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Author Topic: 2011 Tenure Track Cohort  (Read 203536 times)
heywhynots
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« Reply #645 on: December 16, 2012, 8:46:12 PM »

At mine, you can't be on the T&P committee for the school but at the departmental level once you are in your third year, you participate as a full member making decisions on tenure & promotion.  It is crazy.  I do know of some schools that do have untenured members on the college T&P.  Even crazier.  Crazy happens.
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usukprof
Not sure he's been around long enough to really be a
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« Reply #646 on: December 17, 2012, 12:36:02 AM »

At mine, you can't be on the T&P committee for the school but at the departmental level once you are in your third year, you participate as a full member making decisions on tenure & promotion.  It is crazy.  I do know of some schools that do have untenured members on the college T&P.  Even crazier.  Crazy happens.

Our rule is simply that you can only evaluate people at a level below you.  Since I'm tenured, I now go to the department meeting to decide tenure and promotion to associate.  But until I go to full (hopefully next year) I can't be part of these decisions.  Makes sense to me.
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Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life, son.  --Dean Vernon Wormer
prof_smartypants
Treasure-pilferin' and grog-swillin'
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You're getting hosed by small minds with no game.


« Reply #647 on: December 17, 2012, 10:22:51 AM »

We have an untenured representative on our T&P. There's actually a proposal in place to eliminate that right now.

I think this is bad, because it's actually the junior faculty who review dossiers more rigorously, while the older guard (many of whom got tenure with zero research production) just promotes everyone. I understand the rationale of protecting junior faculty from retribution, etc., but there's so little rigor in how people are assessed, that I see this as a step backwards.

Regardless, the T&P meetings (not votes) are open to all faculty regardless of status, so everyone knows what the dossiers look like, and eventually everyone knows the outcomes. We haven't denied anyone at any level in decades.
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seniorscholar
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« Reply #648 on: December 17, 2012, 11:03:30 AM »

In my large department we have one untenured person -- usually in year 2 or 3 -- on the P&T committee, though at the college and university level it's only tenured folks for tenure cases  and only full profs for  promotion to full. (There is no department vote, only the committee and -- separately -- the department chair.) Generally when I've been on P&T, the junior person listens and asks questions but seldom expresses any strong opinion, and generally those people will say sometime after the vote is accomplished that it was really useful to know how cases are decided before putting together their own tenure materials. Since this system was already in the dept bylaws when I was hired, I have no idea how long it's been in place, but my suspicion is that it's been a very very long time, and I remember when I was untenured being grateful for the info about the materials and about the nature of discussion that was shared by not-yet-tenured colleagues. 
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usukprof
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« Reply #649 on: December 17, 2012, 10:40:08 PM »

In my large department we have one untenured person -- usually in year 2 or 3 -- on the P&T committee, though at the college and university level it's only tenured folks for tenure cases  and only full profs for  promotion to full. (There is no department vote, only the committee and -- separately -- the department chair.) Generally when I've been on P&T, the junior person listens and asks questions but seldom expresses any strong opinion, and generally those people will say sometime after the vote is accomplished that it was really useful to know how cases are decided before putting together their own tenure materials. Since this system was already in the dept bylaws when I was hired, I have no idea how long it's been in place, but my suspicion is that it's been a very very long time, and I remember when I was untenured being grateful for the info about the materials and about the nature of discussion that was shared by not-yet-tenured colleagues. 

Ah, that does seem a reasonable reason that I hadn't thought of.  In our case, I will try to give my mentee an idea of what goes down.  I think it is an interesting idea to make the process more transparent.
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Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life, son.  --Dean Vernon Wormer
nekolove
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« Reply #650 on: December 20, 2012, 3:34:31 PM »

Just checking in.

I have found year two harder than year one. Part of this is because I actually got my research agenda moving forward again over the summer, and have been working my butt off on research things over the semester as well.

It paid off, I have a book chapter being published in an edited edition this summer, spoke at two conferences in the summer and this fall, and have been accepted to speak at an important conference this upcoming summer. I have also been accepted into a curated show (I'm in art and design) and asked to give a workshop in the fall.

My classes are also going well. The students are engaged and seem to enjoy the courses and me. They are also doing good work for the most part.

However, it's hard to keep my head above water. My service obligations have stacked up on me (still trying to learn how to say no) and I have been doing some time consuming freelance work (which is good money that I've already been paid, so I need to stick it out at least through February). I have good time management skills from the years I worked in my discipline/industry, but sometimes there are just TOO many things to do in the day/week.

I know I could probably ramp everything down if I wanted, and still get tenure and be doing a good job here at my teaching focused state school. I don't have plans to leave, but I want to be able to do so down the road if I choose, and I want to have a great research and teaching record to back me up.

I have streaks of excellent productivity, and then streaks of feeling so overwhelmed that I get only the bare minimum done. I know I need to implement something to make my days more disciplined, but right now I feel so lazy/crabby. It will pass. I have deadlines to hit very soon, and haven't even started prepping my classes for next semester (one is a brand new prep and the other is a revamp).

