• November 1, 2014
November 01, 2014, 10:10:33 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with your Chronicle username and password
News: Talk online about your experiences as an adjunct, visiting assistant professor, postdoc, or other contract faculty member.
 
Pages: 1 ... 1498 1499 [1500] 1501 1502 ... 1896
  Print  
Author Topic: "favorite" student e-mails  (Read 4237669 times)
usukprof
Not sure he's been around long enough to really be a
Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 10,607

.


« Reply #22485 on: January 07, 2013, 9:11:49 PM »

There's no way I'd give students my phone numbers.  Really, who is going to call and "need" an immediate response?  Students who have waited until the last minute.  Not my problem.

That said, I usually answer emails almost any time.  I can quickly see what they need, give clear instructions and/or links, and it's all written down for them.  If they are particularly rude or annoying, I can take the time to formulate a calm, effective response and forward the whole thing to the appropriate PTB.  Student claims I never responded to their pleas for help?  Here's the email showing when the first request happened and my response.

I love that my voicemail is now available as emails (sort of).  I hated listening to long rambling messages, then rapid, mumbled phone numbers.  It was also not easy to save inappropriate messages for evidence.

If you have an online course, it is important to check email quite frequently, but there's no need for anyone to be able to call you.  If you don't need 911, it's not an emergency.  If you do need them, don't call me.

I'm not dissing anyone who would prefer a phone call, but I am slamming any uni that would require faculty to be on call constantly or to give students access to a resource that faculty pay for.

Yup, I agree.  I make my mobile number public because it is my choice to make my life easier.  If my uni were to require it, I'd expect them to provide the mobile phone and account to me.  And no way would I give out my home phone, no matter what they 'required'.
Logged

Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life, son.  --Dean Vernon Wormer
chemystery
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,040


« Reply #22486 on: January 08, 2013, 1:16:37 AM »

See, it's stories like this that make me uneasy about giving my personal phone numbers to students.  I've never done it before; in fact, we're usually cautioned not to do it.  So imagine my surprise when I was told that I MUST provide this information to students by my new (and definitely temporary) boss.  "How else are they going to contact you, since you're an adjunct?" says NADTB.  "By e-mail," says puzzled me.  "But they have to be able to call you."  Yeah, right.  They'll get a Google voice number, get dumped straight into voice mail that will transcribed into e-mail.  When I brought up the potential for phone harassment (to say the least), NADTB looked like that was an unheard of phenomenon.

Jesus. If the school wants students to be able to call you, it's on them to give you a phone. I don't have a university phone and so students can't call me, period.

I was at a conference talk recently at which the presenter described his school's policy.  Cell phones were provided to all instructors.  They were allowed to designate a certain number of hours during which they would sleep and students should not call.  They were otherwise expected to take calls at any time.  The presenter seemed to think this was great.  I thought it would be a good reason to update my CV.

My god.

If this is the school that I'm familiar with that has such a policy, I will add that they have no tenure, just three-year contracts.  I have met a faculty member from this institution; they have many faculty who are looking for opportunities elsewhere.

It was a school in Georgia.  I don't recall whether he mentioned anything about tenure.
Logged

"Nolite te bastardes carborundorum"  --The Handmaid's Tale
kiana
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 2,399


« Reply #22487 on: January 08, 2013, 2:03:59 AM »

I was at a conference talk recently at which the presenter described his school's policy.  Cell phones were provided to all instructors.  They were allowed to designate a certain number of hours during which they would sleep and students should not call.  They were otherwise expected to take calls at any time.  The presenter seemed to think this was great.  I thought it would be a good reason to update my CV.

My god.

If this is the school that I'm familiar with that has such a policy, I will add that they have no tenure, just three-year contracts.  I have met a faculty member from this institution; they have many faculty who are looking for opportunities elsewhere.

It was a school in Georgia.  I don't recall whether he mentioned anything about tenure.

Honestly I would rather not be in academia at all than work at a school with a policy like that. Are their faculty just not allowed to shower, have sex, bathe children, cook, or do anything else that can't be dropped to chat with students outside of these hours?
Logged

If robbers ever broke into my house to search for money, I'd just laugh and search with them.
dr_know
Chocolate-loving, red pen-toting
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 4,737


« Reply #22488 on: January 08, 2013, 2:22:04 AM »

There's no way I'd give students my phone numbers.  Really, who is going to call and "need" an immediate response?  Students who have waited until the last minute.  Not my problem.

That said, I usually answer emails almost any time.  I can quickly see what they need, give clear instructions and/or links, and it's all written down for them.  If they are particularly rude or annoying, I can take the time to formulate a calm, effective response and forward the whole thing to the appropriate PTB.  Student claims I never responded to their pleas for help?  Here's the email showing when the first request happened and my response.

