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Author Topic: So what have you read lately  (Read 964313 times)
llanfair
Still reading past her bedtime and Very
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« Reply #3825 on: December 16, 2012, 12:45:39 PM »

(from James Polster's The Graduate Student:

Quote
When anthropology graduate student Blackwell James returns from a research expedition in the Amazon, he brings home a trunk full of rare hallucinogenic vines…but no research notes. Frustrated by the young man’s lack of progress on his dissertation, Blackwell’s professor finds him a job working on a primate experiment in Los Angeles to spur him along. Trouble is, Blackwell has never set foot in L.A., and he doesn’t know a whit about primates. In fact, for a guy like Blackwell James, venturing into the City of Angels soon proves to be more dangerous than the Amazon ever was. From the moment he is thrust into the bizarre culture of Hollywood, his life becomes a wild, high-octane tale of adventure, suspense, and intrigue. Caught up in the secret ambitions of his new employers, Blackwell begins a strange trip through the surreal world of movie stars, murder, and money. A secret society, a ghost town, two large chimpanzees, and several shamanistic drug-induced journeys round out this outrageous novel, which features “cameos” by Sylvester Stallone, Johnny Depp, and Steven Spielberg. Gleefully continuing the great literary tradition of comic Hollywood novels, The Graduate Student is an exuberant and riveting ride.

Graduate students live wild, high-octane lives! I clearly went to the wrong school.

VP

Link saved for next time someone asks me whether or not they should do a PhD!

You might also send them this, to balance things out.
« Last Edit: December 16, 2012, 12:46:12 PM by llanfair » Logged

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mickeymantle
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« Reply #3826 on: December 16, 2012, 10:07:58 PM »


Finished Heike.  Not easy to understand, but it seems to have a definite rhythm of resignation and action, as I said before. 

Am now starting the 1981 TV version of Evelyn Waugh's Brideshead Revisited.  I remember seeing it in bits and pieces when it originally aired in the early 1980s.  I like the novel, and seeing the first season of Downton Abbey whetted my appetite. 
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arizona
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« Reply #3827 on: December 17, 2012, 11:02:47 AM »

Just started Russell Banks's Lost Memory of Skin. I've never read any of his books, although I heard him speak once and found him to be incredibly sharp and engaging.
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bibliothecula
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like Bunnicula, only with books


« Reply #3828 on: December 17, 2012, 2:05:38 PM »

A Hologram for the King was bleah. I just can't get into books with self-destructive protagonists, I guess. Now onto some fun YA short stories about witches in Under My Hat.
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dr_alcott
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« Reply #3829 on: December 17, 2012, 2:31:54 PM »

A Hologram for the King was bleah. I just can't get into books with self-destructive protagonists, I guess. Now onto some fun YA short stories about witches in Under My Hat.

Good to know. I almost picked up Hologram a couple times.

Yesterday, I finished Nicholson Baker's House of Holes. Its subtitle is A Book of Raunch. I'll say it is. It was also sometimes hilarious, often weird, occasionally disgusting, and very occasionally steamy. It was entertaining, but not at all my favorite Baker.

And I've started Carol Anshaw's Carry the One. If I didn't have to clean my house, start my Christmas shopping, or do anything parenting-related, I'd stay in bed all day to read this book. So far, I love it.
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oldsirfaulk
There once was a lim’ricking
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« Reply #3830 on: December 17, 2012, 6:46:32 PM »

(from James Polster's The Graduate Student:

Quote
When anthropology graduate student Blackwell James returns from a research expedition in the Amazon, he brings home a trunk full of rare hallucinogenic vines…but no research notes. Frustrated by the young man’s lack of progress on his dissertation, Blackwell’s professor finds him a job working on a primate experiment in Los Angeles to spur him along. Trouble is, Blackwell has never set foot in L.A., and he doesn’t know a whit about primates. In fact, for a guy like Blackwell James, venturing into the City of Angels soon proves to be more dangerous than the Amazon ever was. From the moment he is thrust into the bizarre culture of Hollywood, his life becomes a wild, high-octane tale of adventure, suspense, and intrigue. Caught up in the secret ambitions of his new employers, Blackwell begins a strange trip through the surreal world of movie stars, murder, and money. A secret society, a ghost town, two large chimpanzees, and several shamanistic drug-induced journeys round out this outrageous novel, which features “cameos” by Sylvester Stallone, Johnny Depp, and Steven Spielberg. Gleefully continuing the great literary tradition of comic Hollywood novels, The Graduate Student is an exuberant and riveting ride.

Graduate students live wild, high-octane lives! I clearly went to the wrong school.

VP

Link saved for next time someone asks me whether or not they should do a PhD!

You might also send them this, to balance things out.

Oh, they'll find their way to PHD in the end. We all find our way to PHD in the end.

Ahem. </sidetrack>
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melba_frilkins
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« Reply #3831 on: December 17, 2012, 8:58:38 PM »

Slammerkin by Emma Donoghue. Just finished it. Not sure if I liked it or loved it.
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tinyzombie
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« Reply #3832 on: December 17, 2012, 9:07:35 PM »

Slammerkin by Emma Donoghue. Just finished it. Not sure if I liked it or loved it.

