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Author Topic: that half-timer  (Read 12697 times)
weathered
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« on: April 19, 2012, 8:36:12 PM »

I have a student in class who stays only half time. He walks in 15 minutes late and walks out 15 minutes early everyday. It happens in the middle of each lecture and I am beginning to get annoyed.
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polly_mer
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« Reply #1 on: April 19, 2012, 8:37:23 PM »

Lock the doors and deny admittance to latecomers.

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tinyzombie
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« Reply #2 on: April 19, 2012, 8:37:51 PM »

It seems to me that the reason that it's happening is because you're letting it.

What have you done to stop him or to address it?
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anisogamy
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« Reply #3 on: April 19, 2012, 8:57:47 PM »

It seems to me that the reason that it's happening is because you're letting it.

What have you done to stop him or to address it?

This.  The generous expectation is that he has three classes scheduled in a row and has trouble getting to yours from the first and to the third from yours, but that still isn't an excuse for his behavior--and many registration systems are set up to disallow consecutive booking of classes at greater than a brief walk between them.
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« Reply #4 on: April 19, 2012, 9:32:45 PM »

It seems to me that the reason that it's happening is because you're letting it.

What have you done to stop him or to address it?

Yes. Particularly when a student gets up to leave early, I stop dead in my tracks. "John! Was it something I said? No? But it is 9:30 and this class goes to 9:50, I don't understand why you are leaving? Are you going to the registrar to get a drop slip for this course? Because if you are not, you had better sit back down and take some notes. And please come to class on time, starting tomorrow. Thanks John."

It is up to you to set the classroom expectations.
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weathered
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« Reply #5 on: April 19, 2012, 9:50:47 PM »

Yeah, I told him about it. I hope he listens. I have been lucky with students so far, but suddenly there is this immature weirdo. It's as bad as last year's ghost--the one who never came (except for the last class) and failed.
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fiona
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« Reply #6 on: April 20, 2012, 2:53:07 AM »

I wrote on the board once, "Please don't wander in and out of class. Stay with us!"

One student got up to go out, and the others pointed at the board. She sat down and stayed.

If she hadn't, I would have e-mailed her to see me before the next class.

The Fiona
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« Reply #7 on: April 20, 2012, 3:23:00 AM »

I don't lock doors, wouldn't if I could, but around the third week of the semester when students wander in 15 minutes late, I just point, mid-sentence, to the door and say, "No, class begins at X:XX".  This semester I sent out two emails that said, "Thanks for stopping by today, but you do realize that leaving half way through class does not count for attending, right?"   Last semester I had a student who would wander in and out of class, fortunately he sat back next to the door which opens onto a very inviting courtyard.  Much to his amazement, and failure, we covered material while he strolled.  Yesterday a student drifted out of class leaving his laptop and blackberry on his desk.  As it turned out, we finished up very early.  I imagine his stuff was waiting for him when he stopped by, but I neither know nor care. I think next fall I will get tougher on the young men who seem to have prostates the size of softballs.

Oh, oh, I just had an evil thought:  I want to pass out Depends on the first day of class.  After all, it is a full 80 minutes.
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infopri
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« Reply #8 on: April 20, 2012, 2:00:04 PM »

I once had a colleague who locked the door when class began.  The banging on the door, IMHO, was far more disruptive than just letting the student quietly enter and slip into a seat in the back (which is what my late students generally do).
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fiona
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« Reply #9 on: April 20, 2012, 2:21:04 PM »

I'm sure locking the door also could get you in trouble with fire regulations.

A writing assignment at the beginning or end of class would encourage the half-timer to drop or disappear entirely.

The Fiona
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polly_mer
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« Reply #10 on: April 20, 2012, 3:57:43 PM »

I once had a colleague who locked the door when class began.  The banging on the door, IMHO, was far more disruptive than just letting the student quietly enter and slip into a seat in the back (which is what my late students generally do).

For the first week when I start locking the door to latecomers, I put a sign on it "Wait quietly here until the door is opened".  When I reach a natural break point, then I open the door.  Students can be trained if one puts in the effort.

To the best of my knowledge, locking the door to keep people out isn't a fire hazard since the door opens from the inside.

I find that the locked door to reentry discourages wandering in and out.  Leaving early generally isn't a problem for me because I don't lecture the whole period.  If people finish the group work or decide not to do the work and leave early, good for them.
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heynonnynonnymouse
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« Reply #11 on: April 20, 2012, 4:00:13 PM »

I'm sure locking the door also could get you in trouble with fire regulations.


You know, I've heard this mentioned a lot, but all classroom doors on my campus only lock to the outside. (That is, students can't come in unless I let them in if I lock it, but anyone can leave.) I don't think I've ever been in a classroom on any campus that locked and couldn't be opened from inside the room...

(On preview, what Polly said.)

I do lock the door one minute after class begins for the first few weeks to discourage lateness, and make a bit of a show of letting them in. It helps me learn names, too, because I make a point of asking and imply that I'm keeping careful track of such things.
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oldadjunct
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LIFO. Enough said.


« Reply #12 on: April 21, 2012, 10:15:39 PM »

I'm sure locking the door also could get you in trouble with fire regulations.


You know, I've heard this mentioned a lot, but all classroom doors on my campus only lock to the outside. (That is, students can't come in unless I let them in if I lock it, but anyone can leave.) I don't think I've ever been in a classroom on any campus that locked and couldn't be opened from inside the room...

(On preview, what Polly said.)

