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Author Topic: Why Parents Drink  (Read 878606 times)
gennimom
Somewhat Southern (Have I really posted that much?)
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Let's get summer over with! Me want snow!


« Reply #3000 on: March 08, 2012, 1:07:15 AM »

Well. This is interesting. We were outside on the patio and we have a cable we tie Munchkin (our dog) up so he can spend time outdoors. (We rent and can't put up a fence.) It didn't sneak up on Genni but she tripped over it as if she never saw it. I said something about it and she said something about not seeing well. I have no idea if she really can't or if she said that because she thought it was what I wanted to hear (I didn't!). Anyway, earlier today I made appointments for all of us on Friday. What bothers me is, if it is her eyes, last year an eye doc said her eyes were fine. She was climbing trees at Thanksgiving. Now she has trouble seeing? She has hit a growth spurt, so it may be that, but I'm worried if her eyes aren't so good that they are going bad too fast. Argh.

Bioteacher, I went over the checklist on that website and she does have a few of the characteristics, so I'll keep it in mind. Bookmarked!

She is a good student, academic-wise for a kindergartner! The teacher thinks she's great, even though sometimes Genni gets a little wild. Doesn't every kid? There are so many things to consider and keep an eye out for, just to make sure your child is growing up the best he/she can. And from everything I've heard/seen, it only gets more fun from here.

*sigh*
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...only after reading gm's post, my new mantra is "always listen to gennimom".
Monday reeks! - Garfield
The outside of a horse is good for the inside of a person (or something like that).
collegekidsmom
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Posts: 3,038


« Reply #3001 on: March 08, 2012, 2:01:12 AM »

I think it depends what you mean by "gets a little wild." Also, do all of these accidents happen at school?
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gennimom
Somewhat Southern (Have I really posted that much?)
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 18,467

Let's get summer over with! Me want snow!


« Reply #3002 on: March 08, 2012, 2:09:24 AM »

No. School, Boys and Girls Club, home,...

The one day she's gotten the lowest discipline mark the teacher gives, she was constantly getting into trouble. The teacher even described her as wild, and this teacher doesn't do that unless the student really behaved that way. When Genni was little, we even had to use a leash on her or she'd have run out in front of cars. She's gotten better, but there are times...

I'm waiting for the day I get the call that she's broken something. She does take after GD in that respect. He was very, shall we say, active? She (and he) is not hyperactive or ADD, though. I've got a nephew who is definitely that and she does not act like him at all. She can concentrate on school work and other things. It is just that when she gets going she can be hard to stop. Also, I've realized she's seemed like she doesn't pay attention to where she is going. If it is more that she can't see where she's going, then hopefully we can get that taken care of.

We'll see.
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...only after reading gm's post, my new mantra is "always listen to gennimom".
Monday reeks! - Garfield
The outside of a horse is good for the inside of a person (or something like that).
testingthewaters
Who? What?
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 3,603


« Reply #3003 on: March 08, 2012, 7:38:33 AM »

And then, some kids are just like that, gennimom. Not that I have one yet (38 weeks and counting....) but my youngest sister is 12 years younger than me, so I remeber her as a kid vividly. I also remember that we actually got to know the staff at the local ER since we were there so much. She just didn't pay attention to what she was doing, and didn't see danger. This also led to her totalling 3 (yes, 3) cars as a teenager, and putting innumerable dents in another, to the point where my parents took her license.

As a happy end, she's now 25, grew up to be a more than responsible adult, is a great teacher, does all kinds of volunteer work.... She's still a dreamer, but in a good way. And her driving has improved cosiderably.
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Time flies like an arrow;
fruit flies like a banana.
biomancer
trying to be the person my dog thinks I am
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Posts: 11,095

CHE Fora Hazmat Team


« Reply #3004 on: March 08, 2012, 10:22:53 AM »

Well. This is interesting. We were outside on the patio and we have a cable we tie Munchkin (our dog) up so he can spend time outdoors. (We rent and can't put up a fence.) It didn't sneak up on Genni but she tripped over it as if she never saw it. I said something about it and she said something about not seeing well. I have no idea if she really can't or if she said that because she thought it was what I wanted to hear (I didn't!). Anyway, earlier today I made appointments for all of us on Friday. What bothers me is, if it is her eyes, last year an eye doc said her eyes were fine. She was climbing trees at Thanksgiving. Now she has trouble seeing? She has hit a growth spurt, so it may be that, but I'm worried if her eyes aren't so good that they are going bad too fast. Argh.

...


