Is this a flipped class?

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frogfactory:
With this class, you pretty much rely on the book which makes it harder for students who aren’t as interested in the subject.”.

This strikes me as sad.  Not only do Millennials apparently need to be sat down and forcibly made to do what they ought to be doing outside class, in class, but they're doing it at the expense of actual lecture and the opportunity to hear talks from real scholars specialised in their topic.  And, further, this reduced learning opportunity and increased hand-holding is still setting the bar too high for some.

When I first saw Good Will Hunting, my response to his rant about how he could get a university level education for the cost of a library card was "Yeah, good luck with that".  If classes like this become standard, he'll be quite right.

I'm sure I'm old fashioned, but I mourn the demise of the lecture, and the fact that overscheduled (?disorganised) undergrads apparently can't be trusted to take responsibility for their learning outside set class periods.

melba_frilkins:
"Students said the classes lack structure and that coming to class under-prepared can mean an hour of feeling lost. "

Yeah, so come to class prepared.

frogfactory:
I just don't understand how an hour of straight lecture can possibly be less useful than an interactive activity that is mainly things students should be doing anyway.

Yes, teach the students you have.  Just don't admit the ones you don't want.

cc_alan:
Quote from: frogfactory on January 30, 2013,  4:50:58 AM

I just don't understand how an hour of straight lecture can possibly be less useful than an interactive activity that is mainly things students should be doing anyway.


We have a thread that discusses what some of us are trying to do. Since you don't understand it, read up on it and educate yourself about it.

Consider it an activity for you to do instead of me simply lecturing you about it.

Alan

polly_mer:
Quote from: frogfactory on January 30, 2013,  4:13:13 AM

I'm sure I'm old fashioned, but I mourn the demise of the lecture, and the fact that overscheduled (?disorganised) undergrads apparently can't be trusted to take responsibility for their learning outside set class periods.


Have you ever taken a physics or engineering class at the college level?  If not, then your opinions on what works in that classroom are completely irrelevant.

Have you ever become proficient at physics or engineering at the college level?  If not, then you really have no clue what is required to become proficient.

I was scolded recently on The Venting Thread for pooh-poohing the idea of an unwelcoming environment for women and minorities in physics and engineering.  You know what research on the learning of physics and engineering has shown works well for everyone, but particularly people who have weak backgrounds in the things required to do well in intro physics and engineering?  Doing group work in class and being forced to engage with the material and asking questions where help is readily available is the single biggest way to help those underprepared students.  Doing that well does require a ton of work by the professor and helpers, but what GW is doing (from all accounts I've read) is properly implemented if the students would stop waiting for a lecture and engage with the material. 

Lecture on these particular topics is the least effective form of teaching for these particular topics based on the research done on physics education by physicists with help from social scientists who know how to set up the studies on people.

Be sure to be dismissive of yet another thing in which you have zero experience or clue.  That really adds to your credibility.

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