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Author Topic: Doctoral Specializations - Not Recognized on Transcripts  (Read 3159 times)
arizona
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« Reply #15 on: December 24, 2012, 10:27:57 PM »

You seem to really, really want this to matter, but it simply doesn't.

The first paragraph in your cover letter will have a line saying that you got your PhD in Basket Weaving from University Y, where you specialized in East Sumerian Reeds (or however you want to phrase it). Your transcript is not the first (or second or third) place anyone is going to look to find out your area of specialization. In many cases, the transcript is simply an HR requirement and not something the search committee cares a whit about.

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anonymous62901
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« Reply #16 on: December 24, 2012, 11:42:43 PM »


If you do a doctorate in ID in a program that happens to be housed within a department of Curriculum and Instruction, it is still a doctorate in ID. It is not a doctorate in a related field--truly; it is your major. I don't know how much--or how little--this person knew about your program, but did she know what you program of study looks like?

Actually the major is Education with a concentration in Curriculum and Instruction for  Instructional Deign and Technology.  The department then makes you choose one of 9 specialty areas (subspecializations) within Curriculum and Instruction one of which is Instructional Technology.  The diploma and transcript will say Education (Curriculum and Instruction).   

A person who has a specializes in Special Education would have a major in Education and a concentration in Educational Psychology indicated on their transcript.  Their diploma and transcript will say Education (Educational Psychology).   
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msparticularity
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« Reply #17 on: December 24, 2012, 11:45:41 PM »

You seem to really, really want this to matter, but it simply doesn't.

The first paragraph in your cover letter will have a line saying that you got your PhD in Basket Weaving from University Y, where you specialized in East Sumerian Reeds (or however you want to phrase it). Your transcript is not the first (or second or third) place anyone is going to look to find out your area of specialization. In many cases, the transcript is simply an HR requirement and not something the search committee cares a whit about.



It will matter in education to the degree that the SC wants to determine what courses the OP took, since taking a course at the graduate level is often considered to be the measure of competence to teach it. Beyond that, though, yeah--no one cares what the name of the degree is, and there is enormous variation from institution to institution as to the meaning of any particular degree name.  


If you do a doctorate in ID in a program that happens to be housed within a department of Curriculum and Instruction, it is still a doctorate in ID. It is not a doctorate in a related field--truly; it is your major. I don't know how much--or how little--this person knew about your program, but did she know what you program of study looks like?

Actually the major is Education with a concentration in Curriculum and Instruction for  Instructional Deign and Technology.  The department then makes you choose one of 9 specialty areas (subspecializations) within Curriculum and Instruction one of which is Instructional Technology.  The diploma and transcript will say Education (Curriculum and Instruction).   

A person who has a specializes in Special Education would have a major in Education and a concentration in Educational Psychology indicated on their transcript.  Their diploma and transcript will say Education (Educational Psychology).   

Yes, I know. See the comments above: all that matters is your actual work--not the name of the degree.
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cajunmama
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« Reply #18 on: December 26, 2012, 10:44:05 AM »

The OP's question intrigues me since my situation is similar. Please tell me if I have this right:

I am pursuing a doctorate in Alphabet Engineering with a concentration in ABC Engineering and a specialization in B Engineering with research in B Engineering and teaching experience in lower level ABC Engineering and upper level B Engineering. I could apply for any job listing:

PhD in ABC Engineering with a focus in B Engineering
PhD in B Engineering
with or without "or closely related degree"
or some sort of variation on that theme?

SC will look at what I actually did concerning ABC and B Engineering, not at the "Alphabet Engineering" written on my transcript. Am I on the right track?
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lightningstrike
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« Reply #19 on: December 26, 2012, 11:04:43 AM »

Specializations indicated on a transcript? Don't make me laugh. Spend your energy on getting peer-reviewed PUBLICATIONS in your field of specialization and quit obsessing about mini-credentials in your field of specialization.
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octoprof
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« Reply #20 on: December 26, 2012, 11:11:32 AM »

The OP's question intrigues me since my situation is similar. Please tell me if I have this right:

I am pursuing a doctorate in Alphabet Engineering with a concentration in ABC Engineering and a specialization in B Engineering with research in B Engineering and teaching experience in lower level ABC Engineering and upper level B Engineering. I could apply for any job listing:

PhD in ABC Engineering with a focus in B Engineering
PhD in B Engineering
with or without "or closely related degree"
or some sort of variation on that theme?

SC will look at what I actually did concerning ABC and B Engineering, not at the "Alphabet Engineering" written on my transcript. Am I on the right track?