Genni is 4, right?  If I recall correctly, the human skull and everything inside it continue to grow rapidly in size until slowing down about age 5, which means that her eyeballs and eye sockets are still growing pretty fast.   My friend who is an optometrist tells me that it's quite common for kids who seemed to have good vision at ages 2 and 3 to have vision problems at age 4 or 5 because that's when the eye sockets and eyeballs finish their growth (and may not do so in a way that allows perfect vision).  Once she's 5, her vision should stabilize for quite a while, and may even improve over time.
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Clueless people can be dangerous. The acidic environment they can spread often needs to be neutralized, and humor is basic.  - Dellaroux

I have realized that it is best to assume everyone is bonkers until they demonstrate otherwise. - ChaosByDesign
ms_turtle
"Pull up a turtle and sit down." -- Nick Charles, Shadow of the Thin Man
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Posts: 2,282


« Reply #3005 on: March 08, 2012, 11:10:20 AM »

Anyway, earlier today I made appointments for all of us on Friday. What bothers me is, if it is her eyes, last year an eye doc said her eyes were fine. She was climbing trees at Thanksgiving. Now she has trouble seeing? She has hit a growth spurt, so it may be that, but I'm worried if her eyes aren't so good that they are going bad too fast. Argh.

GM, my son's eyes went from fine to very myopic in a year's time (from 2nd - 3rd grade). Before the exam it helps to explain to them that they really need to listen carefully to the optometrist's questions and to speak the answers yes or no. The latter would be opposed to, oh..., nodding or shaking one's head in a dark room. Yes, this actually happened. :)
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'I get paid to think, and today I prefer to do my thinking lying down.' -- Inspector Morse

"Oh, PLANS, PLANS, PLANS -- how we make plans into the future, as if the future will most certainly be there!" -- John Irving
mystictechgal
Happy in my "full, rich adulthood", and as a
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Posts: 16,280

One step at a time


« Reply #3006 on: March 08, 2012, 5:40:21 PM »

Gennimom, that's about the same age that my nephew first got glasses. No one realized just how bad his eyesight really had gotten until they put his new glasses on him for the first time. They'd gone to an optometrist who had an office in the mall. When he put on the glasses his eyes got wide and he started looking all around, then he got all excited, started to grin, and said, "Wow! There's stuff out there!"

I had the same reaction after I had laser surgery to correct the extreme nearsightedness that I'd had all my life*. I entertained my husband all the way home by reading, aloud, every sign I saw. He thought it was hilarious.


*When I was a kid the prevailing belief was that giving a little kid glasses amounted to "giving up on their eyes". That somehow they should just "work harder" at seeing and vision would improve. The doctors finally relented when I was in third grade and had to walk all the way up to the board in order to read it, but I heard for ages how it was "my fault" because I read in low light and sat too close to the television set. (Well, yeah. It's the only way I could see it.)
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Quote
You must realize that a university cannot educate you. You must do that for yourself, although a college or university is the place where it is likely that you can study most efficiently.
http://www.lhup.edu/~dsimanek/chapman.htm

"Is all the same, only different" -- HL
amlithist
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Posts: 7,257


« Reply #3007 on: March 08, 2012, 6:04:03 PM »

*When I was a kid the prevailing belief was that giving a little kid glasses amounted to "giving up on their eyes". That somehow they should just "work harder" at seeing and vision would improve. The doctors finally relented when I was in third grade and had to walk all the way up to the board in order to read it, but I heard for ages how it was "my fault" because I read in low light and sat too close to the television set. (Well, yeah. It's the only way I could see it.)

Yep.  If I had a nickel for every, "you're going to ruin your eyes!" I got as a kid....And dad would walk past me doing my homework at the kitchen table, with my nose almost touching the book, and he'd automatically reach over and pull my head back.  Good times.  I got glasses, though; I think it was second grade.  I went through a prescription a year through college, though there was a period of a few years in about 6th-9th grades where I was having to get new glasses every 6-9 months.   All I remember is the Coke-bottle lenses (and how they were so heavy, the things always slid to the end of my nose), and feeling like I was in trouble because I had to get new glasses too often.
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collegekidsmom
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Posts: 3,038


« Reply #3008 on: March 08, 2012, 8:48:31 PM »

Strange - my child in third grade could not see the board, was moved to the front and she had always had good vision. Nobody in the family wears glasses so this came out of the blue. I could tell by watching that she couldn't see as well as before. I took her to a pediatric ophthalmologist and was told that this could be one of the things that occasionally happens around this age, and I was advised to bring her back in a few months and just let her sit in the front and use other accommodations as long as that worked OK for a short time. At the return visit, her vision was back to what it was before-and has been perfectly fine ever since. I had never heard of that before.
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gennimom
Somewhat Southern (Have I really posted that much?)
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 18,467

Let's get summer over with! Me want snow!


« Reply #3009 on: March 08, 2012, 10:56:49 PM »

Well. This is interesting. We were outside on the patio and we have a cable we tie Munchkin (our dog) up so he can spend time outdoors. (We rent and can't put up a fence.) It didn't sneak up on Genni but she tripped over it as if she never saw it. I said something about it and she said something about not seeing well. I have no idea if she really can't or if she said that because she thought it was what I wanted to hear (I didn't!). Anyway, earlier today I made appointments for all of us on Friday. What bothers me is, if it is her eyes, last year an eye doc said her eyes were fine. She was climbing trees at Thanksgiving. Now she has trouble seeing? She has hit a growth spurt, so it may be that, but I'm worried if her eyes aren't so good that they are going bad too fast. Argh.