I love that my voicemail is now available as emails (sort of).  I hated listening to long rambling messages, then rapid, mumbled phone numbers.  It was also not easy to save inappropriate messages for evidence.

If you have an online course, it is important to check email quite frequently, but there's no need for anyone to be able to call you.  If you don't need 911, it's not an emergency.  If you do need them, don't call me.

I'm not dissing anyone who would prefer a phone call, but I am slamming any uni that would require faculty to be on call constantly or to give students access to a resource that faculty pay for.

This.
Logged

It's a real shame I'm too young and too poor to retire...
^Listen to Dr. Know.  She Knows.
chemystery
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,040


« Reply #22489 on: January 08, 2013, 3:04:23 AM »

I was at a conference talk recently at which the presenter described his school's policy.  Cell phones were provided to all instructors.  They were allowed to designate a certain number of hours during which they would sleep and students should not call.  They were otherwise expected to take calls at any time.  The presenter seemed to think this was great.  I thought it would be a good reason to update my CV.

My god.

If this is the school that I'm familiar with that has such a policy, I will add that they have no tenure, just three-year contracts.  I have met a faculty member from this institution; they have many faculty who are looking for opportunities elsewhere.

It was a school in Georgia.  I don't recall whether he mentioned anything about tenure.

Honestly I would rather not be in academia at all than work at a school with a policy like that. Are their faculty just not allowed to shower, have sex, bathe children, cook, or do anything else that can't be dropped to chat with students outside of these hours?

Through the magic of bluetooth, you should be able to do all of these while answering student questions.  Except possibly showering.  Maybe you could find a water-tight covering for the earpiece.

Logged

"Nolite te bastardes carborundorum"  --The Handmaid's Tale
cgfunmathguy
Beer-brewing
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 7,793


« Reply #22490 on: January 08, 2013, 8:47:31 AM »

I was at a conference talk recently at which the presenter described his school's policy.  Cell phones were provided to all instructors.  They were allowed to designate a certain number of hours during which they would sleep and students should not call.  They were otherwise expected to take calls at any time.  The presenter seemed to think this was great.  I thought it would be a good reason to update my CV.

My god.

If this is the school that I'm familiar with that has such a policy, I will add that they have no tenure, just three-year contracts.  I have met a faculty member from this institution; they have many faculty who are looking for opportunities elsewhere.

It was a school in Georgia.  I don't recall whether he mentioned anything about tenure.

Honestly I would rather not be in academia at all than work at a school with a policy like that. Are their faculty just not allowed to shower, have sex, bathe children, cook, or do anything else that can't be dropped to chat with students outside of these hours?

Through the magic of bluetooth, you should be able to do all of these while answering student questions.  Except possibly showering.  Maybe you could find a water-tight covering for the earpiece.


Yeah, right. I'm going to have sex with my SO while talking a student through factoring polynomials.

Me: Uh. Uh. Oh, that feels so good. <phone rings> Uh. Uh. Hello?
Stu: Hi, Professor Mathguy, this is Stu Dent in your 9am College Algebra class. I have a question about factoring this polynomial: x^5-5x^4+2x^2-3x+5? I don't know where to start. Can you help me?
Me: Sure thing, Stu. Oh, that's it, honey. Okay, first find the factors of 5, and list those as possibilities for p. Oh, yeahhhhh.
Stu: Uh, are you okay?
Me: Yes. You have p now, right?
Stu: Yes, p = +-1 or +-5.
Me: Mmmmmm. Okay, now find the factors of the leading coefficient. Yeahhhhh.
Stu: Um, okay, that's just 1. That's q, right?
Me: Yes, it is. Oh, Goooooooooooooooooooooooooood.

Really? You want this conversation to happen? Not in my house! I'm not on call after I leave campus. There is no such thing as a mathematical emergency. If you didn't come to office hours (or make an appointment) early enough to clear up your confusion about factoring polynomials, you don't deserve my time the night before the test.
Logged

Alas, greatness and meaning are rarely coterminous with popular familiarity.
cc_alan
is a wossname
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 9,563

Caution! Nekkid Zamboni driver ahead.


« Reply #22491 on: January 08, 2013, 9:47:09 AM »

I'm pretty sure chemystey was not serious based on the cv comment...

