• June 25, 2016

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June 25, 2016, 8:19:52 am *
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News: Talk online about your experiences as an adjunct, visiting assistant professor, postdoc, or other contract faculty member.
 
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 1 
 on: Today at 08:16:36 am 
Started by mamselle - Last post by eulerian_ta
Turned on the news yesterday and there weren't  any people jumping out of skyscraper windows en masse in the financial sector.  Could George Soros and the rest of the money changers and banksters who fought the Brexit have been wrong?  Nah,  they couldn't have.  I'll be stocking my bunker with water and non-perishable food if anyone needs me.

 2 
 on: Today at 06:53:52 am 
Started by mickeymantle - Last post by marshwiggle
Quote
How has society come to the point where people feel some sort of moral imperative to "follow their dreams" so that being realistic and finding something which is neither immoral nor illegal and pays the rent is a "failure"?

This sentiment strikes me as victim blaming to some degree. Was he following his dreams, or was he investing a great deal of his own time and money in something he was being told from all angles would lead to a decent job?

His words were
Quote
I feel like a failure. I feel like I have no future. I feel like Iíve wasted my life trying to be earnest and idealistic.

The primary goal of a young adult is to become independent, meaning becoming financially self-sufficient. Being "earnest" is not as important as being honest about how things work and being "idealistic" should not prevent being realistic about one's options. The statement I quoted sounds similar to people who dedicate their lives to winning Olympic gold medals which they never achieve. There are factors outside our control which mean that any lofty goal we have may not be attainable in practice, and we must be able to adapt to life as it is.


Quote
Now he can't get a decent job to pay basic bills, and if anything his Masters or PhD just hurts his chances of being hired in most jobs outside of academia.

After investing so much time and money in what he thought would be a decent "career," you can't blame a father for then feeling like a failure when he feels he can't even provide adequately for his children.
You could say this same thing about Olympic hopefuls; they count on the medal and resulting fame to give them a career related to that. If they don't even make it to the Olympic team, they may feel like failures, but that is because they had a very narrowly-defined version of what they will accept for career options.

Someone who chooses a very narrow definition of "success" can be blamed; not for "failure", but for choosing such a restrictive idea of "success".

 3 
 on: Today at 05:13:24 am 
Started by academicpop - Last post by busyslinky
$20,000 less?  Don't take the VAP unless they match your current salary.  If they don't match it, don't take it.  If they match it, then you have an issue to consider.  I'd request a leave of absence and try the VAP, but only if the salary is the same or more than your current salary.

 4 
 on: Today at 04:17:00 am 
Started by mamselle - Last post by asymptotic
Now that people who led the charge for Leave are backing down from their claims, and some of the people who voted Leave are starting to regret their choices, I'm wondering whether the Government won't delay doing anything for a while, and then have the motion defeated in Parliament.
They were fools for believing any of that money would go to the NHS.

 5 
 on: Today at 04:05:57 am 
Started by cc_alan - Last post by scampster
AJ, thanks for the advice! I've discovered that my new office building has showers in it, so cycling to work might be more feasible now. Looking into mountain bikes might not be a bad idea around here, simply because we have a lot of gravel paths that we ride on recreationally.

 6 
 on: Today at 04:01:22 am 
Started by dr_dre - Last post by scampster
After pouting for a week for not getting tenure, I started sending out CV's like crazy in May. Much to my surprise, I have found myself a finalist at two schools in my preferred state, and based on the Chronicle's facts and figures, with higher average salaries then my current school.  I find it bizarre that not getting tenure might be the best thing that ever happened to my career.

That's awesome Sam!

 7 
 on: Today at 03:59:57 am 
Started by _touchedbyanoodle_ - Last post by scampster

I've convinced some friends to join me at my 55k, even though they'll be running the half-marathon distance. So that means a weekend getaway adventure, which makes it all the more exciting to look forward to. I've started weight training as well, both for general fitness and because this race has both stretches of deep sand (ugh) and some cliffs that will require scrambling. I need to make sure I have the upper- and lower-body strength to handle it all on top of the running.

You aren't messing around, are you?! I look forward to hearing about your journey!

 8 
 on: Today at 03:14:31 am 
Started by HMS_Surprise - Last post by babbinacara
There will be at least two years of staged changes--this kind of thing does not happen overnight. So current students will not withdraw en masse and leave (nor will they be expected to cough up overseas fees tomorrow). But going forward, we will see reduced numbers of applicants and incoming students from the EU, for sure.

Current EU faculty (and we have many at my place) will not be thrown out, but their lives just got a lot harder, what with work permits, queues at airports etc., coming (but again, not for two years or so). Hmm, kind of like my life was when I moved here from the US--I well remember those endless queues and near-daily hassles. Many EU staff may also gradually leave, and EU applicants for such new posts as we have will probably decline (though a job is a job...and there aren't many places in the EU where universities are expanding and mass hiring).


That is the UK side of things. Today the Euro people were advocating for a quick exit  (ie in the next year) to prevent other countries to follow the UK.

My understanding is that other EU countries' leaders are pushing the Cameron to invoke Lisbon/Article 50, which then triggers a two year period of negotiation on which terms the leaving country leaves. So even if it were invoked tomorrow, there would be a two year lag. Disgruntled EU leaders want it invoked now. Cameron wants to hang about and not invoke it at all, but let his successor do it in late summer/autumn.
My uni has already stated that current EU students and students accepted to begin this autumn will pay 'Home' fees (what EU students have paid until now) for the duration of their course.

 9 
 on: Today at 03:10:54 am 
Started by mickeymantle - Last post by polly_mer
Quote
How has society come to the point where people feel some sort of moral imperative to "follow their dreams" so that being realistic and finding something which is neither immoral nor illegal and pays the rent is a "failure"?

This sentiment strikes me as victim blaming to some degree. Was he following his dreams, or was he investing a great deal of his own time and money in something he was being told from all angles would lead to a decent job? Now he can't get a decent job to pay basic bills, and if anything his Masters or PhD just hurts his chances of being hired in most jobs outside of academia.

For at least twenty years, the cries have been deafening about the sheer number of people with graduate degrees in some fields who cannot get full-time faculty jobs.  

"Told from all angles would lead to a decent job" is just flat out false for anyone who has done any kind of reading on higher ed in the past 10 years instead of making up crap in their own head about possibilities.

I suppose someone could have been working on a graduate degree for 30 years, but that cannot be the majority based on the mean and median time to degrees reported annually.

In addition, that tired trope of a graduate degree hurting non-academic job chances also needs to be retired.  The disconnect is often between thinking that book learning alone somehow makes one highly qualified to start at the top or be paid very well to start at entry level instead of being realistic about one's skills and abilities in a way that one can be convincing of one's value to the employer.

 10 
 on: Today at 01:46:00 am 
Started by bluelephant - Last post by mouseman
I also understand that a personalized letter is much better than a generic one, even if the generic letter is glowing. I mean "Jane has amazing skills in analyzing complex data. In out last project which produced extremely complex results, Jane was able to tease out the important factors, blah blah blah", will probably have a higher weight than "Jane is an amazing researcher with extraordinary analysis skills, she is among my top 1% of students".

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