• May 29, 2016

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May 29, 2016, 11:06:53 pm *
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News: Talk online about your experiences as an adjunct, visiting assistant professor, postdoc, or other contract faculty member.
 
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 1 
 on: Today at 11:03:36 pm 
Started by rose_fingered_dawn - Last post by alleyoxenfree
Go as a group.

If possible, have your supervisor look over both the original grants and the new ones beforehand. He needs to give specifics. It's really up to the PIs - in this case, your supervisor - as to whether to chase a grant. He is there to facilitate that. I have a suspicion that he may not have wanted to do that particular grant. Some are unwieldy and awful but if he can't be specific about the poor fit, he's bluffing.

His time may be limited, so his power may be to say that he only has time to work on one per person and he recommends you apply for the second. Nevertheless, he should be able to set and stick to a timeline. Granting is all about deadlines and even if he has other grants to do, on deadline, if he is an "expert," he should know fairly well how much time a given grant will take.

Once he sets and you commit to a timeline, you are perfectly within your rights to simply say, this is when I will be able to work on it. I won't be available in the summer so it needs to be done now. Asking your supervisor for help, especially now that his supervisor approached you, is perfectly appropriate, in my book. Especially because John seems to be having issues with the very people he was hired to help.

Other forumites might weigh in. Good luck!

Also, I would reframe yourself away from the anxiety, at least for public purposes. Don't let them pigeonhole you.
Everyone gets upset.  Choose a new brand for these purposes - you are a great multitasker but others need to do their part. You get stressed when they don't meet their own deadlines.

Start saying things like, "I'm of course CONCERNED that these funds come in. The whole lab has a great number of things that WE must coordinate. WE need to be able to plan so it is, of course, a CONCERN when others don't stick to the plan. WE're on a tight timeline."  Etc.

 2 
 on: Today at 10:26:33 pm 
Started by academicpop - Last post by k_guy
My last campus visit one of the faculty told me that hu was looking for another job. 

Wow, that would have put a huge dent in my interest for the job. But YMMV.

Did you at least get to ask why they were looking elsewhere?
I would absolutely have asked that, both of the person who wanted to leave and the other faculty.

 3 
 on: Today at 10:07:11 pm 
Started by rose_fingered_dawn - Last post by happyelephant
Quote
Can you clarify why John would have the authority to veto a grant you had prepared, and that had already gone through internal review? Is he your supervisor?

He is not my supervisor. John is a part time consultant that's been hired because of his expertise in grant writing. Our entire organization is grant funded, so our program development folks are always super busy with the big grants that keep the lights on and pay everyone's salaries. John was hired specifically to help junior people write grants. So he ends up with veto power over our grants, because if he says the grant isn't good, it won't be submitted through the grant office.

Quote
Did he give any reasons? Like, there is a technical point of eligibility that no one caught before?

He said it wouldn't be funded by the agency I was applying to, because it wasn't good enough. It wasn't a technical point - more that it was too practical for this agency, and they wouldn't be interested.  I think he's probably right, although it's hard to tell - it got one very positive internal review and one lukewarm internal review.

Quote
Where are the more senior faculty members in your department who would have a vested interest in your getting this funding? It sounds like he is manipulating the situation by spinning things for his supervisor. At the very least, I would not go to this meeting alone. I would go with someone who relies on me to do research for them, who hired me, or who has a vested interest in our collective department advancing scholarship.

This is really great advice.  I was thinking I should be able to handle this myself, but it's a tricky situation and it's probably wise to ask for help. I can absolutely talk to my supervisor and ask her to sit in on the meeting. I've mentioned the troubles with John previously, and she's quite supportive of my research and wants this grant to work out. I think I'm also the second of her employees who has had issues working with John (another person in my position also had a grant vetoed for a similar reason). 

 4 
 on: Today at 09:54:49 pm 
Started by fiona - Last post by fiona
I wouldn't presume to delve into what Starr knows about irony and when he knew it.

Getting inside his head would make me feel slimed.

The Fiona

This could be the basis for an entertaining academic novel.

Do you think he has an interesting inner life, with thoughts he daren't utter in public?

The Fiona, wondering what thoughts

I don't know whether he has an inner life, but I find it interesting and strange that the highs and lows of his career all seem to revolve around how *other* men with power and influence treat women with less power.  I wonder how he views his own role, and how that differs from how the outside world sees him. 

He's been married to the same woman since 1970, and she's said to be a "philanthropist" and have various other volunteer functions.

They don't seem very interesting, so maybe he does get his jollies from interacting with powerful men and less powerful women.   

I don't think he's been a great contributor to American society.

The Fiona

 5 
 on: Today at 09:44:32 pm 
Started by see_wolf - Last post by wellfleet
California Dreamin'

 6 
 on: Today at 09:42:25 pm 
Started by see_wolf - Last post by wellfleet
change agent

 7 
 on: Today at 09:26:28 pm 
Started by mathofsorts - Last post by mleok
Put another way, can your current department even accommodate you with the lab space you would need to perform the experiments you're interested in learning how to do? Why get a Ph.D. In a secondary field whose job prospects in academia are sufficiently bad that you would have to win the lottery a second time to be successful at winning a substantial NIH grant on your own?

 8 
 on: Today at 09:22:57 pm 
Started by mathofsorts - Last post by mleok
Nah - it is not about getting full. That is fine. You are correct that it would not help (even if I had time between now and August to do it). I am just interested in it.  Peeling away a chunk of time to focus outside of my area  is what my question really is about. And getting funded to do it.

I don't think that getting a second Ph.D. Is going to give you the credibility necessary to be more successful in securing funding. This is truly where you should be getting a collaborator who is an experimentalist and can help you validate the modeling that you do, and explore the implications of the modeling predictions.

 9 
 on: Today at 09:18:45 pm 
Started by mathofsorts - Last post by mamselle
My immediate thought was, "you'd have to be rich, bored, and have a lot of time on your hands to think that would be a good idea under the circumstances you describe."

But it's a healthier pursuit than many rich, bored folks get up to, so if that's what ticks your clock, go for it.

M.

 10 
 on: Today at 08:37:19 pm 
Started by fiona - Last post by terpsichore
I wouldn't presume to delve into what Starr knows about irony and when he knew it.

Getting inside his head would make me feel slimed.

The Fiona

This could be the basis for an entertaining academic novel.

Do you think he has an interesting inner life, with thoughts he daren't utter in public?

The Fiona, wondering what thoughts

I don't know whether he has an inner life, but I find it interesting and strange that the highs and lows of his career all seem to revolve around how *other* men with power and influence treat women with less power.  I wonder how he views his own role, and how that differs from how the outside world sees him. 

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