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Author Topic: "Favorite" conversations with students  (Read 1539778 times)
polly_mer
practice makes perfect
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Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #6210 on: April 19, 2012, 8:06:24 AM »

I'd Google the sentence with the odd word changed for the correct one and see what turns up. Maybe I'm cynical, but an awful lot of thesaurus abuse seems to be committed in the name of "avoiding" (more like hiding) plagiarism. I'm wondering if the resistance to changing it is due to their knowledge that, once changed, the original that they ripped off will become more easily findable.

If this is the case, they'll then blame you for "making" them plagiarise, of course. If you'd let them keep the word they wanted it wouldn't be plagiarised, because it wouldn't have been an exact, word-for-word, match.

Mystic, if I didn't know you better, I'd swear you taught the sophomore "This is how we do experimental science and write lab reports about it" course with me at Pretentious SLAC, because we had an awful lot of this phenomenon in that course.

I have a plagiarism case pending now that hinges on this interpretation of plagiarism.  Unfortunately for the student, her claims of citing her sources and using her own words for the rest don't hold water because the sources she cite could not have been used to write the paper that is a rearranged Encyclopedia Britannica article with thesaurus use.

I only caught the plagiarism because the author left in a word that I have never before seen used in conjunction with this topic, despite reading at least one paper on this topic every term.  Googling that term immediately brought up references to the Encyclopedia Britannica article and only references to that article.  The word doesn't appear in any of the student's cited references nor does it appear in the thesaurus as a synonym for terms that would reasonably apply to scientist.

Busted!
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I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
infogoon
Senior member
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Posts: 663

Phlogiston Researcher.


« Reply #6211 on: April 19, 2012, 12:31:22 PM »

Well, lots of sympathies to any academics named George Zimmerman, Jerry Sandusky, or Bernard Madoff.  It could be much worse.

I once worked with a Jim Jones. I imagined him sitting on his living room floor as a teenager, watching the news and wondering "is it too late to start going by 'James' instead?"
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dr_alcott
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« Reply #6212 on: April 20, 2012, 6:07:54 PM »

Context: class discussion of a novel set in the early 1900s.

Me: What circumstances would have made it difficult for [protagonist], as a young, African-American girl, to travel during this time?

Student: Slavery?
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You must be your own snow, Dr_Alcott.  You must lift, and sparkle, and then melt away.

I love everyone here!
isotope
A Ronnie James Dio Approved
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I am a #$%&! delight.


« Reply #6213 on: April 20, 2012, 10:49:14 PM »

Okay, this wasn't really bad.  I just thought it was amusing.  It was the last day lecture for my specialty earthy kind of class. I've got one student who signed up for another of my introductory courses next year.  Another student was in there who already took it with me two years back.

Student 1:  I signed up for your class next semester! 

Me:  Alright.  That means you get more of my exams.

Student 1:  Dr. Isotope, I'm not gonna lie.  Your tests are freaking hard.  I mean, I study pretty hard for it and I'm barely getting to an A.

Me:  You think my tests are going to be easier in the other class?

Student 1:  It's a lower number course!  It has to be.

Me:  You might be surprised.  Student 2 had me years ago.

Student 1:  You did?  Oh man.  Were the tests hard.

Student 2:  No.  [She looks at me.  Her face turns red.  She looks down at the floor.]  Okay....yes.....

Student 1:  Craaaaaaaaaap!

Student 2:  It was good though!  It's what got me interested in geology in the first place.  That's why I'm here.

Student 1:  But I'm already here!  Dr. Isotope, you gotta have some mercy sometime.

Me:  College ain't easy.  Okay!  Lets get started! 
Logged

"I dunno, Dr. Isotope.  All your music sounds like something off of guitar hero, expert level." -- student
galactic_hedgehog
Procrastinating, Python-quoting, Blue Blazer-drinking, chocolate-chip cookie-eating, Pastafarian, Not So
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« Reply #6214 on: April 20, 2012, 10:53:04 PM »

Me:  You think my tests are going to be easier in the other class?

