• February 10, 2016
February 10, 2016, 6:50:20 am *
Welcome, Guest. Please Log In to participate in forums.
News: For all you tweeters, follow The Chronicle on Twitter.
 
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4
  Print  
Author Topic: that half-timer  (Read 12770 times)
galactic_hedgehog
Procrastinating, Python-quoting, Blue Blazer-drinking, chocolate-chip cookie-eating, Pastafarian, Not So
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 18,841

Mind Ninja


WWW
« Reply #15 on: April 22, 2012, 5:21:00 pm »

I had a student leave midway through class the other day, then realize he had left his bottle of Coke in the classroom, then come back in and get it and leave immediately again. I still didn't say anything. I am the hugest wimp of classroom management ever.

Next time that happens, just say, "You know, I already spat in it."
Logged

pgryffindor
Junior member
**
Posts: 73

Why is all the rum gone?


« Reply #16 on: April 22, 2012, 6:14:44 pm »

I had a student leave midway through class the other day, then realize he had left his bottle of Coke in the classroom, then come back in and get it and leave immediately again. I still didn't say anything. I am the hugest wimp of classroom management ever.

Me too. I really need to be tougher. I showed a video in class the other day and the same student got up twice to "use the bathroom" in the middle of it. I was really angry but didn't say a word. Perhaps I should have emailed him after class and spoken to him about it then.

Or, there is the student that arrives late all the time because:

A. "Sorry I was working on a scientific computing project."
B. "Sorry I had to finish up a test."
C. "Sorry I had to go talk to my adviser."

I need a stronger backbone. Not this wiggling pile of jello I currently have. UGGGHHHHHHH.

Thank gosh i will have my first semester under my belt in 2 weeks.
Logged

My Hogwarts letter got lost in the mail.
heynonnynonnymouse
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,493


« Reply #17 on: April 22, 2012, 6:35:32 pm »

It does happen that certain students are chronically late because they have a previous class which is really far away.  I'm not saying this is a reason for overlooking it, but it does happen. 

When my students give me that excuse, unless they are first semester freshmen (and generally our advising staff doesn't do this to first semester students, either), I tell them it's their responsibility to schedule classes in walkable distance from one another in the 15 minute "passing" period. It's part of my "first day speech" - I ask them to talk to me about it if they think there's any chance of "regular" lateness, and I advise them to find another section of my class. As there are 20+ every semester (sections of the course I teach, that is) they should have no problem.
Logged
shrek
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 2,072


« Reply #18 on: April 23, 2012, 9:18:50 am »

In my first job, one evening before my class I noticed a couple of students sitting in the hallway outside an open door leaning forward and taking notes. I asked that that was about. Turns out they were students who arrived late and the professor did not allow students past the door if they were late.
Logged
oldfullprof
Ridiculous
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 11,083

Representation is not reproduction!


« Reply #19 on: April 23, 2012, 11:20:35 am »

For me, much of this stuff goes to my desire to avoid control issues with students over rules.  Because I can be personally dominant in a friendly way, I don't tend to impose or implement complicated rules.  That's why I'm usually pumping for smaller syllabi, fewer rubrics, etc.  The class is more, I think, about the quality of presentation and face to face interaction.

Does this lead to a situation that's more chaotic?  No, it doesn't seem to.  Is the situaltion more "unfair?"  Maybe, but since I give leniency and special dispensations to almost anyone, anyone can get a reasonable break.  I do come down harder on the one-month-in-Aruba-at-midsemester types, however.

Too much control underbrush can lead to a legalistic focus rather than a focus on the material.  
« Last Edit: April 23, 2012, 11:22:23 am by oldfullprof » Logged

Taste o' the Sixties
refe8629
New member
*
Posts: 6


« Reply #20 on: April 23, 2012, 12:09:23 pm »

I announce at the first class that they are adults; if they need to come late or leave early, o.k. If they need to talk on their phone, please step out in the hall, but it will count as leaving early. If they do not come, o.k. Unless the absence or the late arrival/early departure is cleared in advance with me for a reasonable reason, I will not allow make up work for that day. It will count as an absence, as they are missing some or all of a class. Three of any reduces their grade one letter grade. I rarely have absences or anything else not cleared in advance.
Logged
cirronimbus
New member
*
Posts: 5


« Reply #21 on: April 23, 2012, 6:57:03 pm »

...hm, interesting topic.
But please, let me ask - is it not horribly condescending to "lock" the door to the classroom - especially for the ones on the inside?! I know the average American college kid is quite young and they often seem to be immature, but is it not much better to actually treat them as adults. They will catch up on the concepts fast. This should be particularly easy in small classes - you know who is walking out early and can send them an email to call them for a meeting.
Frankly, if a professor or lecturer had EVER locked the classroom door while I was sitting in class (undergrad or grad class doesn't matter at what stage in my student days), I would have felt terribly insulted and in turn would have stood up and demanded to be LET OUT immediately - followed by a quick walk to the deans office to file a complaint. I would never accept to be locked in, and sorry by the way, but the argument that the door can be opened from the inside wouldn't cut it. It's the professors gesture that counts.
Logged
tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 16,578

elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #22 on: April 23, 2012, 6:58:25 pm »

Oh good, I get to break out my lawn chair!
Logged

Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
cirronimbus
New member
*
Posts: 5


« Reply #23 on: April 23, 2012, 7:18:04 pm »

