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Author Topic: Independent Scholars Support Thread  (Read 198845 times)
ayellesse
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« Reply #90 on: October 07, 2009, 11:16:54 PM »

Very glad I found this thread.

I have completed my dissertation in the social sciences and do not plan on seeking an academic position. I plan to continue to research and write (and hopefully publish), however, my research involves human subjects. How does one conduct this type of research without a university IRB and legal support? Are there any independent scholars who do human subject research?

Thanks for sharing your expertise with this new independent scholar.
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bibliothecula
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like Bunnicula, only with books


« Reply #91 on: October 08, 2009, 2:21:05 PM »

Very glad I found this thread.

I have completed my dissertation in the social sciences and do not plan on seeking an academic position. I plan to continue to research and write (and hopefully publish), however, my research involves human subjects. How does one conduct this type of research without a university IRB and legal support? Are there any independent scholars who do human subject research?

Thanks for sharing your expertise with this new independent scholar.

Can you affiliate with a local college or university just for the purpose of using their IRB board? Maybe for an annual fee?
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I came. I saw. I cited.
drgunn
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« Reply #92 on: November 19, 2009, 5:50:53 PM »

Great thread!  I'm here to announce myself as an independent scientist.  I'm currently establishing myself as a scientific consultant to biotech and supporting myself with some consulting work for science-related startups such as Mendeley and BioKM on the side.  I also know quite a few people in the DIYBio community, which has taken off recently and has a fair amount of good ideas for independent scientists.
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safron
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« Reply #93 on: December 23, 2009, 10:32:38 PM »

Posting so to be following this thread.
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lorem_ipsum
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« Reply #94 on: January 17, 2010, 1:46:16 PM »

I'm an independent scholar who has been reading the fora for a while now and finally decided to take the step out of lurker-dom. It's definitely an uphill struggle at times to keep up with research and work an unrelated FT job as well (though I'm in a publishing/editorial field, so at least I can keep my editing and revising skills sharp). I'm fortunate to live in a large city with access to libraries that have JSTOR and all of the databases, which certainly makes the researching easier. My first article (carved out of my undergraduate honours thesis) was published this past year(!), and I'm slowly revising two other articles from past conferences for journal submission sometime in 2010.

I presented at two conferences in 2009, and am looking at attending a major disciplinary conference (but not presenting) and submitting an abstract to a smaller specialised conference in 2010. For other independent scholars, how many conferences per year do you submit papers to, or attend?
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enipeus
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« Reply #95 on: April 01, 2010, 10:36:35 PM »

Would anyone happen to have any thoughts on the following questions?

1) To deal with a lack of affiliation, would it ever make sense to set up a small company under which one would submit manuscripts? ("XYZ Research," or whatever).  Or would this usually just look weird?  I guess this might be very field dependent.  I'm mainly thinking along the lines of the humanities or sciences.

2) If one were between jobs and thus completely flexible when it comes to geography, might it make sense to consider moving to a university-heavy area to (hopefully) eventually become affiliated with a school through adjuncting etc? (assuming that the tenure-track market in one's field is currently too competitive to count on, and assuming that getting an affiliation is a top priority).
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drgunn
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« Reply #96 on: April 02, 2010, 12:21:21 AM »

Not only is that not weird, but that's exactly what many/most consultants do, at least in the life sciences.  If I were to move, I'd consider somewhere where there's an academic community that stretches between academia and industry. You may find that an institutional affiliation isn't quite as important if people have dual roles, as opposed to being strictly university based.
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totoro
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« Reply #97 on: April 02, 2010, 1:29:35 AM »

What I don't understand is why most universities seem to be so reluctant/stingy to make someone a research associate or visiting fellow or whatever the term they use on an open ended basis. Often they'll allow it for one year at a time only. Why don't they want to get free publications for the price of access to their library etc? I'm currently a "visiting fellow" after having been on a one year research contract at my current university (during which I was a full regular employee). But they only gave me 6 months and the rules don't seem to favor longer periods.
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enipeus
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« Reply #98 on: April 02, 2010, 6:26:57 PM »

Sounds good, drgunn.  I've noticed a few consulting-type affiliations in my own field so this just might be a viable option after all, especially for established workers.

totoro: I think some schools see affiliations (for otherwise unaffiliated and unsupported scholars) as 1) potentially abusive of scholars [by allowing schools to "exploit" the productivity of active scholars without having to pay them]; and 2) a cheap way to undercut and potentially diminish certain roles of genuine faculty members.  More likely, reticence in the setting up of affiliations probably relates to mundane things related to paperwork hassles etc.
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lorem_ipsum
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« Reply #99 on: April 07, 2010, 4:04:45 PM »

1) To deal with a lack of affiliation, would it ever make sense to set up a small company under which one would submit manuscripts? ("XYZ Research," or whatever).  Or would this usually just look weird?  I guess this might be very field dependent.  I'm mainly thinking along the lines of the humanities or sciences.

I think it would look odd in my particular area (straddling humanities and social sciences) -- the term 'independent scholar' is a lot more likely to be recognised/accepted than 'XYZ Research', at least for publication or conference paper submissions. However, setting up an XYZ Research name might make more sense for STEM areas, and in business-related disciplines like marketing or finance I think it would be a very good idea.
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azsundevil
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« Reply #100 on: March 21, 2011, 5:25:27 PM »

This is the perfect thread! I was looking for something along the lines of how to get your research noticed if you weren't in academia. I am a grad student (masters) with no interest in an academic career.

My masters thesis project is potentially marketable and I would like to pursue that after graduating, but I found out that when I signed up for grad school I signed a note as part of my contract with the U that allowed the U a % ownership of anything I invented during my time in school. I find it funny that I am paying to go to the U and the U, in return, can take a portion of any profits I make on my invention -- even after I made an effort to make sure no U materials and equipment were used.  The U has the similar rules for employees.

I would sure like to find a way around this!   

BTW, I like the "Independent Scholar" business card ideas.   


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emetam
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« Reply #101 on: April 16, 2011, 1:56:26 PM »

I'm grateful for the Chronicle of Higher Ed. This is a wonderful thread. Secret weapon, thanks for starting this discussion. It's due to threads like these that I have not lost my mind. It's depressing to be jobless with a doctorate degree.
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renaissoxx
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« Reply #102 on: May 04, 2011, 10:44:58 AM »

I don't think that the academic network in it's current form will be relevant for much longer.  Independent scholarship will be the norm, and there will be no bias towards currently understood ideas.  There might be plenty of teaching positions and social networking among academics, but eventually a system will be created that will be insulated from this and anyone who has the most logical interpretation of experimental data will be able to contribute to the current state of human knowledge.  Once this happens we will experience a burst of advancement.
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cs_dude
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« Reply #103 on: November 16, 2011, 10:24:59 AM »

How difficult is it to get an institutional affiliation if you have a terminal degree in the field, have taught for several years and at least published a modest amount but currently are not employed at a U? I am in a STEM field.

Also, if you had a tenure-track job offer for next fall, but no job now, would it be a strange request to ask for an affiliation now with the new school during negotiations? Or difficult for them to grant this? (This is a primarily teaching oriented school in case that makes a difference). That way publications between now and then could also count toward meeting tenure stipulations I would assume.

I assume it would be nearly impossible to get any sort of academic affiliation without an offer from any place.

I hope this also revives this interesting thread.
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heptameron
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« Reply #104 on: February 20, 2012, 9:31:59 PM »

cs__dude,
Did you ever receive a response to your query?
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