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Author Topic: reality check?  (Read 5770 times)
msparticularity
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« Reply #15 on: December 10, 2012, 10:07:18 PM »

I've never been directly involved in an administrative hire (thankfully). But I didn't think that these jobs typically came with any additional perks other than the absurdly high salary that typically accompanies the job. I could be wrong, that's not uncommon.

The Dean theoretically controls the budget of the college, to some extent, and if the new Dean wanted more latitude or power or ability to make change, it would be with the college budget, right?


Here the typical administration ploy when planning an outside search for a new dean is (1) freeze the hires in the college for two or three years while a dozen people retire or leave so that (2) the new dean is promised the ability to hire ten new faculty in the first year, which (a) allows him/her to dispense favors to some of the departments that are pleading for someone to fill their empty line  while at the same time (b) the higher administration can permanently retrieve for its own uses the one-sixth of the college's usual budget for faculty hires (because only 10 instead of the missing 12 are replaced).

This fits what I've seen too. Admin likes to provide some largesse for new deans so that they can secure vassals and be seen as a champion. Our last one was knee-capped upon arrival and never gained the esteem necessary to lead.

You have left out the most significant source of the budget sweep: and all 10 of the missing 12 lines are full profs replaced with entry-level assistants.
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litdawg
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« Reply #16 on: December 11, 2012, 12:27:12 AM »

I've never been directly involved in an administrative hire (thankfully). But I didn't think that these jobs typically came with any additional perks other than the absurdly high salary that typically accompanies the job. I could be wrong, that's not uncommon.

The Dean theoretically controls the budget of the college, to some extent, and if the new Dean wanted more latitude or power or ability to make change, it would be with the college budget, right?


Here the typical administration ploy when planning an outside search for a new dean is (1) freeze the hires in the college for two or three years while a dozen people retire or leave so that (2) the new dean is promised the ability to hire ten new faculty in the first year, which (a) allows him/her to dispense favors to some of the departments that are pleading for someone to fill their empty line  while at the same time (b) the higher administration can permanently retrieve for its own uses the one-sixth of the college's usual budget for faculty hires (because only 10 instead of the missing 12 are replaced).

This fits what I've seen too. Admin likes to provide some largesse for new deans so that they can secure vassals and be seen as a champion. Our last one was knee-capped upon arrival and never gained the esteem necessary to lead.

You have left out the most significant source of the budget sweep: and all 10 of the missing 12 lines are full profs replaced with entry-level assistants.

Malleable entry-level assistants, at that. I don't think I've ever seen a senior hire in our college of letters, arts, and social sciences--but then we're an MA-granting institution. The assumption here is that a certain percentage of post-book scholars is only a requirement at doctoral granting institutions. Entry-level is the only hiring we do.
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spork
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« Reply #17 on: December 12, 2012, 2:40:47 PM »

I don't understand why anyone would think that doing a fancy-shmancy search for a dean would improve the status of a small college within a large research university, but that's water under the bridge.

If the new dean is great, that's good.

If the new dean is terrible, that's more ammunition for your argument that the search was a waste of resources.

But try not to poison the environment against the new dean before he or she gets established on campus.

Personally I'd be more up in arms about the loss of $80K annually. That's a faculty hire right there.

In general though, I agree with you.
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tenured_feminist
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« Reply #18 on: December 18, 2012, 4:49:48 PM »

Thanks, everyone. I think we have a decent plan for action that involves what ought to be a reasonable and do-able request for resources that exist. I suppose we could get shot down, but I think we have engineered the situation to make that politically costly.

Honestly, I do not want to go on the frakking job market, I really do not, but I'm becoming rather concerned about the long-term health of my institution, and this is a rather important indicator.

If the winning candidate is the one I expect it to be, no one will have any interest in poisoning the well for him. Au contraire, we are all -- for once -- on the same page of wanting to empower him. I suppose there is some value in having a common enemy. People who haven't spoken to each other in 20 years are linking arms and singing Solidarity Forever.
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edwidge
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« Reply #19 on: December 20, 2012, 2:13:55 PM »

Well, the newly-embraced solidarity is something, I suppose!
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