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Author Topic: Buying eye glasses online  (Read 18393 times)
luce373
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« Reply #30 on: April 25, 2015, 1:33:56 pm »

The Warby Parker guys are pretty interesting (they've also started a razor company, Harry's), but their frames never appealed to me.  (Reviews of the Harry's razors fall into two categories: among the best, and sliced my neck open.)

There is a lot of variation in the online places.  Partly inspired by this thread I just bought two pairs last month from Eye Buy Direct (2 pairs for $50 including shipping), they are as good as any glasses I've ever owned except possibly one Flexon pair for which I paid around $400 in 1996 dollars.

venerable_bede, did you try to get Warby Parker to give you a new pair?  I wouldn't buy online from someone who didn't have a generous return policy.   - DvF

You know, I didn't, but only because I've been lazy about it. I've been imagining a conversation with them that's like "The glasses are weird." And they say "Well, we filled the prescription you sent us." And then I say "Uhhhh..." But it looks like they actually have quite a good returns/exchanges policy, so I should be more optimistic, I guess.

I tried to get sunglasses from Warby Parker last summer. I live somewhere they have a store, so I got them in person. The sunglasses still sucked and I had to return them after several attempts at adjustment. "Weird" is basically the best way to describe it...everything just looked off. Maybe a little like a fishbowl? It made me dizzy. The return policy was nice, but you want to deal with it ASAP because they do have a time limit. I can't remember what it is though.
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spork
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« Reply #31 on: May 30, 2016, 3:03:58 am »

Reviving this thread. Vision benefits changed because my employer switched health insurance providers; could not see usual ophthalmologist anymore.  Saw optometrist instead, who did the same exam with the same kind of equipment. I have been wearing reading glasses for years, but my far vision is getting blurry too. The optometrist said  I had some mild astigmatism in addition to presbyopia. The prescription reads as follows:

OD +1.75 -0.75 X 090
OS +1.75 -0.50 X 085

I've figured out what the above means, but after this is "+ 1.75 add" and then a scribble that might be "all" or "dl" or something else. I don't know if that scribble is important.

I checked the Walmart website and the cheapest eyeglasses that look ok (Contour wire frames, progressive bifocal anti-scratch/impact-resistant lenses) with this prescription are $138.  Any recommendations?
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a.k.a. gum-chewing monkey in a Tufts University jacket

"There are no bad ideas, only great ideas that go horribly wrong."

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little_girl_lurking
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« Reply #32 on: May 30, 2016, 12:23:07 pm »

Reviving this thread. Vision benefits changed because my employer switched health insurance providers; could not see usual ophthalmologist anymore.  Saw optometrist instead, who did the same exam with the same kind of equipment. I have been wearing reading glasses for years, but my far vision is getting blurry too. The optometrist said  I had some mild astigmatism in addition to presbyopia. The prescription reads as follows:

OD +1.75 -0.75 X 090
OS +1.75 -0.50 X 085

I've figured out what the above means, but after this is "+ 1.75 add" and then a scribble that might be "all" or "dl" or something else. I don't know if that scribble is important.

I checked the Walmart website and the cheapest eyeglasses that look ok (Contour wire frames, progressive bifocal anti-scratch/impact-resistant lenses) with this prescription are $138.  Any recommendations?
Okay, caveat that I'm just a physics teacher who teaches a little of this stuff at a super general level.

The +1.75 add is definitely the bifocals part.  The scribble might be PAL, which means you have to use a different number for progressive bifocals vs. regular bifocals.  Since you're wanting progressives, that +1.75 is the number you want anyway, so you're good.  Here's a random explanation from an online eyeglass provider: http://www.aclens.com/How-to-Read-Your-Eyeglass-Prescription-c172.html

I buy my glasses from Walmart (single vision, polycarbonate, pretty myopic), and $138 seems pretty good to me.
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spork
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« Reply #33 on: May 31, 2016, 2:38:05 pm »

I belong to a warehouse membership club that has an optical department, so I went there. Given that I've never worn anything but  cheapo reading glasses before, I wanted to try on frames before buying. The club was also running two different "sales" to attract business. Here is the grossly inflated list price:

- frame = $140
- each polycarbonate lens  = $218
- Teflon clear coat per lens = $45

Total: $666

Cost to me = $216.