Then again, perhaps cgmathfunguy was not serious. Where's an emoticon or lol when I need one?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Alan
Off to search for emoticorns (cross between a unicorn and emoticon)
Logged

Guess what? I got a fever and the only prescription is MORE COWBELL!
cgfunmathguy
Beer-brewing
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 7,793


« Reply #22492 on: January 08, 2013, 11:19:02 AM »

I'm pretty sure chemystey was not serious based on the cv comment...

Then again, perhaps cgmathfunguy was not serious. Where's an emoticon or lol when I need one?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Alan
Off to search for emoticorns (cross between a unicorn and emoticon)
Oh, no. I wasn't entirely serious, but I do enjoy illustrating absurdity by being absurd. Also, I once had an administrator ask me why my cell and home phone numbers weren't on my syllabi. I looked at him and laughed. His response was something along the lines of "What if they need your help after class?". I don't think he liked my response about 10 hours of office hours and being on campus for most of 14 hours during four of the five days a week we taught (due to the way the schedule [which I wrote] needed to be written)*, but he did retreat from the phone number requirement.

*Yes, most of the time I was there, I was on campus for over 60 hours per week at LastJob. I don't do that here.
Logged

Alas, greatness and meaning are rarely coterminous with popular familiarity.
proftowanda
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 6,947

"Righter of wrongs, queen beyond compare."


« Reply #22493 on: January 08, 2013, 11:19:37 AM »

I was at a conference talk recently at which the presenter described his school's policy.  Cell phones were provided to all instructors.  They were allowed to designate a certain number of hours during which they would sleep and students should not call.  They were otherwise expected to take calls at any time.  The presenter seemed to think this was great.  I thought it would be a good reason to update my CV.

My god.

If this is the school that I'm familiar with that has such a policy, I will add that they have no tenure, just three-year contracts.  I have met a faculty member from this institution; they have many faculty who are looking for opportunities elsewhere.

It was a school in Georgia.  I don't recall whether he mentioned anything about tenure.

Honestly I would rather not be in academia at all than work at a school with a policy like that. Are their faculty just not allowed to shower, have sex, bathe children, cook, or do anything else that can't be dropped to chat with students outside of these hours?

Through the magic of bluetooth, you should be able to do all of these while answering student questions.  Except possibly showering.  Maybe you could find a water-tight covering for the earpiece.


Yeah, right. I'm going to have sex with my SO while talking a student through factoring polynomials.

Me: Uh. Uh. Oh, that feels so good. <phone rings> Uh. Uh. Hello?
Stu: Hi, Professor Mathguy, this is Stu Dent in your 9am College Algebra class. I have a question about factoring this polynomial: x^5-5x^4+2x^2-3x+5? I don't know where to start. Can you help me?
Me: Sure thing, Stu. Oh, that's it, honey. Okay, first find the factors of 5, and list those as possibilities for p. Oh, yeahhhhh.
Stu: Uh, are you okay?
Me: Yes. You have p now, right?
Stu: Yes, p = +-1 or +-5.
Me: Mmmmmm. Okay, now find the factors of the leading coefficient. Yeahhhhh.
Stu: Um, okay, that's just 1. That's q, right?
Me: Yes, it is. Oh, Goooooooooooooooooooooooooood.

Really? You want this conversation to happen? Not in my house! I'm not on call after I leave campus. There is no such thing as a mathematical emergency. If you didn't come to office hours (or make an appointment) early enough to clear up your confusion about factoring polynomials, you don't deserve my time the night before the test.

I opted -- as I can at my campus -- to no longer release my home phone number when I got a post-11 p.m. phone call one night, the night before a paper was due, from a student with the equivalent sort of question in the humanities, a panicked call asking how to do footnotes.  (Yes, of course, this had been covered in a class that he had skipped.)

I reminded the student to look in his textbook for models, the footnotes at the end of each chapter.  He said that he did not have his textbook with him, because he was in the library.  I could not refrain from pointing out, in my best Carl Sagan imitation, that the student therefore was surrounded by millions and millions of footnotes . . . and by reference librarians on the late shift, paid to assist with exactly the student's sort of question, so that profs can get some sleep before doing the day shift.  

And even before that, profs may have to get up before dawn to get other students to school, students who do not skip classes.   The phone call had awakened both of my grade-school-age progeny.   It was a long night.

Logged

"Face it, girls.  I'm older, and I have more insurance."     -- Towanda!
mountainguy
The no longer carbonated
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 17,126


« Reply #22494 on: January 08, 2013, 12:26:53 PM »

Don't even get me started on my colleague, who while teaching an online class, thinks it's a "great" idea to tell students that all emails will be answered within two hours, 7 days a week. When challenged about this, colleague's response was "but the student feedback has been phenomenal." Umm, okay. Not the point.
Logged
usukprof
Not sure he's been around long enough to really be a
Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 10,607

.


