Accepting Older Grad. Student

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daniel_von_flanagan:
Quote from: summers_off on February 02, 2013,  5:43:03 PM

In the US, once the organization is a certain size (I think it is 12 employees) you can very well be sued--and the university too--if you do not hire someone because you "prefer" not to work with someone of a protected class. 
We're not necessarily talking about hiring someone here (though of course lab scientists also employ their advisees as research assistants).

Of course, in the US anyone can sue anyone else for any reason at all.  Do you know of any successful lawsuits concerning an advisor's choice of advisee? - DvF

baphd1996:
There are many instructors at my Uni who are going back for their doctorate, also many of my daughter's high school teachers are going back for doctorates.  They already have jobs, they are doing it for an increase in pay.

I am beginning to wonder if it is diluting the degree though.

literarylioness13:
Quote

Actually, "grandma" (that's what she insisted we call her) got along with me fine--at least on the front level.  It's when the students started to come to me to complain about how she's not penalizing late work and how she just hands people who complaint good grades that our relationship begin to sour.  I asked her not to ignore the syllabus policy or just hand students the grades they wanted and her response to me was, "The squeaky wheel gets the oil."  Definitely a generational thing here.  She said in her days as a student, the ones who complained gets their grades boosted up.  I was speechless to say the least.  I never thought this was a way to deal with student complaints.

I know of tenured profs who do stuff like this who are younger than me.This is not an age related issue, it's an ethical issue. Grandma just happens to be older. If you can document this, you have grounds to deal with her. She is not doing the students any favors, nor is she doing the discipline any good by inflating grades.

You are mixing up two different issues.

hiddendragon:
It's true that the fact that she did that may not be related to age, but the fact that she refused to do what I say when I told her to apply my syllabus rules did.  Her reply to me was that she was older and wiser than I, and "the squeeky wheel gets the oil."  She definitely saw my age as something she could walked all over.  Long story short:  she was never hired as a TA in my dept. again.

It's true that younger students can be a headache, too, because they can still challenge you, too. 

Others here bring out good points about time investment and other issues.

Quote from: literarylioness13 on February 04, 2013,  1:45:54 PM

I know of tenured profs who do stuff like this who are younger than me.This is not an age related issue, it's an ethical issue. Grandma just happens to be older. If you can document this, you have grounds to deal with her. She is not doing the students any favors, nor is she doing the discipline any good by inflating grades.

You are mixing up two different issues.

literarylioness13:
Quote

It's true that the fact that she did that may not be related to age, but the fact that she refused to do what I say when I told her to apply my syllabus rules did.  Her reply to me was that she was older and wiser than I, and "the squeeky wheel gets the oil."  She definitely saw my age as something she could walked all over.  Long story short:  she was never hired as a TA in my dept. again.

It's true that younger students can be a headache, too, because they can still challenge you, too. 


From what you are stating, this student is just not a good candidate for teaching. Grandma just used her age to manipulative you, but a younger student could use something else. I could get some guidance from a male advisor that I don't agree with and say to him: "I'm female and you just wouldn't understand." Should the male advisor think: "Geez, female grad students are just too big of a pain to deal with." Your scenario with Grandma is on the same. You got a manipulative grad student. That can happen with any age.

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