applying for jobs to improve current salary

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skinnedknee:
I'm newly tenured at a regional university where salaries have been stagnant since I arrived 7 years ago. We're public and unionized, so it seems the only way to improve my salary is to get competing offers. So I'm on the market. 

I applied to a job at a policy institute and I've been invited to interview. The more I learn about the job, the less I'm interested in it, and right now the only reason to interview is to elicit a counter-offer from my dean.

Would this be:
(a) realistic? (That is, I can imagine a dean saying that the salary offered by a private DC think-tank is really not relevant for establishing my market-value for academic jobs.)
(b) ethical?

brixton:
It is definitely ethical, although you have to be careful what you wish for.  The Dean could say:  that sounds like a great opportunity for you; I think you should take it... which calls your bluff and makes it hard for you to go back with another offer that is a better comp at a later date.  You finally may not be that valuable to your current department, which can be a tough lesson to learn.    When you start playing this game, you have to be willing and ready to act on the offer.  If you don't, you can taint your relationship with the current administration at the school.  However, as a tenured faculty, you might not care about that.

skinnedknee:
Thanks.

tuxthepenguin:
Quote from: skinnedknee on January 14, 2013,  1:50:31 PM

I'm newly tenured at a regional university where salaries have been stagnant since I arrived 7 years ago. We're public and unionized, so it seems the only way to improve my salary is to get competing offers. So I'm on the market. 

I applied to a job at a policy institute and I've been invited to interview. The more I learn about the job, the less I'm interested in it, and right now the only reason to interview is to elicit a counter-offer from my dean.

Would this be:
(a) realistic? (That is, I can imagine a dean saying that the salary offered by a private DC think-tank is really not relevant for establishing my market-value for academic jobs.)
(b) ethical?


Ethical...what a, shall we say, interesting perspective. When you're dealing with administrators, you ask what's best for you, not what's ethical.

I do not think most nonacademic offers are good bargaining chips. There is a belief (right or wrong) that faculty want to stay in academia. I had a nonacademic offer, told the chair, got no counteroffer. I never threatened to leave. I just said, this is the offer I've got and I'm thinking it over, I'll let you know my decision in a week. I did get a rather large raise down the road as a way to keep me from leaving. One thing I've encountered is a belief by deans that academic jobs are nine-month jobs, so unless the monthly salary is a lot higher, it's not a better offer.

skinnedknee:
I think it seems unethical to feign interest in a job, have this company spend time and money for me come interview, and negotiate a salary only for me to turn around and use it as a bargaining chip. I know it's how the game is played, but it seems like a really crappy thing to do. (I'm not at all worried about the ethics of demanding a larger salary from my dean.)

The salary would be about 40% higher on a per-month basis.

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