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Author Topic: Bang Your Head on Your Desk - the thread of teaching despair!  (Read 2038526 times)
ptarmigan
grad student & chief dork dumpling
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Posts: 4,142


« Reply #5265 on: February 23, 2012, 5:48:58 PM »

I can (by some miracle) see how you got '3 sin / pi' as your answer to 'sec pi/3', but...no. Just no. Please learn what the secant function is. You've already had two quizzes and an exam over this material, and any number of demonstrations from me in class.
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He's on my roster, but if I've taught him anything, it isn't math.
desmata
still here but mostly "over there".
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Posts: 1,670


« Reply #5266 on: February 23, 2012, 6:46:48 PM »

I have had The Onion show up on reference lists for assigned essays, as a 'serious' news source, often to back up arguments regarding political topics, and anti-abortion arguments.

I giggle in delight when a "friend of a friend" on Facebook comments on an Onion post as if it were factual.

My head banging moment today: A tenured colleague is chatting to me in our office. She notices an activity hand-out on my desk. One question has a demo graph showing a very straight forward concentration dependent curve. She says "Oh, I tell my students to ignore these graphs if they come across them in the text. They are too confusing to understand. I just explain it with words." This person teaches A&P to nursing students. WTH?
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If scientists invented the legal system, eye witness testimony would be inadmissible evidence. --Neil deGrasse Tyson
octoprof
Member-Moderator
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Posts: 45,173

Love your loved ones while you can.


WWW
« Reply #5267 on: February 23, 2012, 9:28:08 PM »

My head banging moment today: A tenured colleague is chatting to me in our office. She notices an activity hand-out on my desk. One question has a demo graph showing a very straight forward concentration dependent curve. She says "Oh, I tell my students to ignore these graphs if they come across them in the text. They are too confusing to understand. I just explain it with words." This person teaches A&P to nursing students. WTH?

<shriek!>
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Love your neighbor.
mathspice
On the elitist poop-head scale from 1-5, we give this
Senior member
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Posts: 786


« Reply #5268 on: February 23, 2012, 10:11:41 PM »

My head banging moment today: A tenured colleague is chatting to me in our office. She notices an activity hand-out on my desk. One question has a demo graph showing a very straight forward concentration dependent curve. She says "Oh, I tell my students to ignore these graphs if they come across them in the text. They are too confusing to understand. I just explain it with words." This person teaches A&P to nursing students. WTH?

<shriek!>

(Shriek) squared!
Logged

I'm teaching about honey, vinegar, and professionalism by example and it seems to work better for me than an exposition.
reener06
Just another
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Posts: 1,425


« Reply #5269 on: February 23, 2012, 10:18:06 PM »

My head banging moment today: A tenured colleague is chatting to me in our office. She notices an activity hand-out on my desk. One question has a demo graph showing a very straight forward concentration dependent curve. She says "Oh, I tell my students to ignore these graphs if they come across them in the text. They are too confusing to understand. I just explain it with words." This person teaches A&P to nursing students. WTH?

<shriek!>

(Shriek) squared!

Oh god. That's like telling historians to ignore the footnotes.
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galactic_hedgehog
Procrastinating, Python-quoting, Blue Blazer-drinking, chocolate-chip cookie-eating, Pastafarian, Not So
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Posts: 19,201

Mind Ninja


WWW
« Reply #5270 on: February 23, 2012, 10:56:00 PM »

Alan and I continue to share the brain.  Partial credit in my classes depends on whether someone who has been paying attention might start down that path.  So random numbers or equations are still no credit.  Going down a reasonable path, seeing it doesn't work, and abandoning it might be credit.

Example: What is the mass of a red car that is going 50 miles per hour east for 20 minutes on Mars and weighs 10000 newtons on Earth?

Writing W=mg is worth points because that's relevant as is F=ma.  Perhaps trying to convert the gravity on Mars would be useful or walking up from the law of universal gravitation.  However, calculating a as anything involving the speed of that car is not worth points since the relevant acceleration has nothing to do with how fast the car is going along the road.

Unless the car is going at a relativistic speed.

