to the US to do a PhD program at a large state university in a TESOL-related subject. I don't need the doctorate to get a good job since I have a good one now. My goal would be to return to the Middle East with more teaching opportunities (with fewer teaching hours and better students than I have now). I enjoy being in an academic environment but still want to teach rather than crank out research articles. I know that research is a big part of academia in the US.

I'm very ambivalent about the whole subject. I look forward to your responses.

Thanks,
RB, American expat
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kangaroo
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« Reply #1 on: January 04, 2013, 1:27:08 PM »

If you are ambivalent, the answer is definitely no.
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frogfactory
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« Reply #2 on: January 05, 2013, 4:13:50 PM »

Gotta agree.  If you do conclude you must get the PhD, go do it in a country where it takes a sane amount of time (ie, not the US)
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At the end of the day, sometimes you just have to masturbate in the bathroom.
sockdolager
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« Reply #3 on: January 05, 2013, 6:34:13 PM »

Gotta agree.  If you do conclude you must get the PhD, go do it in a country where it takes a sane amount of time (ie, not the US)

Although this may not be the best idea if the OP is not interested in research, since shorter PhDs tend to exclusively involve research with no coursework.
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lightningstrike
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« Reply #4 on: January 06, 2013, 12:15:05 AM »

If you are ambivalent, the answer is definitely no.

The advisory is so simple, yet it is probably the best advice that can be given to the OP.
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nezahualcoyotl
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« Reply #5 on: January 06, 2013, 3:35:59 AM »

If you are ambivalent, the answer is definitely no.

+1. Especially if you're not interested in research and you already have a good job.
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'Education is like a venereal disease; it makes you unsuitable for many jobs, and then you have the urge to pass it on.'
-Terry Pratchett

I do solemnly swear to obey all the laws of thermodynamics.
shamu
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« Reply #6 on: January 07, 2013, 1:08:57 AM »

A PhD is a research degree, and it sounds like you don't even need it.

If you just need the title, I am sure you will find the path of the least resistance. Then again, those "PhDs" tend to be really pretty worthless, like a degree  from a "prestigious unaccredited" university. Ugh.
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polly_mer
practice makes perfect
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Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #7 on: January 07, 2013, 9:45:25 AM »

Gotta agree.  If you do conclude you must get the PhD, go do it in a country where it takes a sane amount of time (ie, not the US)

Although this may not be the best idea if the OP is not interested in research, since shorter PhDs tend to exclusively involve research with no coursework.

One can do "short" degrees in the US if one picks carefully.  However, yes, those are research degrees based on research productivity from the first semester.
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I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
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