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Author Topic: 2010 TT cohort, welcome!  (Read 74836 times)
heywhynots
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« Reply #120 on: May 07, 2012, 9:06:25 AM »

Anyone else have a 2nd year review?  We have one and then a third year review (really a 2.5 year review).  With the 2nd year, they can say bye to me and I am out.  With the third year, I get to stay through my 4th year.  Binder is mostly together. Revising my teaching statement. 

I am at a top 50 SLAC in the sciences.  My teaching evaluations are great both from students and peers.  I have a small external research grant along with a slew of internal grants that have supported a number of independent studies with students, positive reviews on a declined large grant, since hired 5 publications have been published and I am writing a review, 4 presentations with students, and my service has been good.  I am not worried and neither is the department.  Looking at my binder I am feeling good.  Now I just need to troubleshoot the issues my students are having in lab and crank out a paper with undergraduate co-authors.
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ex_mo
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« Reply #121 on: November 28, 2012, 3:13:33 PM »

Bumping this because I just had my third year review.  Whew!  Glad that is over.

Anyone else pass this milestone?
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heywhynots
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« Reply #122 on: November 28, 2012, 7:52:58 PM »

Putting together my 3rd year packet.  Second year went well. Teaching evaluations have been strong as I mentioned before, both student and peer.  Publications stemming from post doc work published.  Two grants, one starter and since my 2nd year review one large grant funded. Service work strong and well liked by the administration. At a SLAC in the sciences, it is looking very good.
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spamicide
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« Reply #123 on: December 05, 2012, 2:47:32 AM »

Just submitted my packet last Friday (12/1).  Will get department feedback in mid January and administration feedback in early February.  Cool thing was a significant external grant hit about one week before I had to submit my packet.  That will help things along!

Good luck to others.
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heywhynots
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« Reply #124 on: December 24, 2012, 8:13:06 AM »

Got the official departmental approval.  It is going on up the food chain.  Won't hear until Feb or March. 

Now just have to finish that grading.  At least I don't have to write letters like my departmental colleagues on my behalf.
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heywhynots
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« Reply #125 on: March 07, 2013, 10:46:49 AM »

How is everyone doing?  Finally got word that the board approved my reappointment and my junior leave.  Looking forward to a year focussed on research and working with my undergraduates in the laboratory.  Grant is paying for a year leave at full pay which is nice. 


Side note - We are less active than the other cohorts (even our first year).  Reflection of the market at the time?  My school typically brings in on average 10 (plus/minus 3) new tenure-track faculty each year.  My year only three of us total.  Others find the 2010 cohort smaller than typical cohorts at their institution?
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msparticularity
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« Reply #126 on: March 10, 2013, 12:06:05 AM »

Hey, everyone--I'm joining you here, if that's okay, because thanks to my move this past year I'm on a schedule to come up for tenure with this cohort. (I originally was in the 2008 cohort, but took a new position at a SLAC that just gave me two years of credit--fairly normal for a move upward, I guess, but a bit frustrating.)

Anyway, heywhynots, good news about your reappointment and junior leave! We don't routinely get any kind of leave until post-tenure sabbatical, but the research support generally is very good. I can apply for research leave before that, so we'll see how next year goes.

I'm having a second-year review this year, later than all of you, then will go up for the fourth-year review (the biggie here) next year with those of you who have a fourth-year process. I'm nervous on one level, but also very happy with the senior faculty members on my review committee. One of them is a trusted senior colleague, and has been available to me when I've needed to figure out the stuff that comes with moving into an entirely new setting.

And yeah--I do think the 2010 cohort was quite small everywhere. That was the year the federal stimulus funds ran out.
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"Once admit that the sole verifiable or fruitful object of knowledge is the particular set of changes that generate the object of study...and no intelligible question can be asked about what, by assumption, lies outside." John Dewey

"Be particular." Jill Conner Browne
heywhynots
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« Reply #127 on: March 15, 2013, 1:10:32 PM »

msparticularity welcome to the 2010 cohort.

Can see how frustrating that would be.  Where I am at now typically doesn't award time towards tenure here if you are at the assistant level so some credit is better than none.  They only grant if you were already awarded tenure elsewhere. 

A 4th year review makes more sense if you have a 2nd year review.  We have a 2nd year at the end of 2nd academic year.  Our 3rd year review is then at the end of the fall semester.  Not a lot of time to show improvement if it is needed. 
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ex_mo
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« Reply #128 on: April 07, 2013, 1:37:49 PM »

Interested to see this, msp, because I'm currently contemplating the "time towards tenure" question myself.  I just accepted a position at a regional comprehensive that I'm very excited about.  I'm in my third year on the TT at a LAC and would have gone up for tenure here in two years.  NewSchool has suggested that I take two years credit towards tenure which would mean I would go up for tenure there in my third year there (Fall 2015).   

I suppose I should be annoyed at "losing" that third year on the tenure track but instead I'm nervous about being ready for tenure in two years.  This is a definite step up in terms of research expectations, so I will have to hit the ground running and I guess I'm just nervous about being productive in the first year there.  It doesn't help that I do qualitative research, which is more time consuming that other types of research in my field. I have the skills necessary to do some of the "faster" types of research, but its not really my strong suit. 

My new chair seems to think I will be ready.  I appreciate her enthusiasm, of course, but the last thing I want to have happen is to go up for tenure when I'm not ready.   