Yes. The SC will look at degree conferred and courses taken.
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baleful_regards
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« Reply #21 on: December 26, 2012, 2:18:45 PM »

Cajunmama, you will address how you "fit" the job requirements via your cover letter.

We all know that the "wording" of degrees can vary wildly. Mine says nothingabout my specialization, yet that specialization is evident through my dissertation and subsequent publications/job history.
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cajunmama
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« Reply #22 on: December 26, 2012, 3:30:02 PM »

Thanks, ya'll.

My particular specialty crosses a few fields and it is conceivable that I may end up in something other than engineering,  BUT people in those fields understand that, so I guess I'll be fine. One less thing to worry about, and it is a few years down the road, but I'm a Planner so thinking long term is par for the course.
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lyndonparker
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« Reply #23 on: December 28, 2012, 11:12:11 AM »

I think , OP, the Fora is telling you that it is not the big deal you believe it to be.

I think, OP, that given the multitude of years of experience in academic job seeking, advising and serving on search committees being communicated through the responses that you would be well served to listen rather than tilt at this windmill of no consequence.



Members of search committees are aware that doctoral programs have different titles and names for similar fields of study. Certain schools (especially those in the South, in my experience) have very traditional course titles. Those in other regions of the country have trendy names for essentially the same course (or major field of study). We understand that. As others have stated, you address this in your cover letter, in your CV, and your referees discuss this in their letters.
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lyndonparker
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« Reply #24 on: December 28, 2012, 11:13:07 AM »

I think , OP, the Fora is telling you that it is not the big deal you believe it to be.

I think, OP, that given the multitude of years of experience in academic job seeking, advising and serving on search committees being communicated through the responses that you would be well served to listen rather than tilt at this windmill of no consequence.



Members of search committees are aware that doctoral programs have different titles and names for similar fields of study. Certain schools (especially those in the South, in my experience) have very traditional course titles. Those in other regions of the country have trendy names for essentially the same course (or major field of study). We understand that. As others have stated, you address this in your cover letter, in your CV, and your referees discuss this in their letters.
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Lyndon always has such a nice succinct way of putting things.
higheredlover2012
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« Reply #25 on: December 28, 2012, 12:56:40 PM »

The thing that I notice as I read through the posts is when OP explains that Curriculum and Instruction (C & I)and Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy.) have many specializations.  The C & I specialities appear to be
subfields of C & I.  There is one subfield under the Ed. Psy. program that I do not see as fitting. Special education does not seem to me like it would be a subfield of Educational Psychology. OP states a student who specializes in special education earns an Educational Psychology doctorate.  To me the special education and the educational pyschology are related, but separate fields. 

Of course, I think the OP may have been studying Instructional Design (ID).  Maybe OP thinks that should be more of an Ed. Psy. specialty/subfield.  I think Instructional Design could truly work as a subfield under C & I or Ed. Psy.     

I think that the fora is generally correct, but there may be reason for some concern in cases when the specialization is not perceived as a true subfield of what is listed on the transcript.

 




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msparticularity
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« Reply #26 on: December 28, 2012, 3:11:56 PM »

The thing that I notice as I read through the posts is when OP explains that Curriculum and Instruction (C & I)and Educational Psychology (Ed. Psy.) have many specializations.  The C & I specialities appear to be
subfields of C & I.  There is one subfield under the Ed. Psy. program that I do not see as fitting. Special education does not seem to me like it would be a subfield of Educational Psychology. OP states a student who specializes in special education earns an Educational Psychology doctorate.  To me the special education and the educational pyschology are related, but separate fields. 

Of course, I think the OP may have been studying Instructional Design (ID).  Maybe OP thinks that should be more of an Ed. Psy. specialty/subfield.  I think Instructional Design could truly work as a subfield under C & I or Ed. Psy.     

I think that the fora is generally correct, but there may be reason for some concern in cases when the specialization is not perceived as a true subfield of what is listed on the transcript.