More expensive than Walmart, but I'm ok with it. 39dollarglasses generates a price of $205 for what look to be the same kind of lenses.
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a.k.a. gum-chewing monkey in a Tufts University jacket

"There are no bad ideas, only great ideas that go horribly wrong."

"Please do not force people who are exhausted to take medication for hallucinations." -- Memo from the Chair, Department of White Privilege Studies, Fiork University
bibliothecula
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« Reply #34 on: May 31, 2016, 7:04:23 pm »

I've now bought 4 pairs of glasses from Zenni and have loved them all. PD--pupilary distance--is easy to measure yourself using an everyday rule with CM markings. Zenni does regular, bifocal, and tinted lenses, and I've had no trouble with them at all.
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old_school
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« Reply #35 on: June 15, 2016, 5:05:49 pm »

Thanks @little_girl_lurking .. very useful link.
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Simplify.
spork
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« Reply #36 on: June 23, 2016, 6:04:41 am »

I now have my prescription progressive bifocals, and I'm not liking them. There is a horizontally narrow area in which text is in focus. I have to move my head rather than my eyes to read a line of text. Is this normal?
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a.k.a. gum-chewing monkey in a Tufts University jacket

"There are no bad ideas, only great ideas that go horribly wrong."

"Please do not force people who are exhausted to take medication for hallucinations." -- Memo from the Chair, Department of White Privilege Studies, Fiork University
little_girl_lurking
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« Reply #37 on: June 23, 2016, 11:10:44 am »

I now have my prescription progressive bifocals, and I'm not liking them. There is a horizontally narrow area in which text is in focus. I have to move my head rather than my eyes to read a line of text. Is this normal?
First instinct is to say yes (again with the caveat that I'm not an eye doctor, I just teach optics).  The process they use to make the progressive lenses all smooth and line-less in the center causes aberrations away from the center, so looking off to one side, especially if you're looking down (that puts you very far away from the center), can be pretty blurry. 

I've read about there being an adjustment period to that kind of lens.  How long have you been wearing them?
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spork
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« Reply #38 on: June 23, 2016, 12:07:06 pm »

Just a few days. But if the traditional dual-lens bifocals lack the off-center aberration then I've wasted $235.
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a.k.a. gum-chewing monkey in a Tufts University jacket

"There are no bad ideas, only great ideas that go horribly wrong."

"Please do not force people who are exhausted to take medication for hallucinations." -- Memo from the Chair, Department of White Privilege Studies, Fiork University
egilson
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« Reply #39 on: June 23, 2016, 12:31:56 pm »

Just a few days. But if the traditional dual-lens bifocals lack the off-center aberration then I've wasted $235.

Spork, this was exactly my experience with progressive lenses. It was even worse at computer-screen distance, where I had about a 1" wide area of focus. I took them back after a month and had the optician make me trifocals.
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aside
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« Reply #40 on: June 24, 2016, 8:28:00 am »

I now have my prescription progressive bifocals, and I'm not liking them. There is a horizontally narrow area in which text is in focus. I have to move my head rather than my eyes to read a line of text. Is this normal?

It is normal in my experience.  I bought my first pair at a brick-and-mortar place and went back and forth with them several times because I could not see well unless looking directly ahead.  I was told I would get used to them.  I suppose I have, at least in the sense that I automatically look directly at things and do not rely on peripheral vision.  I have an older pair of traditional bifocals that I had tinted to use as sunglasses, and I am always struck by how much better my field of vision is when I wear them.  In my case, though, the distortion of the progressive bifocals is exacerbated by the fact that I have to have the reduced-thickness lenses because of the strength of my prescription.
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johnny_dollar
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« Reply #41 on: June 24, 2016, 11:22:04 am »

I now have my prescription progressive bifocals, and I'm not liking them. There is a horizontally narrow area in which text is in focus. I have to move my head rather than my eyes to read a line of text. Is this normal?

My father switched to regular bifocals due to this back when he first had to get them.  He tried the progressive lenses and found he was moving his head and the paper more when wearing them than if he just used his readers over his regular glasses and he had trouble with reading on the computer montior.  He switched to regular bifocals after a couple of months with the progressives.  He said he just couldn't get used to them.
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