Student 1:  It's a lower number course!  It has to be.

Just imagine how much harder the tests would be if the course number went to 11.
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cc_alan
is a wossname
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Caution! Nekkid Zamboni driver ahead.


« Reply #6215 on: April 21, 2012, 12:03:13 AM »

Me:  You think my tests are going to be easier in the other class?

Student 1:  It's a lower number course!  It has to be.

Just imagine how much harder the tests would be if the course number went to 11.

<presses the "like" button>

Alan
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Guess what? I got a fever and the only prescription is MORE COWBELL!
polly_mer
practice makes perfect
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Posts: 37,443

Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #6216 on: April 21, 2012, 7:46:15 AM »

Me:  You think my tests are going to be easier in the other class?

Student 1:  It's a lower number course!  It has to be.

Just imagine how much harder the tests would be if the course number went to 11.

<presses the "like" button>

Alan

I am still amused that students get that reference nearly every time I say it.  There's hope, even if they refuse to believe that the Moon has gravity (the topic of some of my recent "favorite" conversations).
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I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
galactic_hedgehog
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« Reply #6217 on: April 22, 2012, 5:15:15 PM »

There's hope, even if they refuse to believe that the Moon has gravity (the topic of some of my recent "favorite" conversations).

Are they saying the astronauts wore heavy boots?
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polly_mer
practice makes perfect
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Posts: 37,443

Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #6218 on: April 22, 2012, 6:04:55 PM »

There's hope, even if they refuse to believe that the Moon has gravity (the topic of some of my recent "favorite" conversations).

Are they saying the astronauts wore heavy boots?

Oh, my!  I can see my students making that argument because I've heard similar ones.  I hadn't thought to use that example, but my students respond pretty well to prompts of "why do the astronauts wear helmets?" to end up with conclusions of no atmosphere.  Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure that the students conflated "the Moon is too small to hold an atmosphere" and "the Earth's gravity keeps our atmosphere in place" to conclude "the Moon has no gravity".  I'm pretty sure that all the people who argue the Moon has no gravity would make a heavy boots explanation because they have told me that things will fall down on the Moon, which has no gravity.
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I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
ptarmigan
grad student & chief dork dumpling
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« Reply #6219 on: April 22, 2012, 7:45:50 PM »

There's hope, even if they refuse to believe that the Moon has gravity (the topic of some of my recent "favorite" conversations).

Are they saying the astronauts wore heavy boots?

Oh, my!  I can see my students making that argument because I've heard similar ones.  I hadn't thought to use that example, but my students respond pretty well to prompts of "why do the astronauts wear helmets?" to end up with conclusions of no atmosphere.  Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure that the students conflated "the Moon is too small to hold an atmosphere" and "the Earth's gravity keeps our atmosphere in place" to conclude "the Moon has no gravity".  I'm pretty sure that all the people who argue the Moon has no gravity would make a heavy boots explanation because they have told me that things will fall down on the Moon, which has no gravity.

I guess the astronauts left those heavy boots behind, and that's what causes the tides, right?
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He's on my roster, but if I've taught him anything, it isn't math.
frogfactory
Totally Metal
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« Reply #6220 on: April 22, 2012, 7:51:58 PM »

There's hope, even if they refuse to believe that the Moon has gravity (the topic of some of my recent "favorite" conversations).

Are they saying the astronauts wore heavy boots?

Oh, my!  I can see my students making that argument because I've heard similar ones.  I hadn't thought to use that example, but my students respond pretty well to prompts of "why do the astronauts wear helmets?" to end up with conclusions of no atmosphere.  Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure that the students conflated "the Moon is too small to hold an atmosphere" and "the Earth's gravity keeps our atmosphere in place" to conclude "the Moon has no gravity".  I'm pretty sure that all the people who argue the Moon has no gravity would make a heavy boots explanation because they have told me that things will fall down on the Moon, which has no gravity.