Do I get a smart aleck point?
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gennimom
Somewhat Southern (Have I really posted that much?)
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Posts: 18,467

Let's get summer over with! Me want snow!


« Reply #5271 on: February 23, 2012, 11:03:00 PM »

My head banging moment today: A tenured colleague is chatting to me in our office. She notices an activity hand-out on my desk. One question has a demo graph showing a very straight forward concentration dependent curve. She says "Oh, I tell my students to ignore these graphs if they come across them in the text. They are too confusing to understand. I just explain it with words." This person teaches A&P to nursing students. WTH?

<shriek!>

(Shriek) squared!

Oh god. That's like telling historians to ignore the footnotes.

We are NEVER going to fix what is wrong with education as long as we have people like this as teachers!
Logged

...only after reading gm's post, my new mantra is "always listen to gennimom".
Monday reeks! - Garfield
The outside of a horse is good for the inside of a person (or something like that).
barred_owl
Elegant yet understated
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 9,465


« Reply #5272 on: February 23, 2012, 11:07:09 PM »

My head banging moment today: A tenured colleague is chatting to me in our office. She notices an activity hand-out on my desk. One question has a demo graph showing a very straight forward concentration dependent curve. She says "Oh, I tell my students to ignore these graphs if they come across them in the text. They are too confusing to understand. I just explain it with words." This person teaches A&P to nursing students. WTH?

<shriek!>

(Shriek) squared!

Oh god. That's like telling historians to ignore the footnotes.

Egads!  Over on the "Favorite Conversations" thread, we were just talking about delusional nursing students, and how we "mean" professors expect them to know how to do things like, I dunno, interpret graphs or do unit conversions; the ones who don't know how to do such things fail our classes and the populace is spared from having incompetent nurses working on them.  Now I'm not so sure that's the case...
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...I can't help rooting for the underdog underbird.
desmata
still here but mostly "over there".
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,670


« Reply #5273 on: February 23, 2012, 11:16:47 PM »

My head banging moment today: A tenured colleague is chatting to me in our office. She notices an activity hand-out on my desk. One question has a demo graph showing a very straight forward concentration dependent curve. She says "Oh, I tell my students to ignore these graphs if they come across them in the text. They are too confusing to understand. I just explain it with words." This person teaches A&P to nursing students. WTH?

<shriek!>

(Shriek) squared!

Oh god. That's like telling historians to ignore the footnotes.

Egads!  Over on the "Favorite Conversations" thread, we were just talking about delusional nursing students, and how we "mean" professors expect them to know how to do things like, I dunno, interpret graphs or do unit conversions; the ones who don't know how to do such things fail our classes and the populace is spared from having incompetent nurses working on them.  Now I'm not so sure that's the case...
Fortunately, there are several additional levels to accomplish before these students are granted an RN. It is becoming apparent that rigor is widely variable even among the full time A&P faculty. I have been advocating for a departmental final in order to force lazy incompetents such as this person to adhere to the course competencies. 
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If scientists invented the legal system, eye witness testimony would be inadmissible evidence. --Neil deGrasse Tyson
mystictechgal
Happy in my "full, rich adulthood", and as a
Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 16,280

One step at a time


« Reply #5274 on: February 24, 2012, 4:23:34 AM »

My head banging moment today: A tenured colleague is chatting to me in our office. She notices an activity hand-out on my desk. One question has a demo graph showing a very straight forward concentration dependent curve. She says "Oh, I tell my students to ignore these graphs if they come across them in the text. They are too confusing to understand. I just explain it with words." This person teaches A&P to nursing students. WTH?

<shriek!>

(Shriek) squared!

Oh god. That's like telling historians to ignore the footnotes.

Egads!  Over on the "Favorite Conversations" thread, we were just talking about delusional nursing students, and how we "mean" professors expect them to know how to do things like, I dunno, interpret graphs or do unit conversions; the ones who don't know how to do such things fail our classes and the populace is spared from having incompetent nurses working on them.  Now I'm not so sure that's the case...
Fortunately, there are several additional levels to accomplish before these students are granted an RN. It is becoming apparent that rigor is widely variable even among the full time A&P faculty. I have been advocating for a departmental final in order to force lazy incompetents such as this person to adhere to the course competencies. 