...


Genni is 4, right?  If I recall correctly, the human skull and everything inside it continue to grow rapidly in size until slowing down about age 5, which means that her eyeballs and eye sockets are still growing pretty fast.   My friend who is an optometrist tells me that it's quite common for kids who seemed to have good vision at ages 2 and 3 to have vision problems at age 4 or 5 because that's when the eye sockets and eyeballs finish their growth (and may not do so in a way that allows perfect vision).  Once she's 5, her vision should stabilize for quite a while, and may even improve over time.

Actually, no, she's 6. We first had her eyes checked last spring, but knowing from the other posts I'm seeing here that her vision can change rapidly, I'm prepared to learn almost anything about her eyes tomorrow. We'll see, I guess!
Logged

...only after reading gm's post, my new mantra is "always listen to gennimom".
Monday reeks! - Garfield
The outside of a horse is good for the inside of a person (or something like that).
menotti
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,347


« Reply #3010 on: March 09, 2012, 5:20:03 AM »

Amahlet was sent home from day care Wed with general crud.  Since I planned to work from home yesterday, I kept him home but he was fine.  Woke up throwing up about an hour ago.  Sigh.  Today I do have some meetings, including a prospectus defense, I really ought to get to.  (The universe won't end if I'm not there, but I should be.)  Spouse also has some important work stuff going on.
Sigh.
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marigolds
looks far too young to be a
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i had fun once and it was awful


« Reply #3011 on: March 09, 2012, 9:45:44 AM »

Amahlet was sent home from day care Wed with general crud.  Since I planned to work from home yesterday, I kept him home but he was fine.  Woke up throwing up about an hour ago.  Sigh.  Today I do have some meetings, including a prospectus defense, I really ought to get to.  (The universe won't end if I'm not there, but I should be.)  Spouse also has some important work stuff going on.
Sigh.

If he doesn't have a fever, it could be puking from the postnasal drip of the crud. That's not catching! If he's OK for a while, has a normal appetite etc. and just seems snotty, he may be OK to go to daycare.
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They are our servants.  They are like dogs.  Sometimes, they think they remember being wolves, but they are only dreaming.
fishprof
After the spawning run is over...then what?
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Posts: 2,548


« Reply #3012 on: March 09, 2012, 11:17:29 AM »

Seeking advice, please.

As smolt (who is wonderful, BTW) is trying to learn when to sleep (at night, please, at night), I am growing increasingly frustrated bout how little else I get done around here (home, work, personal), and feeling like i am doing all the work.  Here's my problem, however;

1) I rationally KNOW that isn't the case,
2) I KNOW MrsFishProf is doing her share of the raising smolt (and then some, probably),
3) I still FEEL like it is all me and that is unfair. (and I am not one to be ruled by feelings, FWIW)

Am I experiencing a normal (i.e. typical) sleep-deprivation response, or does this sound like an incipient bigger issue?  I don't completely trust my own judgement these days.....
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Experience is what you get when you don't get what you want. - Randy Pausch, The Last Lecture
macaroon
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__/\__\0/__ Look out! Sharks!


« Reply #3013 on: March 09, 2012, 11:24:34 AM »

Stop doing all the work and pare down to essentials.  Get used to a messier house.  Get takeout more often, and consider hiring someone to clean.
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cgfunmathguy
Beer-brewing
Distinguished Senior Member
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Posts: 7,793


« Reply #3014 on: March 09, 2012, 12:02:35 PM »

Seeking advice, please.

As smolt (who is wonderful, BTW) is trying to learn when to sleep (at night, please, at night), I am growing increasingly frustrated bout how little else I get done around here (home, work, personal), and feeling like i am doing all the work.  Here's my problem, however;

1) I rationally KNOW that isn't the case,
2) I KNOW MrsFishProf is doing her share of the raising smolt (and then some, probably),
3) I still FEEL like it is all me and that is unfair. (and I am not one to be ruled by feelings, FWIW)

Am I experiencing a normal (i.e. typical) sleep-deprivation response, or does this sound like an incipient bigger issue?  I don't completely trust my own judgement these days.....
While I don't have kids of my own, I have undergone sleep deprivation on more than one occasion. It is normal to have your worldview collapse to yourself and at most a few other close people (e.g., MrsFishProf and Smolt). Thus, it feels like you're doing all the work everywhere (home, work, etc.). As you become more sleep-deprived, this worldview gets smaller until you're only focused on yourself and your interactions with Smolt. Just remember two things: MrsFishProf is going through the same feelings (especially if breastfeeding), and this will eventually pass.
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Alas, greatness and meaning are rarely coterminous with popular familiarity.
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