I do lock the door one minute after class begins for the first few weeks to discourage lateness, and make a bit of a show of letting them in. It helps me learn names, too, because I make a point of asking and imply that I'm keeping careful track of such things.

I think one minute is way too restrictive at any point in the semester, but especially in the first weeks of class, unless your campus is dotted with atomic clocks all of which are synchronized and ringed by open parking spaces.  For instance it took me half the semester to discover that there was a 15 minute mid-day window when close in parking was always available on two particular days that I taught a mid-day class.

At the first class of the semester I say nothing to "lates", after that and for the next 2-3 weeks when a student comes late I stop what I am doing and loudly say "Class begins at H:MM, not H:MM."  At about week three I just shake my head and point to the door as students enter > 5 min. late.  Very late in the semester, well past when the group has jelled, I start being more flexible but I will always say something like "John, I thought we were past this, class begins at...." to make the point.  I teach small, interactive classes in small rooms, often the only door or open seat is in the front of the room; if I lectured in a stadium room I probably would not care about "lates", but I don't know.
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heynonnynonnymouse
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« Reply #13 on: April 21, 2012, 10:30:58 PM »

I'm sure locking the door also could get you in trouble with fire regulations.


You know, I've heard this mentioned a lot, but all classroom doors on my campus only lock to the outside. (That is, students can't come in unless I let them in if I lock it, but anyone can leave.) I don't think I've ever been in a classroom on any campus that locked and couldn't be opened from inside the room...

(On preview, what Polly said.)

I do lock the door one minute after class begins for the first few weeks to discourage lateness, and make a bit of a show of letting them in. It helps me learn names, too, because I make a point of asking and imply that I'm keeping careful track of such things.

I think one minute is way too restrictive at any point in the semester, but especially in the first weeks of class, unless your campus is dotted with atomic clocks all of which are synchronized and ringed by open parking spaces.  For instance it took me half the semester to discover that there was a 15 minute mid-day window when close in parking was always available on two particular days that I taught a mid-day class.

At the first class of the semester I say nothing to "lates", after that and for the next 2-3 weeks when a student comes late I stop what I am doing and loudly say "Class begins at H:MM, not H:MM."  At about week three I just shake my head and point to the door as students enter > 5 min. late.  Very late in the semester, well past when the group has jelled, I start being more flexible but I will always say something like "John, I thought we were past this, class begins at...." to make the point.  I teach small, interactive classes in small rooms, often the only door or open seat is in the front of the room; if I lectured in a stadium room I probably would not care about "lates", but I don't know.

1. I do let them in. I just make them wait to be let in. It works.

2. I teach 90% freshman, in a building centrally located amidst all of the on-campus housing. There's nowhere a freshman can live on campus that's more than a 10 minute walk from the building. Generally speaking, if they're late, it's not due to parking or traffic.
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polly_mer
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Have you worked on that project today?


« Reply #14 on: April 22, 2012, 9:48:20 AM »

I'm sure locking the door also could get you in trouble with fire regulations.


You know, I've heard this mentioned a lot, but all classroom doors on my campus only lock to the outside. (That is, students can't come in unless I let them in if I lock it, but anyone can leave.) I don't think I've ever been in a classroom on any campus that locked and couldn't be opened from inside the room...

(On preview, what Polly said.)

I do lock the door one minute after class begins for the first few weeks to discourage lateness, and make a bit of a show of letting them in. It helps me learn names, too, because I make a point of asking and imply that I'm keeping careful track of such things.

I think one minute is way too restrictive at any point in the semester, but especially in the first weeks of class, unless your campus is dotted with atomic clocks all of which are synchronized and ringed by open parking spaces.  For instance it took me half the semester to discover that there was a 15 minute mid-day window when close in parking was always available on two particular days that I taught a mid-day class.

At the first class of the semester I say nothing to "lates", after that and for the next 2-3 weeks when a student comes late I stop what I am doing and loudly say "Class begins at H:MM, not H:MM."  At about week three I just shake my head and point to the door as students enter > 5 min. late.  Very late in the semester, well past when the group has jelled, I start being more flexible but I will always say something like "John, I thought we were past this, class begins at...." to make the point.  I teach small, interactive classes in small rooms, often the only door or open seat is in the front of the room; if I lectured in a stadium room I probably would not care about "lates", but I don't know.

1. I do let them in. I just make them wait to be let in. It works.

2. I teach 90% freshman, in a building centrally located amidst all of the on-campus housing. There's nowhere a freshman can live on campus that's more than a 10 minute walk from the building. Generally speaking, if they're late, it's not due to parking or traffic.

Ditto.

I lock the door when the clock on the wall facing the door states the time. 

I make the announcements about upcoming deadlines and ask for questions.

I unlock the door and let in latecomers. 

I lock the door and run through the day's agenda including any instructions anyone would need for the activities.

I unlock the door and check for latecomers. 

If I'm doing a lecture that day, then I lock the door and do the lecture.  People who are more than 5 minutes late will be standing in the hall for a while at this point, but anyone who was just a minute late is ok.  After the lecture, I unlock the door and prop it open for the rest of class.

I don't do this until the second week because, yeah, people may be trying to figure out where rooms are and which clocks run fast or slow.  However, anyone who is routinely twenty minutes late (and I have students like that) doesn't get to disrupt the only times that we do things as a whole class by walking in front of the class (sneaking in the back is not an option in these classrooms) and blocking the view.
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I've joined a bizarre cult called JordanCanonicalForm's Witnesses.  I have to go from door to door asking people things like, "Good evening, sir!  Do you have a moment to chat about Linear Transformations?"
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