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Author Topic: faculty terrorist  (Read 48383 times)
david_perlmutter
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« Reply #15 on: January 26, 2012, 5:53:14 AM »

Private sector: One bad apple spoils the barrel.
Academia: One electric eel spoils the swim meet.
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"Derive happiness in oneself from a good day's work, from illuminating the fog that surrounds us." —Henri Matisse
shrek
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« Reply #16 on: January 26, 2012, 10:01:57 AM »

We call our faculty terrorist a troll-- but, since I AM a troll-- I think it's an insult to trolls-- I like faculty terrorist. We have one on my faculty, full professor with a named professorship, these things were given because otherwise they won't shut up. It's NOT the way to do things, my recommendation is to get rid of the terrorist.
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skeptical
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« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2012, 12:25:15 AM »

Good news: Faculty terrorist just received a "denial of tenure notice." I did a little happy dance.
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tuxedo_cat
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« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2012, 9:07:03 AM »

I will reiterate my earlier proposed theory that this colleague is someone who may be suffering from mental illness or some kind of disorder.  I suppose it's good for the overall working climate of your department that this person will be leaving soon, but I don't know that it's a great idea to be dancing on anyone's professional grave. 

For everyone's sake, I hope there is at least one person among the faculty who will maintain contact with this person to offer support as he or she makes a transition out of this institution.  I'm not sure I would want to be working with someone who is delusional, possibly mentally ill, and now perhaps ostracized by all colleagues -- even for a short period of time.
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skeptical
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« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2012, 6:40:44 PM »

I wasn't really celebrating this colleague's situation, but my own. I admit to being self-centered here, but it has been a very difficult three years for me.
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tuxedo_cat
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« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2012, 7:02:51 PM »

I wasn't really celebrating this colleague's situation, but my own. I admit to being self-centered here, but it has been a very difficult three years for me.

Ok -- fair enough!
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larryc
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« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2012, 1:06:22 AM »

When you get tightly wrapped up someone else's crazy, feelings of anger and sympathy can go back and forth in a way that is dizzying. On the one hand you can't help but see that they are a fellow human being, and hurting, and driven by compulsions that they never asked to have. On the other hand OMG I AM SO SICK OF YOUR SH1T. The longer a situation continues the less the sympathy.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2012, 1:07:14 AM by larryc » Logged

Trolling for sex is not what this forum is all about.
oldfullprof
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« Reply #22 on: March 09, 2012, 1:23:36 AM »

My chair at my last place was actually a sociopath.  Of course, he had tenure; I didn't.  If you mentioned him to people in health care for miles around, they'd look at the wall.  I think many, many people were afraid of him. 

Of course, everytime I hear Governor Cuomo on radio I think it's the same guy.
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Taste o' the Sixties
skeptical
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« Reply #23 on: March 09, 2012, 2:16:38 AM »

Thank you for absolution.
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_touchedbyanoodle_
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« Reply #24 on: March 09, 2012, 7:19:57 AM »

When you get tightly wrapped up someone else's crazy, feelings of anger and sympathy can go back and forth in a way that is dizzying. On the one hand you can't help but see that they are a fellow human being, and hurting, and driven by compulsions that they never asked to have. On the other hand OMG I AM SO SICK OF YOUR SH1T. The longer a situation continues the less the sympathy.

This. Exactly. I have someone else's crazy in my life right now, and I reached OMG state in just the last couple of weeks. I understand why this person is suffering, and I even understand why I am the target of this person's horribly inappropriate behavior, but still, I will be SO GLAD if we never work together again.
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"Inside every cynical person, there is a disappointed idealist." -George Carlin
oatmeal
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Posts: 607


« Reply #25 on: March 09, 2012, 7:39:29 AM »

OP--Thanks for the update. Just remember, though, that it is not over. That faculty member may appeal to the relevant faculty committee and then may bring a law suit. In both cases, say nothing about your opinions to anyone. Wait to see what happens. These things can turn ugly, particularly with a toxic colleague. Good luck. Just hope that the person does not appeal and goes quietly, with a one year terminal contract (that will be unpleasant enough for you and others).
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skeptical
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« Reply #26 on: March 10, 2012, 4:50:46 PM »

I know it's not over because I fully expect a lawsuit. The good news is that, mostly, the attorneys will have to deal with that. I've kept them in the loop throughout.
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dragoneyes
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« Reply #27 on: March 12, 2012, 11:37:38 PM »

Dear colleagues,

Hoping for a little related advice without outing myself.  I’m generally thought of as a friendly prof who is doing well enough with grants, research, teaching, and service.  I’ve heard “when you get tenure” not if.  But that’s where the bully comes in.  He’s a peer who abuses adjuncts, staff, and me – but tends to butter up the students.  I anticipated there was plenty of separation to just live and let live, but he’s gone back to complaining about “lack of contact” between me and him to supervisor (new) and higher up (looking to retire).   Some trusted senior folks tell me that most people know my bully for what he is, and that I should relax and be patient.  In the meantime, supervisors seem to just want to ignore the situation and arrange more meetings with crazyperson and myself.  I wish I could ignore the situation too, but as much as the bully hates me and criticizes me, he also seems to want to hang out more and create more drama to suck me into.  It’s wacky because the bully will be really nice to me, or at least not swear and throw things – then he will send an email to higher ups complaining about one of the many adjuncts he wants to fire, or complaining that I didn’t inform them of something.  Then when they are mean in person, they send nice friendly emails. What do you do with a stalker of this brand?  How do you survive a little longer until tenure?
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tuxedo_cat
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« Reply #28 on: March 13, 2012, 1:20:52 PM »

dragoneyes -- it's fine around here to extend a conversation on a given topic with a new query / new situation.  I'm going to suggest that you start your own thread, and perhaps use a subject line with the word "bully" rather than "terrorist."  Yes, I'm in a  language field, so I am less likely to take a casual view of how we label "problem" colleagues in our profession.  If you decide to do that, you can just repost here with a link to your new thread.
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skeptical
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Posts: 326


« Reply #29 on: March 13, 2012, 5:26:01 PM »

I disagree; I think there is a difference between a faculty terrorist and a bully. A faculty terrorist is not simply one who is mean to other faculty; a faculty terrorist is one whose primary goal is to bring down the department/college or whatever. In my case, my colleagues were the victims. Yes, I feel sorry for this colleague, but when the results of his or her behavior are such that several key faculty members are (a) afraid to come to the office lest they be subjected (as I noted) verbal and very public/slanderous attacks and/or (b) on the market to get out of a place that apparently condones such behavior.
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