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Author Topic: Academia and Evangelicals  (Read 11886 times)
quasihumanist
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« Reply #15 on: December 16, 2012, 10:56:43 PM »

There are also plenty of colleges and universities where secularists can get an education, through to a PhD, without having to hear any ideas that challenge their core beliefs, as well.

Comparing the silly notions of a sheltered 18yo to those of an educated PhD is not becoming of educated people.  And evangelicals built the foundations of American higher ed.

No.  Mainline Protestant denominations (Lutherans, Presbyterians, Methodists, Episcopalians, etc) built the foundations of American higher ed (or at least a good bit of it).  Evangelicals are like a parasite that attached itself to mainline Protestantism and all but killed it.  The new evangelicals neither understand nor respect the values and traditions of the "liberal" Protestantism they have supplanted.

I think evangelicals see themselves as the true descendents of the First and Second Great Awakening Protestants that founded a lot of these colleges.

Given that no one has heard of Jonathan Edwards nowadays, much less read any of his sermons, they probably have as good a claim as any.
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yellowtractor
Vice-Provost of the University of the South-East Corner of Donkeyshire (formerly Donkeyshire Polytechnic) (a Post-1992 University) and also a
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« Reply #16 on: December 16, 2012, 10:59:07 PM »

Given that no one has heard of Jonathan Edwards nowadays, much less read any of his sermons

Au contraire.
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bcohlan1
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« Reply #17 on: December 16, 2012, 11:03:20 PM »

I think evangelicals see themselves as the true descendents of the First and Second Great Awakening Protestants that founded a lot of these colleges.

Given that no one has heard of Jonathan Edwards nowadays, much less read any of his sermons, they probably have as good a claim as any.

Huh. None of the evangelicals I ever knew had enough of a sense of history to know what the Great Awakening was. They saw themselves (and I saw myself, then) instead as the true descendants of the first century church.
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mended_drum
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« Reply #18 on: December 16, 2012, 11:04:00 PM »

Given that no one has heard of Jonathan Edwards nowadays, much less read any of his sermons

Au contraire.

"Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" was required reading in my American lit class in high school.  A public high school.
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corny
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« Reply #19 on: December 16, 2012, 11:07:18 PM »

Given that no one has heard of Jonathan Edwards nowadays, much less read any of his sermons

Au contraire.

"Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" was required reading in my American lit class in high school.  A public high school.

Mine too - and then we all had to write our own speeches in the same style. There were a lot of "Students in the Hands of an Angry English Teacher" speeches, as I recall.
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prytania3
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« Reply #20 on: December 16, 2012, 11:38:44 PM »

I do a great Jonathan Edwards. My students are always ready to repent.
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parispundit
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« Reply #21 on: December 17, 2012, 2:18:25 AM »

I find it interesting that the people who wrote up the survey separated out one group of Christians from the rest; yet all Jews and all Muslims are lumped together in their respective groups.

Do you really thnk many Americans, even many academics, distinguish between Sunnis and Shiites in their feelings about Muslims? Or even about Hasidim and Reform among Jews?
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melba_frilkins
Doing laundry.
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« Reply #22 on: December 17, 2012, 2:23:57 AM »

I find it interesting that the people who wrote up the survey separated out one group of Christians from the rest; yet all Jews and all Muslims are lumped together in their respective groups.

Do you really thnk many Americans, even many academics, distinguish between Sunnis and Shiites in their feelings about Muslims? Or even about Hasidim and Reform among Jews?

No. But I imagine wildly different survey results if they had surveyed on "Christians" as a whole group, rather than parceling out the evangelicals.
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spork
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« Reply #23 on: December 17, 2012, 6:46:14 AM »

I see a lot more sexism in academia than discrimination/prejudice based on religious affiliation.
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burocrata
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« Reply #24 on: December 17, 2012, 10:25:45 AM »

There are also plenty of colleges and universities where secularists can get an education, through to a PhD, without having to hear any ideas that challenge their core beliefs, as well.

I was about to post the exact same thing.  Is your typical late teenage middle class liberal student going to have his/her beliefs challenged at a typical university? 

As an aside, I just finished my undergrad at a university that's affiliated with an evangelical denomination.  I'm an atheist so I was a bit skeptical at first, particularly as there was a requirement to take a 3sh Bible class, but it was what I had available to me. 

The Bible class(on the OT) turned out to be some of the best fun I've had in a long and winding college career.  Essentially, the whole point was to challenge the students' preconceived notions of the Bible.  There was definitely some gnashing of teeth and rending of garments, but the prof wasn't having any of it.  It was a ton of work, but at the end of it I was wishing I could take their NT course as well. 
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navydad
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« Reply #25 on: December 17, 2012, 11:41:52 AM »

"I find it interesting that the people who wrote up the survey separated out one group of Christians from the rest; yet all Jews and all Muslims are lumped together in their respective groups."

It's not only interesting, it makes the numbers worthless. Let's guess what the results would have been if the following terms had been used:

"extreme fundamentalist Jews"  "radical Islamic Muslims"  "Christians"

GIGO
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prof_smartypants
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You're getting hosed by small minds with no game.


« Reply #26 on: December 17, 2012, 11:50:26 AM »

Given that no one has heard of Jonathan Edwards nowadays, much less read any of his sermons

Au contraire.

"Sinners in the Hands of an Angry God" was required reading in my American lit class in high school.  A public high school.

Mine too - and then we all had to write our own speeches in the same style. There were a lot of "Students in the Hands of an Angry English Teacher" speeches, as I recall.

Mine 3. I can't remember if it was lit or history, though.
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flyingbison
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« Reply #27 on: December 17, 2012, 11:56:45 AM »

Like it or not, anyone here seriously think that evangelicals are not discriminated against in some circles in American academia?  Really?

I think that some evangelicals are discriminated against in American academia. I also think that some evangelicals discriminate against other religions (especially Catholics who they don't think are Christian) and groups (especially homosexuals).

I think evangelicals are also prone to feeling that they are the object of persecution/discrimination, when their beliefs are challenged or disputed.
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Resist much, obey little.
pgher
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« Reply #28 on: December 17, 2012, 12:08:57 PM »

I find it interesting that the people who wrote up the survey separated out one group of Christians from the rest; yet all Jews and all Muslims are lumped together in their respective groups.

Do you really thnk many Americans, even many academics, distinguish between Sunnis and Shiites in their feelings about Muslims? Or even about Hasidim and Reform among Jews?

No. But I imagine wildly different survey results if they had surveyed on "Christians" as a whole group, rather than parceling out the evangelicals.

Out of curiosity, I skimmed the actual report.  There are categories for Catholics, non-Evangelical Christians, Evangelical Christians, and various other religions.  Non-evangelicals received a 9% "unfavorable."
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burocrata
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« Reply #29 on: December 17, 2012, 12:10:03 PM »

I think evangelicals are also prone to feeling that they are the object of persecution/discrimination, when their beliefs are challenged or disputed.

There is a lot of truth to that, which I think stems from the emphasis on the persecution of the early church.  For some folks, it is always the 2nd century CE in Rome, in there with the lions.  

But the thing that struck me about the results is that they show the spectrum of acceptable prejudice, and to have people justifying it just confirms that.  We're all human as noted previously, but could people at least not be proud of these biases?
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