Plagiarism Chronicles

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proftowanda:
I recently found on the Princeton U site a useful statement about international students and plagiarism, offered here in the event that it also helps others in incorporating a similar statement into syllabi and/or in knowing that this misery has company: http://www.princeton.edu/pr/pub/integrity/pages/cite/

prisonerofcanada:
I gave an assignment to a large class with 2-3 sentence answers. Even with such short pieces, it was often clear where the student's style stopped and Wikipedia (etc.) began. Some students encased the quoted parts in "" and gave a reference. Others did not. When the students were given 0 for plagiarism got their grades, a group of them came up to protest that they had worked with their friends who had done the same thing and not received Fs. I asked if their friends had put in quote marks and references. This particular group of students could not seem to understand why this would make a difference. None of them had provided any references at all. Some included quote marks but no references--were they quoting my lecture? An unnamed source? Or were the quotation marks "used" for "emphasis"? The mind boggles.

All our syllabi have a plagiarism boilerplate by university decree. This mandates failing grades for plagiarism. I fear the wording has just become background noise, like those agreements in software (has anyone ever read one, ever?)

PoC

fosca:
I've just run into something like that, teaching as an online adjunct for a new school.  I ran the papers and my suggested grades past the adjunct mentor person, and I'm waiting to see if they agree with my (quite reasonable--to me, of course) policy.  If they don't, well, I may not be teaching for them again.  I refuse to let plagiarism occur without penalty, and given the amount of information about plagiarism I've given these students, they have no excuse.

yeahjunct:
Quote from: prisonerofcanada on September 19, 2013,  9:59:03 am

All our syllabi have a plagiarism boilerplate by university decree. This mandates failing grades for plagiarism. I fear the wording has just become background noise, like those agreements in software (has anyone ever read one, ever?)


I wonder that, too, but then I think, "Who taught them to write?" Is it possible that no one in high school or any prior college course ever mentioned plagiarism? Do they think that any instructor would assign them the task of copying and pasting stuff from the internet?

I always have a healthy amount of skepticism when an adult of normal intelligence doesn't know that outright plagiarism isn't okay. I mean, I heard this from more than one grad student I used to tutor. (Really!) I didn't believe it then, mostly because I was in the same grad program and we all had a required workshop that dealt with academic honesty. I don't believe it from my students now because I was the one who told them numerous times that it wasn't okay. I suspect that, most of the time, this is just something people say when they get caught.

infopri:
Quote from: yeahjunct on September 19, 2013, 12:00:29 pm

I suspect that, most of the time, this is just something people say when they get caught.


Yup.  And they promise with all their hearts that they will never plagiarize again--and then they do.

Most of the time, they know exactly what they're doing.  They simply don't care, and/or they believe they won't get caught.

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