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Author Topic: When to include new affiliation in author bio  (Read 4192 times)
erroneously
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« on: April 12, 2012, 9:28:47 PM »

I've seen threads that discussed when to start putting your new TT affiliation on your CV, but I'm wondering when it's appropriate to start listing it in your author bio for publications.  I have a signed contract for a TT job in the fall and no current affiliation (not even adjuncting) so I'd like to say something like "Old Chestnut will begin her appointment as assistant professor of BLANK studies at BLANK University in Fall 2012," but in browsing through the author bios that I happen to have lying around my house I can't find any examples of people listing their future positions.  Is it done?
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koda_kube
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« Reply #1 on: April 12, 2012, 11:15:07 PM »

I would say to list the institution at which the research was conducted.  Once in your new office then list your new institution even if you did the research elsewhere.  I am assuming you mean your address for submitted manuscripts?  Given the long period for review and then revision and resubmit you'd likely be at your new address by the time it is published (in that case just list your new institution!

Congrats on the new position!
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Asst. Prof. Biogeochemistry
erroneously
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« Reply #2 on: April 12, 2012, 11:33:03 PM »

No, I actually mean it's an article that will be published next month in a journal that includes 2-3 sentence author bios for its contributors.  The research was conducted while I was in grad school, but since I graduated a couple of years ago it feels weird to go back to listing that institution (which didn't give me any research funding for this project anyway!)
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youllneverwalkalone
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« Reply #3 on: April 13, 2012, 5:47:25 AM »

Why not just mention both places?

E.g. you could write something like: "Author X conducted this research during his PhD at whatever university. Author X is currently holding a Y position at University Z."
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seniorscholar
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« Reply #4 on: April 13, 2012, 10:18:07 AM »

Why not just mention both places?

E.g. you could write something like: "Author X conducted this research during his PhD at whatever university. Author X is currently holding a Y position at University Z."

Exactly. The affiliation in the author bio is there to (1) acknowledge the university at which the work was done and (2) provide a way for readers to get in touch with you if they want to get further information, invite you to participate on a panel they're putting together, ask if you want to contribute to the special issue they're putting together, etc. etc. etc. Thus both belong in the journal as soon as you know where you'll be next year, since people may be reading that article for the first time for several months or even years.
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erroneously
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« Reply #5 on: April 13, 2012, 11:38:02 AM »

Sorry to keep harping on the details of this, but since I'm currently NOT holding a position at University Z (and won't be for a couple of months yet), can I say that I WILL be holding a position at University Z in the fall?  That's the part I'm not sure about.
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youllneverwalkalone
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« Reply #6 on: April 13, 2012, 12:25:23 PM »

Hmmm, you are 100% sure that you'll get the new position, RIGHT? Like you have it black on white already?

If yes, then I would just mention the new affiliation regardless. A couple of months is not at all a significanttime lapse. 

If you are the hair-splitter type you could go for a more ambigous formulation such as "...and has been recently appointed XYZ" so technically you are not saying you hold that position already.
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seniorscholar
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« Reply #7 on: April 13, 2012, 3:02:28 PM »

Sorry to keep harping on the details of this, but since I'm currently NOT holding a position at University Z (and won't be for a couple of months yet), can I say that I WILL be holding a position at University Z in the fall?  That's the part I'm not sure about.

Yes, of course. (Actually, I thought that was what I'd written, but a ringing phone will do things like that.)
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litdawg
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« Reply #8 on: April 13, 2012, 9:40:10 PM »

If you're writing your author bio now, the piece won't be published for a few weeks/months at the earliest, right? Just how much of a gap between publication and starting your new position do you expect? It is likely that listing your new affiliation will be accurate by the time that readers digest your new publication, so go for it.
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erroneously
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« Reply #9 on: April 13, 2012, 11:06:19 PM »

My article will be published in May and I don't officially start the job until the fall semester starts in August.  The contract is signed and I've already ordered my fall books and my office # has been assigned so it's definitely a done deal, but I'm not an asst. professor quite yet!  Does it make any sense to email my new chair and ask if it would be okay for me to list the new institution in the bio?
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seniorscholar
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« Reply #10 on: April 14, 2012, 9:45:07 AM »

Does it make any sense to email my new chair and ask if it would be okay for me to list the new institution in the bio?

Frankly, I think that would create the impression that you're going to be a high-maintenance faculty member, which is not a good way to start out. This kind of listing "Present University, will be at New University from August 2012" is frequent and conventional. And a department/university likes to have its name in print with a good publication: it's nice publicity for them.
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msparticularity
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« Reply #11 on: April 14, 2012, 1:38:31 PM »

Does it make any sense to email my new chair and ask if it would be okay for me to list the new institution in the bio?

Frankly, I think that would create the impression that you're going to be a high-maintenance faculty member, which is not a good way to start out. This kind of listing "Present University, will be at New University from August 2012" is frequent and conventional. And a department/university likes to have its name in print with a good publication: it's nice publicity for them.

I agree. I would suggest that instead you check with the managing editor at the journal to confirm that they will allow you to go ahead and list your new affiliation.
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