"Favorite" conversations with students

<< < (1465/1786) > >>

marigolds:
Quote from: balefulregardss on February 14, 2013, 10:36:37 PM

Quote from: dr_alcott on February 14, 2013,  4:17:12 PM

Quote from: prof_smartypants on February 14, 2013,  4:08:34 PM

Quote from: dr_alcott on February 14, 2013,  3:50:58 PM

Quote from: balefulregardss on February 14, 2013,  3:39:31 PM

Quote from: proftowanda on February 14, 2013,  3:35:18 PM

Quote from: prof_smartypants on February 14, 2013, 12:34:08 PM

The interaction at 1:22 is what I feel like doing when some of my students approach (yes, I am the buffalo/goat in this scenario)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PpccpglnNf0




To me, it was more reminiscent of . . . well, insert approval of minutes at the start and a motion to adjourn at the end, and it's a faculty meeting.


This is going to play dangerously in my brain tomorrow during the faculty meeting I will be attending.


Oh, good golly. That last one can't be real. Is the last one real?

I love these goats.


The screaming sheep is pretty much how I feel at faculty meetings.

Can one spit on a colleague that says something completely ridiculous? I say we start doing so, and then just yelling unintelligibly.


"Start"?


If we truly emulate the goats, we can also freely defecate while making those plaintive bleats.

I will also find a way to declare myself the "Lord of the Crabs" during the faculty meeting in the morning.


I don't know if that's such a good idea, coming hard on the heels of VD day and all.

blackadder:
Not a bad conversation but something that ultimately amused me and was somewhat pitiful.

The class had a simulation in our sim lab. At 5 minutes before the class is over, I'm called out by the director because "there is a young man here to see you". Huh...who in the world???

Turns out it was a missing student. He looked positively ill from worry and anxiety, apologized profusely for being late and missing the whole simulation. Alarm snooze issues apparently. I thought he was going to either throw up or cry. He also looked pretty skeptical when I tried to reassure him that one missed class will not sink his grade nor will I kill him. I took some convincing to get him to just let it go and move on with his day.

It's nice when they care about this sort of thing.

ptarmigan:
This isn't really a "favorite" conversation, but something I'm pondering.

I just sent an email to one of my students letting her know I appreciate the questions that she asks me in class. I think 90% of the questions asked in class come from her, and at any given moment, I'm mostly a little annoyed or flustered by it. We say "there are no dumb questions" but, if there were, these would be them. She's frequently confused by things that it would never have occurred to me could be confusing.

But all of her questions are completely on-topic, and I think she's really asking me questions that other students probably have but don't voice. It's kind of amazing the disconnect between what I think is clear or "makes sense" and how some of my students see things, and she's sort of keeping it real for me.

In fact, I think I'll pay her to sit in on my future classes and ask me all her dumb questions!

melba_frilkins:
One of my students invited me to a local concert "with a mosh pit and everything". I was quite flattered by the invitation.

cgfunmathguy:
Quote from: ptarmigan on February 18, 2013,  2:53:36 AM

This isn't really a "favorite" conversation, but something I'm pondering.

I just sent an email to one of my students letting her know I appreciate the questions that she asks me in class. I think 90% of the questions asked in class come from her, and at any given moment, I'm mostly a little annoyed or flustered by it. We say "there are no dumb questions" but, if there were, these would be them. She's frequently confused by things that it would never have occurred to me could be confusing.

But all of her questions are completely on-topic, and I think she's really asking me questions that other students probably have but don't voice. It's kind of amazing the disconnect between what I think is clear or "makes sense" and how some of my students see things, and she's sort of keeping it real for me.

In fact, I think I'll pay her to sit in on my future classes and ask me all her dumb questions!

I had a student like this when I was in grad school. She asked all the questions. One day, I was holding a review before the test coming up, and I got two--yes, two--questions. I mentioned that they needed to ask me any questions they had now. Finally, one guy who thought he was being funny said, "Question Girl isn't here today." It got a couple of snickers.

Me: Well, I'm assuming that no questions means that most or all of you haven't done the homework yet. Is that right?
<crickets>
Me: Would you folks care to guess who has the only A in the section right now?
<crickets, along with several wide-eyed stares from people who didn't think that As were possible in Remedial Basketweaving>
Me: You folks have to do the homework. It would help if you followed the pattern of (1) read the section to be covered before class, (2) come to class, take notes, and ask questions as soon as they occur, (3) do the homework, asking questions (via email) as they occur, (4) review the material before the review session for the test, and (5) attend the review session for the test so that you can ask your final questions before the test. If you all did that, I'd bet that you'd all be passing right now.

There were no more snide questions about Question Girl, and several joined her in a study group after that.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page