TESOL Methodology

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prytania3:
Fish or fowl?

I'm at a CC, and there has been a movement afoot to allow students to use a TESOL Methodology course as a humanities elective.

I say, no dice. I realize that some TESOL courses are in English departments, but not all English courses are humanities courses--like composition, for example. Some schools list TESOL as linguistics, and linguistics is sometimes in colleges' humanities departments and sometimes in their social sciences departments.

It seems like most TESOL programs at most reasonable universities or colleges have it in the education department, however.

My argument is TESOL is an education course, and education falls more broadly under social sciences.

In short, TESOL Methodology is not a humanities course.

What say the wise forumites?

daniel_von_flanagan:
It is certainly not a humanities course.

If a school decides to weaken a gened requirement, then it should do so in an explicit way, rather than through subterfuge. - DvF

prytania3:
Quote from: daniel_von_flanagan on March 03, 2013, 10:03:12 PM

It is certainly not a humanities course.

If a school decides to weaken a gened requirement, then it should do so in an explicit way, rather than through subterfuge. - DvF


There has been no subterfuge yet; and in fact, it was voted down. I'm just not sure we've seen the last of it.

new_bus_prof:
TESOL = Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages.

For me it would depend on whether the course included: comparing and contrasting how English is taught to native speakers and non-native speakers, English (US) vs. English (UK) vs. English (Australia), English as a primary language vs. secondary language, various global approaches to teaching English past and present, and understanding various language influences (Greek, Roman, Hebrew, Latin, etc.) to the English language.

If the course in question included those above, then I would probably give it a pass as a Humanities elective. It would be better than some humanities elective courses (i.e. Texting).

daniel_von_flanagan:
Quote from: new_bus_prof on March 03, 2013, 10:39:43 PM

For me it would depend on whether the course included: comparing and contrasting how English is taught to native speakers and non-native speakers, English (US) vs. English (UK) vs. English (Australia), English as a primary language vs. secondary language, various global approaches to teaching English past and present, and understanding various language influences (Greek, Roman, Hebrew, Latin, etc.) to the English language.

If the course in question included those above, then I would probably give it a pass as a Humanities elective.
No, all that would mean is that it is a college-level course.  I suppose that if the section involving the historical development of English was a nontrivial component of the course and also included cultural influences (and not just how this bit of Ole French became that bit of English) then it might qualify.

The reason to put humanities into a general education requirement is to expose students to the kind of reasoning used in the humanities.  Just because a course is a good course does not mean that it qualifies in a particular niche in the curriculum.  (We get this all the time, especially non-STEM courses being proposed for STEM requirements and the faculty doing the proposing getting offended at the rejection and taking it as an arrogant judgment on the quality of their course or field.) - DvF

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