WWTFD?
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msparticularity
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« Reply #129 on: April 07, 2013, 2:49:15 PM »

Ex_mo, I'm confused by the count; if you go in with two years of credit, how would you be going up for tenure after just two years there (or a total of four years instead of five)? The ordinary thing would be for you to go up after your fifth total year--so two years of credit plus three years there.
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"Once admit that the sole verifiable or fruitful object of knowledge is the particular set of changes that generate the object of study...and no intelligible question can be asked about what, by assumption, lies outside." John Dewey

"Be particular." Jill Conner Browne
ex_mo
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Peddler of backroom smut.


« Reply #130 on: April 07, 2013, 6:52:24 PM »

It confuses me too, msp!  Which is part of my angst.  At my current institution, I was scheduled to submit my materials in the fall of my fifth year, with the decision to be made that spring, and the first tenured contract being my sixth year.  So I guess that's not really that normal, but it functionally meant that I would need to be ready to go up for tenure after four years.   

The minimum requirements for promotion and tenure at the new place are 6 years of service, but faculty submit their materials in that sixth year.  So, yes, you're right.  According to the official policies, I would go up after five total years (three years there). 

But the chair has made comments about this that have confused me and I don't have anything in writing.  Either way, I'm nervous about being ready, even after 3 years. 
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msparticularity
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Assistant Professor cum bricoleur


« Reply #131 on: April 07, 2013, 9:48:54 PM »

It confuses me too, msp!  Which is part of my angst.  At my current institution, I was scheduled to submit my materials in the fall of my fifth year, with the decision to be made that spring, and the first tenured contract being my sixth year.  So I guess that's not really that normal, but it functionally meant that I would need to be ready to go up for tenure after four years.   

The minimum requirements for promotion and tenure at the new place are 6 years of service, but faculty submit their materials in that sixth year.  So, yes, you're right.  According to the official policies, I would go up after five total years (three years there). 

But the chair has made comments about this that have confused me and I don't have anything in writing.  Either way, I'm nervous about being ready, even after 3 years. 

Okay, so the first thing to do is to get some confirmation of the timing in writing--probably just emailed, though. Just ask straight out about your confusion. Then, talk about the publication requirements for tenure. Fairly often, when one goes in with credit one also gets to count some previous pubs toward tenure.

Most importantly, find out precisely what they want, and what will count--acceptances? Or must things actually be in print? Will anything peer-reviewed count, or must articles be empirical research? I ask because in my field, there is considerable variability as to whether one can count scholarly peer-reviewed articles that are not empirical. This has been an issue for me, since I'm an educational philosopher! There are certainly people in your field who write historical and/or methodological works, and that can be one way to keep things moving between qual studies involving human subjects--if those types of articles would count!
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"Once admit that the sole verifiable or fruitful object of knowledge is the particular set of changes that generate the object of study...and no intelligible question can be asked about what, by assumption, lies outside." John Dewey

"Be particular." Jill Conner Browne
joeroberts
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« Reply #132 on: April 19, 2013, 10:47:17 AM »

Just thought I'd check in.

I had my third, peer-reviewed, sole-authored paper accepted today, heading toward the end of my third year. I'm busy writing the fourth and the fifth is on deck.  That's sort of what i'm planning to submit with. 
I'm a little concerned with my teaching evaluations (they've been low), but my courses this year are more favourable. Second-year Canadian politics (my specialty) and a 4th-year seminar on public opinion, and I think I really nailed a second year course on public relations I taught this year too.  Let's not talk about teaching 2nd and 3rd year research methods.  Ouch. 

Going forward I need to keep focussing on the writing and do something to at least be able to make the case that I'm taking the low teaching evaluations seriously and trying to make some improvements.

I wouldn't say I'm in the clear yet. I definitely need at least one more peer-reviewed article and to address my teaching evaluations, but I'm getting there.

Hope all is well.
jr
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runtbfit
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« Reply #133 on: April 24, 2013, 4:39:12 PM »

I am interested in finding out if anyone is in a situation where their Dean has announced that he/she will be leaving in two years. I find this a bit unnerving as I have been advised to go up for tenure early while our Dean is still in the seat. My Dean has been very supportive of me and indicated in this year's review that I should do everything possible to go up in my fifth year while he is still there - as long as I keep up the pace that I have established thus far. I think that it would mean about 6 more pubs in the the next two years and maintain a decent teaching record. My fear is if I go up early and I don't get it, then will that send a negative message to whoever the new Dean is in year six?

I am at a R1 and there is a fair amount of emphasis placed on grant procurement, although the current Dean does not push this as heavily as those in some of the other colleges. This is because he recognizes that in my particular field there are few grants to be gotten. My hope is the new Dean has the same insight.

Anyone out there in a similar situation?
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sushiaddict
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« Reply #134 on: May 24, 2013, 1:39:24 AM »

Hello, 2010 TTers! Just wanted to check in with everyone now that summer is here (are almost here) and see how everyone felt at the close of the 3rd year.

runtbfit, I haven't been in that situation so I don't have good advice; what do your senior colleagues say? I had a new dean a couple of years ago in my college and doesn't seem to have affected people who have gone up for tenure. I would see where you are at in a year and then evaluate.

joeroberts, glad to hear that you are getting there; hopefully you can have a chance to relax some this summer, too.

mrsp, a very belated welcome to the 2010 track! How are you feeling about things after your first year at your new college?

My main reflection at this point is that I am tired. So.very.tired. I love what I do but there is just too much of it sometimes.
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