I guess the astronauts left those heavy boots behind, and that's what causes the tides, right?

I am distinctly reminded of one of my favourite episodes of Dangermouse.
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At the end of the day, sometimes you just have to masturbate in the bathroom.
llanfair
Still reading past her bedtime and Very
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Whither Canada?


« Reply #6221 on: April 23, 2012, 12:12:32 PM »

There's hope, even if they refuse to believe that the Moon has gravity (the topic of some of my recent "favorite" conversations).

Are they saying the astronauts wore heavy boots?

Oh, my!  I can see my students making that argument because I've heard similar ones.  I hadn't thought to use that example, but my students respond pretty well to prompts of "why do the astronauts wear helmets?" to end up with conclusions of no atmosphere.  Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure that the students conflated "the Moon is too small to hold an atmosphere" and "the Earth's gravity keeps our atmosphere in place" to conclude "the Moon has no gravity".  I'm pretty sure that all the people who argue the Moon has no gravity would make a heavy boots explanation because they have told me that things will fall down on the Moon, which has no gravity.

And of course those heavy boots would help so much where there was no gravity.
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Stop looking for zebras when the horse is already standing on your foot.
galactic_hedgehog
Procrastinating, Python-quoting, Blue Blazer-drinking, chocolate-chip cookie-eating, Pastafarian, Not So
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Posts: 19,201

Mind Ninja


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« Reply #6222 on: April 23, 2012, 1:13:02 PM »

There's hope, even if they refuse to believe that the Moon has gravity (the topic of some of my recent "favorite" conversations).

Are they saying the astronauts wore heavy boots?

Oh, my!  I can see my students making that argument because I've heard similar ones.  I hadn't thought to use that example, but my students respond pretty well to prompts of "why do the astronauts wear helmets?" to end up with conclusions of no atmosphere.  Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure that the students conflated "the Moon is too small to hold an atmosphere" and "the Earth's gravity keeps our atmosphere in place" to conclude "the Moon has no gravity".  I'm pretty sure that all the people who argue the Moon has no gravity would make a heavy boots explanation because they have told me that things will fall down on the Moon, which has no gravity.

And of course those heavy boots would help so much where there was no gravity.

Sure.  Go ahead and bring facts into it.  That'll help.
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polly_mer
practice makes perfect
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 37,443

Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #6223 on: April 23, 2012, 4:19:40 PM »

There's hope, even if they refuse to believe that the Moon has gravity (the topic of some of my recent "favorite" conversations).

Are they saying the astronauts wore heavy boots?

Oh, my!  I can see my students making that argument because I've heard similar ones.  I hadn't thought to use that example, but my students respond pretty well to prompts of "why do the astronauts wear helmets?" to end up with conclusions of no atmosphere.  Unfortunately, I'm pretty sure that the students conflated "the Moon is too small to hold an atmosphere" and "the Earth's gravity keeps our atmosphere in place" to conclude "the Moon has no gravity".  I'm pretty sure that all the people who argue the Moon has no gravity would make a heavy boots explanation because they have told me that things will fall down on the Moon, which has no gravity.

And of course those heavy boots would help so much where there was no gravity.

Sure.  Go ahead and bring facts into it.  That'll help.

My students like to quote from our textbook where a slightly overzealous author explains that scientific facts are subject to change with further information.  Those students interpret that to mean that nothing in science is ever fixed and changes are made like crazy; their argument is then why they should learn any facts because those facts will be all different in a few years anyway.
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I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
jeffahall
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« Reply #6224 on: April 23, 2012, 5:01:47 PM »

There's hope, even if they refuse to believe that the Moon has gravity (the topic of some of my recent "favorite" conversations).

Are they saying the astronauts wore heavy boots?

No, you see the blue cheese gets sticky in a the vacuum of space, so the boots stick to it and keep the astronauts from floating away.
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