Given all of the attention regarding retention I wonder if in-house clinics might be the answer. Required for things like vaccinations, blood work-ups, etc., and a required first stop before any outside health care will be covered by the uni's policy. Administrators and Trustees would have to accept care from whoever happens to be around at any given time. Professors would be required to be attended to by someone who passed their class. I'd bet that standards would go up and retention would take a back seat to quality. (Although even those numbers would rise exponentially if legislators were required to use then, too.) As an additional plus, health care costs would probably go way down, although increased liability insurance costs might more than make up for those savings, at least at first.

Y'know, that might make an interesting premise for a satire. <intrathreadularity>
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Quote
You must realize that a university cannot educate you. You must do that for yourself, although a college or university is the place where it is likely that you can study most efficiently.
http://www.lhup.edu/~dsimanek/chapman.htm

"Is all the same, only different" -- HL
polly_mer
practice makes perfect
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 37,447

Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #5275 on: February 24, 2012, 8:22:12 AM »

Alan and I continue to share the brain.  Partial credit in my classes depends on whether someone who has been paying attention might start down that path.  So random numbers or equations are still no credit.  Going down a reasonable path, seeing it doesn't work, and abandoning it might be credit.

Example: What is the mass of a red car that is going 50 miles per hour east for 20 minutes on Mars and weighs 10000 newtons on Earth?

Writing W=mg is worth points because that's relevant as is F=ma.  Perhaps trying to convert the gravity on Mars would be useful or walking up from the law of universal gravitation.  However, calculating a as anything involving the speed of that car is not worth points since the relevant acceleration has nothing to do with how fast the car is going along the road.

Unless the car is going at a relativistic speed.

Do I get a smart aleck point?

Is a car that is going 50 miles per hour and has a weight of 10000 N on Earth going at relativistic speeds?
Logged

I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
scienceprof
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,929


« Reply #5276 on: February 24, 2012, 8:44:01 AM »

Does anyone else find that apparently paragraphs have gone out of fashion?
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The plural of anecdote is not data
fancypants
is a great big meanie and a
Senior member
****
Posts: 406


« Reply #5277 on: February 24, 2012, 8:53:06 AM »

Does anyone else find that apparently paragraphs have gone out of fashion?

That just means that the more hip students will soon be using them ironically.
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You can lead them to water but you can't give them a functional brain.
writingprof
Senior member
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Posts: 387


« Reply #5278 on: February 24, 2012, 10:10:19 AM »

Does anyone else find that apparently paragraphs have gone out of fashion?

That just means that the more hip students will soon be using them ironically.


Coffee out the nose.  HOF'd.
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cgfunmathguy
Beer-brewing
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 7,793


« Reply #5279 on: February 24, 2012, 11:24:39 AM »

My head-banging moment today:

Slacker Baseball Player 1, 2, and 3 (SBP1, SBP2, and SBP3) are taking my College Algebra class and have only missed classes due to games. They sometimes cut up in class, but a stern look usually ends the horseplay. Today, SBP1 comes into class carrying his laptop (note: you are not allowed to use a laptop in my class without an accomodation letter from OSD), sits down right before class starts, and opens his laptop while my back is turned. I turn around, see the laptop open, and shake my head as SBP1 looks right at me. He closes the laptop. I continue with the lesson, and after about five or ten minutes, I stop to let people catch up.

CGFMG: Are there any questions so far? <waits for people to stop writing and shake their heads, which most do>
SBP1: I think I left my phone in the library. Can I go get it? <SBP2 and SBP3 both burst out laughing while the rest of the students and I get very surprised looks on our faces.>
CGFMG: That choice is yours. Make sure that you get the notes from someone.
SBP1: I'm going to go. You can mark me absent if you want.

That's the least I'm going to do. On Monday, SBPs and I are having a talk before class. I don't think they're going to appreciate what I have to say, but that's their problem, not mine.
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Alas, greatness and meaning are rarely coterminous with popular familiarity.
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