I loved Room - so much that I have been staying away from her other work. That is, until recently, when I ran across Landing under the mistaken impression that one of the Nanny Diaries authors had written it. (Your post and Google are what learned me.) So far, it is much more forgettable than Room.

I also learned that she is the daughter of Denis Donoghue.
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arizona
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« Reply #3833 on: December 17, 2012, 9:14:24 PM »

Slammerkin by Emma Donoghue. Just finished it. Not sure if I liked it or loved it.

I loved Room - so much that I have been staying away from her other work. That is, until recently, when I ran across Landing under the mistaken impression that one of the Nanny Diaries authors had written it. (Your post and Google are what learned me.) So far, it is much more forgettable than Room.

I also learned that she is the daughter of Denis Donoghue.

Landing is not one of her best, I think. I enjoyed Stir Fry, her first novel, although I read it in college so I don't know how it would hold up for a more grown-up reader. And I enjoyed Slammerkin and Kissing the Witch, which is a collection of re-imagined fairytales. Room is very, very unlike her other work.

I had no idea she was Denis Donoghue's daughter.
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prof_smartypants
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You're getting hosed by small minds with no game.


« Reply #3834 on: December 17, 2012, 10:51:41 PM »

Whatever y'all do, do not read The Sealed Letter. Couldn't get through it. I loved Slammerkin.

I am now reading The AlienIst. It is apparently required reading for urban history buffs. So far so good. Never read any Carr before. Anyone else?
« Last Edit: December 17, 2012, 10:53:15 PM by prof_smartypants » Logged

voxprincipalis
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« Reply #3835 on: December 17, 2012, 10:58:16 PM »

I am now reading The AlienIst. It is apparently required reading for urban history buffs. So far so good. Never read any Carr before. Anyone else?

I read that a couple of months ago. I thought it was ... OK. There was something that prevented me from fully buying into it, but I can't remember what it was. I don't regret the time spent reading it, but I don't think I'm going to read the sequel.

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bibliothecula
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like Bunnicula, only with books


« Reply #3836 on: December 18, 2012, 6:12:27 PM »

Whatever y'all do, do not read The Sealed Letter. Couldn't get through it. I loved Slammerkin.

I am now reading The AlienIst. It is apparently required reading for urban history buffs. So far so good. Never read any Carr before. Anyone else?

The first time I read The AlienIst I was about 15 and mostly liked it. When I tried it again a few years ago, it didn't do much for me and I didn't finish it.

Re: Emma Donoghue, I agree that The Sealed Letter wasn't very good; I didn't much like Life Mask either. But I love Kissing the Witch, The Woman Who Gave Birth to Rabbits, Slammerkin, and Room. Landing was just too pat, or something. I never cared much about the characters one way or the other.
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tinyzombie
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elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #3837 on: December 18, 2012, 6:24:02 PM »

Whatever y'all do, do not read The Sealed Letter. Couldn't get through it. I loved Slammerkin.

I am now reading The AlienIst. It is apparently required reading for urban history buffs. So far so good. Never read any Carr before. Anyone else?

The first time I read The AlienIst I was about 15 and mostly liked it. When I tried it again a few years ago, it didn't do much for me and I didn't finish it.

Re: Emma Donoghue, I agree that The Sealed Letter wasn't very good; I didn't much like Life Mask either. But I love Kissing the Witch, The Woman Who Gave Birth to Rabbits, Slammerkin, and Room. Landing was just too pat, or something. I never cared much about the characters one way or the other.

I am slogging through Landing. Time to stop reading it.
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I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
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Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
llanfair
Still reading past her bedtime and Very
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Posts: 31,349

Whither Canada?


« Reply #3838 on: December 18, 2012, 7:39:31 PM »

Whatever y'all do, do not read The Sealed Letter. Couldn't get through it. I loved Slammerkin.

I am now reading The AlienIst. It is apparently required reading for urban history buffs. So far so good. Never read any Carr before. Anyone else?

The first time I read The AlienIst I was about 15 and mostly liked it. When I tried it again a few years ago, it didn't do much for me and I didn't finish it.

Re: Emma Donoghue, I agree that The Sealed Letter wasn't very good; I didn't much like Life Mask either. But I love Kissing the Witch, The Woman Who Gave Birth to Rabbits, Slammerkin, and Room. Landing was just too pat, or something. I never cared much about the characters one way or the other.

I am slogging through Landing. Time to stop reading it.

I must be weird - or an eighteenth-century specialist.  I loved Slammerkin and Life Mask and The Woman ... RabbitsThe Sealed Letter I enjoyed, too - and Room was marvellous (if dark).  Haven't seen Kissing the Witch - must get that.
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polly_mer
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Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #3839 on: December 18, 2012, 8:18:23 PM »

In the past ten minutes, I've finished Until the End by Nicci French.

The basic premise is pretty typical mystery novel: ordinary person suddenly starts finding dead bodies and police are suspicious that the ordinary person is the killer.  The nifty part is that the first half of the book is following around the ordinary person until the killer is caught while the second half of the book revisits the same events, but this time we follow around the killer.
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