 

In the case of that particular institution, the degree for someone in SpEd is in education, not in Ed Psych; it is just the department that is listed as ed psych. SpEd is one of those fields--like ID--that exists variously under C&I, Ed Psych, and as a freestanding program. It's not actually all that unusual to find it in Ed Psych, either, since educational measures/metrics is in Ed Psych, and SpEd is pretty heavily grounded in that area these days.
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"Once admit that the sole verifiable or fruitful object of knowledge is the particular set of changes that generate the object of study...and no intelligible question can be asked about what, by assumption, lies outside." John Dewey

"Be particular." Jill Conner Browne
anonymous62901
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« Reply #27 on: December 28, 2012, 8:46:31 PM »

In the case of that particular institution, the degree for someone in SpEd is in education, not in Ed Psych; it is just the department that is listed as ed psych. SpEd is one of those fields--like ID--that exists variously under C&I, Ed Psych, and as a freestanding program. It's not actually all that unusual to find it in Ed Psych, either, since educational measures/metrics is in Ed Psych, and SpEd is pretty heavily grounded in that area these days.
[/quote]

A doctoral student who specializes in special education at SIU will have a transcript that says Ph. D. in Education (Educational Psychology). SIU offers the Ph. D. in Education with a concentration in Educational Psychology.  The diplomas and transcripts say Education and the name of the concentration. In this case it would say a Ph. D. in Education (Educational Psychology).  Special education is a specialty area within the Educational Psychology concentration.  The Illinois Board of Higher Education (IBHE) gives the Ph. D. in Education (Educational Psychology) a CIP number of 42.2806 and lists it as a Ph. D. in Education (Educational Psychology) in the searchable program inventory.  A CIP of 42.2806 corresponds to a degree in Educational Psychology. 
     
The department name is Educational Psychology and Special Education. 

 





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higheredlover2012
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« Reply #28 on: December 28, 2012, 9:31:48 PM »

I looked at pages 2-3 of the online graduate catalog of Southern Illinois University (Carbondale).  They do not appear to offer a Ph. D. in Education at first glance.  

They list doctoral degrees in these educational fields:  Curriculum and Instruction, Educational Administration, Educational Psychology, Health Education, and Workforce Education and Development rather than a Ph. D. in Education per se.

There are references to the doctor of philosophy in education when you go to each department. There is also a section in the catalog devoted to the doctor of philosophy in education.  The section on the doctor of philosophy in education calls Curriculum and Instruction, Educational Administration, Educational Psychology, Health Education, and Workforce Education and Development concentrations.  

The graduate catalog on page 3 makes it appear to be five different Ph. D. majors.  The doctor of education section make it look like one major Education with five different concentrations.

It is hard to tell what the name of Ph. D. program is from the graduate catalog.  



« Last Edit: December 28, 2012, 9:35:31 PM by higheredlover2012 » Logged
msparticularity
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« Reply #29 on: December 28, 2012, 10:15:55 PM »

I looked at pages 2-3 of the online graduate catalog of Southern Illinois University (Carbondale).  They do not appear to offer a Ph. D. in Education at first glance.  

They list doctoral degrees in these educational fields:  Curriculum and Instruction, Educational Administration, Educational Psychology, Health Education, and Workforce Education and Development rather than a Ph. D. in Education per se.

There are references to the doctor of philosophy in education when you go to each department. There is also a section in the catalog devoted to the doctor of philosophy in education.  The section on the doctor of philosophy in education calls Curriculum and Instruction, Educational Administration, Educational Psychology, Health Education, and Workforce Education and Development concentrations.  

The graduate catalog on page 3 makes it appear to be five different Ph. D. majors.  The doctor of education section make it look like one major Education with five different concentrations.

It is hard to tell what the name of Ph. D. program is from the graduate catalog.  


I can positively assure you that the degree is a PhD in education; I have been the external member for doctoral committees there. The department (which may or may not be synonymous with the concentration) is listed on the transcript, but not on the diploma. Concentrations are major areas of study that have been approved and are recognized at the university level, and include, as noted above, SpEd. Typically, these are created when there are a couple of major areas under one departmental "roof." In the case of other specializations, such as math ed within C&I, the concentration has not been submitted to the university for approval because the differentiation is not considered essential, and setting it in stone in that way is not desirable.

The thing is, none of this really matters. In the cases where programs are accredited for professional licensure (counseling, SpEd, rrehab, and social work programs, for example), such licensure is granted by the state or some external entity based upon the completion of courses and other requirements such as internships and/or exams. Please not that the name of the department and/or program is completely irrelevant. In cases where the program is primarily a preparation for a professional or academic position, coursework, research, and experience--not to mention letters of recommendation--are what determines qualifications. Again, the name of the program or concentration is not an issue.

Okay, that's it; I'm done repeating the same thing. If anyone has any new comments or questions, I will be happy to try to respond.
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"Once admit that the sole verifiable or fruitful object of knowledge is the particular set of changes that generate the object of study...and no intelligible question can be asked about what, by assumption, lies outside." John Dewey

"Be particular." Jill Conner Browne
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