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Author Topic: So what have you read lately  (Read 964305 times)
llanfair
Still reading past her bedtime and Very
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Whither Canada?


« Reply #3795 on: December 09, 2012, 2:04:27 PM »

Isabella of Spain by William T. Walsh
Biography of the Queen of Spain, originally published in 1930

PM me if you'd like some suggestions for more recent stuff on Isabella, HMaria.
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Stop looking for zebras when the horse is already standing on your foot.
alastrina
I cannot believe I'm a
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WWW
« Reply #3796 on: December 10, 2012, 10:57:34 AM »

I finished Invisible Enemies: Stories of Infectious Disease by Jeanette Ferrell (which was recommended here) and enjoyed it. This morning I started The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (YA).

Up on deck after that is Between Barack and a Hard Place by Tim Wise.
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"One must always be careful of books," said Tessa, "and what is inside them, for words have the power to change us." -Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Angel
tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
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elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #3797 on: December 10, 2012, 7:04:29 PM »

Lately, I have been reading different blogs about women's fashion, particularly the high end women's fashion. I found this topic great.

I find you spammy.
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Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
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Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
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sprout
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« Reply #3798 on: December 10, 2012, 8:06:25 PM »

I finished Invisible Enemies: Stories of Infectious Disease by Jeanette Ferrell (which was recommended here) and enjoyed it.

I recently finished Asleep: The Forgotten Epidemic by Molly Caldwell Crosby.  About encephalitis lethargica in the first few decades of the twentieth century.  Some of the patients from this time period were encountered and treated by Oliver Sacks, as recorded in Awakenings.

I thought Asleep was really well-written and engaging and I'll be keeping an eye out for Ms. Crosby's book on yellow fever.
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alastrina
I cannot believe I'm a
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WWW
« Reply #3799 on: December 11, 2012, 10:15:13 AM »

I finished Invisible Enemies: Stories of Infectious Disease by Jeanette Ferrell (which was recommended here) and enjoyed it.

I recently finished Asleep: The Forgotten Epidemic by Molly Caldwell Crosby.  About encephalitis lethargica in the first few decades of the twentieth century.  Some of the patients from this time period were encountered and treated by Oliver Sacks, as recorded in Awakenings.

I thought Asleep was really well-written and engaging and I'll be keeping an eye out for Ms. Crosby's book on yellow fever.

I'm impressed my public library has that. It's now on hold.
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"One must always be careful of books," said Tessa, "and what is inside them, for words have the power to change us." -Cassandra Clare, Clockwork Angel
arizona
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« Reply #3800 on: December 11, 2012, 1:46:15 PM »

I'm reading Bee Wilson's Consider the Fork: A History of How We Cook and Eat. Fascinating.
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history_grrrl
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« Reply #3801 on: December 11, 2012, 6:16:43 PM »

Well, I've finished Geraldine Brooks' Year of Wonders. I loved it, except for two things (okay, one is a love-hate thing). First, as with People of the Book, I found the "surprise ending" somewhat implausible. These endings make me feel a little cheated; it's like eating a gloriously rich and satisfying chocolate mousse and then discovering that the last delectable bites were sprayed with Reddi-Wip.

The second thing: there are many unfamiliar words in the text. They're not crucial to one's understanding, and sometimes you can figure out what they mean in context. But I find Brooks' writing so gorgeous that I want to read every word rather than skim. I finally hauled out a yellow highlighter and started highlighting words so I could look them up later. But although this is annoying, I also respect her desire to achieve historical authenticity. (However, I did look up one word that dates to 1720, and the novel is set in 1665-66, so . . . )

In any case, I am now reading March and enjoying it quite a bit, since I am an avid fan of Louisa May Alcott, have read Little Women voraciously several times, and am more familiar with the historical period covered here (and am very interested in the various reform movements of the 1840s-1860s).
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spork
If you are reading this, I am naked.
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« Reply #3802 on: December 11, 2012, 7:41:45 PM »

I just finished Napoleon's Egypt by Juan Cole. I liked it.

Also read One Month and a Day: A Detention Diary by Ken Saro-Wiwa. It was ok as a diary, but would have benefited from some editing. I read an out of print version; there's a newer version that might be better stylistically.
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a.k.a. gum-chewing monkey in a Tufts University jacket

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"Please do not force people who are exhausted to take medication for hallucinations." -- Memo from the Chair, Department of White Privilege Studies, Fiork University
mickeymantle
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« Reply #3803 on: December 12, 2012, 10:29:30 PM »


Finished reading Dickens's Dombrey and Son.  Interesting in parts, but I don't think I'll return to any of the novels I've recently read, except Barnaby Rudge.  But it was worth the effort.

Now undertaking the recent translation of The Tale of the Heike, considered the Japanese fourteenth-century counterpart to Genji.  Not easy to understand, but the overall atmosphere of resignation and action is compelling.
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prof_smartypants
Treasure-pilferin' and grog-swillin'
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You're getting hosed by small minds with no game.


« Reply #3804 on: December 13, 2012, 9:10:45 AM »

Just finished Kevin Baker's Paradise Alley. A brutal book. Too brutal for me, although very well written. I preferred the other two books in the series, Dreamland and Striver's Row

I have now moved on to Patchett's State of Wonder. Loving it. Can't put it down.
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dr_alcott
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« Reply #3805 on: December 13, 2012, 9:50:48 AM »

I have now moved on to Patchett's State of Wonder. Loving it. Can't put it down.

I couldn't put that one down either. When you finish, I'd like to hear your thoughts about the protagonist.
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You must be your own snow, Dr_Alcott.  You must lift, and sparkle, and then melt away.

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tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
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elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #3806 on: December 13, 2012, 11:35:21 AM »

I have now moved on to Patchett's State of Wonder. Loving it. Can't put it down.

I couldn't put that one down either. When you finish, I'd like to hear your thoughts about the protagonist.

Ooh, me too. I love Patchett, and I loved that book. Not quite as much as I loved Bel Canto, but close.
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Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
arizona
Senior member
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Posts: 778


« Reply #3807 on: December 13, 2012, 2:09:13 PM »

I have now moved on to Patchett's State of Wonder. Loving it. Can't put it down.

I couldn't put that one down either. When you finish, I'd like to hear your thoughts about the protagonist.

Ooh, me too. I love Patchett, and I loved that book. Not quite as much as I loved Bel Canto, but close.

Interesting. I found State of Wonder engaging while I was reading it, but I liked it less and less over time. ArizonaSpouse felt the same way: enjoyed reading it but was ultimately left kind of cold.
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prof_smartypants
Treasure-pilferin' and grog-swillin'
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 9,496

You're getting hosed by small minds with no game.


« Reply #3808 on: December 13, 2012, 3:22:41 PM »

I have now moved on to Patchett's State of Wonder. Loving it. Can't put it down.

I couldn't put that one down either. When you finish, I'd like to hear your thoughts about the protagonist.

Ooh, me too. I love Patchett, and I loved that book. Not quite as much as I loved Bel Canto, but close.

Interesting. I found State of Wonder engaging while I was reading it, but I liked it less and less over time. ArizonaSpouse felt the same way: enjoyed reading it but was ultimately left kind of cold.

I felt that way about bel canto. Hmmm.
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onthefringe
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« Reply #3809 on: December 13, 2012, 4:52:33 PM »

Brain dead in recovery from the semester, so the last few JD Robb In Death books. So formulaic, so comforting. I'll read something real over Christmas.
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