Glad to hear so many are doing so well. And for those on the market, good luck. Hopefully everything will work out to your satisfaction, and remember, you have to do what is right for you and your family. You can't allow colleague opinions to keep you from going where you need to go.
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laurel_knx
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« Reply #651 on: December 27, 2012, 12:07:32 PM »

I know I could probably ramp everything down if I wanted, and still get tenure and be doing a good job here at my teaching focused state school. I don't have plans to leave, but I want to be able to do so down the road if I choose, and I want to have a great research and teaching record to back me up.

I have streaks of excellent productivity, and then streaks of feeling so overwhelmed that I get only the bare minimum done. I know I need to implement something to make my days more disciplined, but right now I feel so lazy/crabby. It will pass. I have deadlines to hit very soon, and haven't even started prepping my classes for next semester (one is a brand new prep and the other is a revamp).

I have the same vacillations between getting things done and being overwhelmed (and feeling that I can't "ramp down" even though I'm on-track for tenure). I think it's ok to feel lazy over the break. We've earned it! I've given over more of my vacation to actually relaxing than getting things done than I initially planned because I just can't face spring semester without a break.

Two things that really helped when I felt overwhelmed last semester: (1) I drew a line in the sand for no more commitments until a certain few projects were completed (or until March, whichever comes last) and (2) I made sure I really used my to-do lists (trying to keep everything happening on time is a nightmare when I get sloppy with my lists). There are lots of good projects out there, the important thing is to identify how many and which ones you can do justice to. Beyond that, we just have to say no! (Easier said than done...)
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ann05
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Posts: 548


« Reply #652 on: January 15, 2013, 8:40:54 PM »

Everything Neko said is true for me as well. I arrive at school at 8 AM some days and leave at 10 PM and given everything, it is really hard to get any scholarship done. Luckily I worked out a sweet deal and acquired a research assistant for the semester. I am hopeful this ups my productivity. I really love my research and really want to get it out to the larger world. I'm just struggling to find time.

Anyway, Neko owes me coffee. I shall collect on one of these crazy days where caffeine is going to be what gets me through. :) 
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sprout
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Posts: 366


« Reply #653 on: March 28, 2013, 6:52:33 PM »

Does anyone else feel like being on the tenure track is slowly killing your joy in teaching?
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lottie
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Posts: 289


« Reply #654 on: March 28, 2013, 8:09:18 PM »

Does anyone else feel like being on the tenure track is slowly killing your joy in teaching?
I feel like hostile students are killing my joy in teaching. They are definitely a minority, but they are so damn needy and vocal. They undermine my confidence and make me secondguess everything.
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sprout
Senior member
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Posts: 366


« Reply #655 on: March 28, 2013, 8:49:20 PM »

Does anyone else feel like being on the tenure track is slowly killing your joy in teaching?
I feel like hostile students are killing my joy in teaching. They are definitely a minority, but they are so damn needy and vocal. They undermine my confidence and make me secondguess everything.

Aah, there's that too.

What's getting me at the moment is the constant drumbeat of improve your student eval scores.
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yellowtractor
Vice-Provost of the University of the South-East Corner of Donkeyshire (formerly Donkeyshire Polytechnic) (a Post-1992 University) and also a
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« Reply #656 on: March 28, 2013, 8:50:24 PM »

Wait, someone had a "joy in teaching"??




(ponders)
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It is, of course, possible that what I remember as terror was only a love too great to bear.
sprout
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« Reply #657 on: March 28, 2013, 9:52:46 PM »

It's not like I'm in it for the money!
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gotmilk1
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Posts: 7


« Reply #658 on: March 29, 2013, 12:23:19 AM »

You get home before 10? Year 2 is harder - perhaps because I am pulled in so many directions, and attempts for funding seem endless. But I feel more confident and comfortable in my skin and I do sleep more - if that is any measure of happiness and balance.
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prof_smartypants
Treasure-pilferin' and grog-swillin'
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You're getting hosed by small minds with no game.


« Reply #659 on: March 29, 2013, 10:25:40 AM »

Hi All,

I'm actually in year 4, but year 2 of the TT. (3/3 load)

It gets way easier. I am only in the office 25 or so hours per week. I do most of my research at home. I only work on fun things on weekends (unless I have grading to do, but I have figured out how to knock that out). I found a local massage place that does 60 minute massages for like $45. I bought a dozen and get one a month.

How do I do this? I have stopped trying to be perfect. If I feel like crap, I cancel my class. I intersperse films into my classes. I re-use exams semester after semester (since they are short answer, it's not a problem). I use the same lectures semester after semester.

I have decided that I don't WANT to be the world's most perfect instructor. I want to have a life.

That said, my teaching evals are still great. No one seemed to notice I stopped trying. I've published 3 articles, a book chapter, and an edited book since 2010, and I have 3 articles currently under review. I'm working on a huge grant that will give me a course release and summer salary for the next five years. I'm excited about my research. I enjoy my teaching (for the most part). Life is pretty good.
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