« Reply #22495 on: January 08, 2013, 12:28:11 PM »

I opted -- as I can at my campus -- to no longer release my home phone number when I got a post-11 p.m. phone call one night, the night before a paper was due, from a student with the equivalent sort of question in the humanities, a panicked call asking how to do footnotes.  (Yes, of course, this had been covered in a class that he had skipped.)

I reminded the student to look in his textbook for models, the footnotes at the end of each chapter.  He said that he did not have his textbook with him, because he was in the library.  I could not refrain from pointing out, in my best Carl Sagan imitation, that the student therefore was surrounded by millions and millions of footnotes . . . and by reference librarians on the late shift, paid to assist with exactly the student's sort of question, so that profs can get some sleep before doing the day shift.  

And even before that, profs may have to get up before dawn to get other students to school, students who do not skip classes.   The phone call had awakened both of my grade-school-age progeny.   It was a long night.

Had student called my mobile phone, it would have vibrated silently in its charging cradle on the other side of the house.  Had they looked up my home phone in the directory and called me, I would have been mightily angry, and not been as civil as you apparently were.
Logged

Fat, drunk, and stupid is no way to go through life, son.  --Dean Vernon Wormer
conjugate
Compulsive punster and insatiable reader, and
Member-Moderator
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 18,778

Tends to have warped sense of humor


« Reply #22496 on: January 08, 2013, 1:04:55 PM »

It was a school in Georgia.  I don't recall whether he mentioned anything about tenure.

That's the one, I'm sure.  It's a fairly new institution, and it does have a policy that all faculty are to have their school-issued phones available to answer student questions after hours, and it only has three-year rolling contracts instead of tenure.  In other words, it's not technically a higher education institution except in name.  The policy was established a few years ago, and I don't know whether they've come to their senses turned away from the dark side decided that the experiment failed in the meantime.
Logged

Unfortunately, I think conjugate gives good advice.
∀ε>0∃δ>0∋|xa|<δ⇒|(x)-(a)|<ε
burnie
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,217


« Reply #22497 on: January 08, 2013, 1:58:16 PM »

There's no way I'd give students my phone numbers.  Really, who is going to call and "need" an immediate response?  Students who have waited until the last minute.  Not my problem.

That said, I usually answer emails almost any time.  I can quickly see what they need, give clear instructions and/or links, and it's all written down for them.  If they are particularly rude or annoying, I can take the time to formulate a calm, effective response and forward the whole thing to the appropriate PTB.  Student claims I never responded to their pleas for help?  Here's the email showing when the first request happened and my response.

I love that my voicemail is now available as emails (sort of).  I hated listening to long rambling messages, then rapid, mumbled phone numbers.  It was also not easy to save inappropriate messages for evidence.

If you have an online course, it is important to check email quite frequently, but there's no need for anyone to be able to call you.  If you don't need 911, it's not an emergency.  If you do need them, don't call me.

I'm not dissing anyone who would prefer a phone call, but I am slamming any uni that would require faculty to be on call constantly or to give students access to a resource that faculty pay for.

Yup, I agree.  I make my mobile number public because it is my choice to make my life easier.  If my uni were to require it, I'd expect them to provide the mobile phone and account to me.  And no way would I give out my home phone, no matter what they 'required'.

If they did have that requirement and didn't supply the phone, would that mean you could write off your phone and cell service altogether as a work expense?
Logged

Corporate America wants people who seem like bold risk takers, but never actually do anything.  - Barney Stinson
chemystery
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,040


« Reply #22498 on: January 08, 2013, 2:20:48 PM »

I'm pretty sure chemystey was not serious based on the cv comment...

Then again, perhaps cgmathfunguy was not serious. Where's an emoticon or lol when I need one?!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

Alan
Off to search for emoticorns (cross between a unicorn and emoticon)

Chemystery was most definitely not being serious.  cgmathfunguy's discussion, does, however, remind her of Dave Barry's explanation for why men are good at math.
Logged

"Nolite te bastardes carborundorum"  --The Handmaid's Tale
mountainguy
The no longer carbonated
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 17,126


« Reply #22499 on: January 08, 2013, 2:34:51 PM »

If they did have that requirement and didn't supply the phone, would that mean you could write off your phone and cell service altogether as a work expense?

Perhaps, but I've always found tax write-offs and deductions to be a nightmare. (I had to go to three different tax preparers last year before I found one who would do what I wanted, even though I knew that what I was requesting was perfectly legal and that I had the necessary records to prove it).
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 1498 1499 [1500] 1501 1502 ... 1896
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.