...hehe - may I join? (pulls up a really nice deck-chair and hands over a drink of your choice)
Logged
ptarmigan
grad student & chief dork dumpling
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 4,216


« Reply #24 on: April 23, 2012, 7:54:44 pm »

...hm, interesting topic.
But please, let me ask - is it not horribly condescending to "lock" the door to the classroom - especially for the ones on the inside?! I know the average American college kid is quite young and they often seem to be immature, but is it not much better to actually treat them as adults. They will catch up on the concepts fast. This should be particularly easy in small classes - you know who is walking out early and can send them an email to call them for a meeting.
Frankly, if a professor or lecturer had EVER locked the classroom door while I was sitting in class (undergrad or grad class doesn't matter at what stage in my student days), I would have felt terribly insulted and in turn would have stood up and demanded to be LET OUT immediately - followed by a quick walk to the deans office to file a complaint. I would never accept to be locked in, and sorry by the way, but the argument that the door can be opened from the inside wouldn't cut it. It's the professors gesture that counts.

It's clear that the purpose of Polly's policy (ooh, alliteration!) is to keep students out, not in. It's hardly her fault if you can't understand how doors work.
« Last Edit: April 23, 2012, 7:55:09 pm by ptarmigan » Logged

He's on my roster, but if I've taught him anything, it isn't math.
tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 16,578

elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #25 on: April 23, 2012, 8:07:21 pm »

I'm sitting by myself, thanks.
Logged

Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
infopri
I guess I'm now a VERY
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 23,760

When all else fails, let us agree to disagree.


« Reply #26 on: April 23, 2012, 8:17:15 pm »

Frankly, if a professor or lecturer had EVER locked the classroom door while I was sitting in class (undergrad or grad class doesn't matter at what stage in my student days), I would have felt terribly insulted and in turn would have stood up and demanded to be LET OUT immediately - followed by a quick walk to the deans office to file a complaint. I would never accept to be locked in, and sorry by the way, but the argument that the door can be opened from the inside wouldn't cut it. It's the professors gesture that counts.

I don't quite follow your logic, cirronimbus.  If the door can be opened from the inside (and it can--none of us has ever seen a door that locks people in the room), how exactly are you "locked in" and needing to be "LET OUT"??  If you can get out, you're not locked in, and you don't need to be "let" out.

<waves at TZ while pulling up another chair>
Logged

People who do not understand numbers should not be allowed to use them for anything. - DvF

MYOB.  Y enseņen bien a sus hijos.
tinyzombie
She of the Badass Abs, and a
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 16,578

elevate from this point on - chuck d


« Reply #27 on: April 23, 2012, 8:27:44 pm »

Frankly, if a professor or lecturer had EVER locked the classroom door while I was sitting in class (undergrad or grad class doesn't matter at what stage in my student days), I would have felt terribly insulted and in turn would have stood up and demanded to be LET OUT immediately - followed by a quick walk to the deans office to file a complaint. I would never accept to be locked in, and sorry by the way, but the argument that the door can be opened from the inside wouldn't cut it. It's the professors gesture that counts.

I don't quite follow your logic, cirronimbus.  If the door can be opened from the inside (and it can--none of us has ever seen a door that locks people in the room), how exactly are you "locked in" and needing to be "LET OUT"??  If you can get out, you're not locked in, and you don't need to be "let" out.

<waves at TZ while pulling up another chair>

Not to mention, cirronimbus, that your rigid language here -- "insulted," "demanded," "never accept," "cut it," and "complaint" -- shows little attempt to understand the OP's position, or that of any faculty member, among other issues. 

<scoots next to llan>
Logged

Quote from: usukprof
I think we have three of them, but the smallest one seems to be the leader.
Quote from: dolljepopp
Who needs real life when Sandra Bullock is around?
Quote from: systeme_d_
You are all my people, and I love you.
cirronimbus
New member
*
Posts: 5


« Reply #28 on: April 23, 2012, 8:39:51 pm »

OK, fine - I didn't mean to offend anyone. So pull up your chairs over there and exclude other well-meaning contributors. It's quite alright.
But has it never occurred to you how it feels for the (adult) students in your class who are being locked in (figuratively speaking). So what do you do if one of your "good ones" gets a caughing fit or acute case of severe hickups - not allowed to re-enter then, huh? No, but seriously now, I thought there were plenty of others who posted earlier and also had good points about how an effective instructor can manage a class room without having to resort to locking doors. I think it is worthwhile contemplating those suggestions. ...just sayin'
Logged
infopri
I guess I'm now a VERY
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 23,760

When all else fails, let us agree to disagree.


« Reply #29 on: April 23, 2012, 10:09:28 pm »

OK, fine - I didn't mean to offend anyone. So pull up your chairs over there and exclude other well-meaning contributors. It's quite alright.
But has it never occurred to you how it feels for the (adult) students in your class who are being locked in (figuratively speaking). So what do you do if one of your "good ones" gets a caughing fit or acute case of severe hickups - not allowed to re-enter then, huh? No, but seriously now, I thought there were plenty of others who posted earlier and also had good points about how an effective instructor can manage a class room without having to resort to locking doors. I think it is worthwhile contemplating those suggestions. ...just sayin'

I was one of those who dislikes the idea of locking the door, as I see it as counterproductive.  But you're not making any sense when you talk about being "locked in," figuratively or otherwise.  Going out (for hiccups or whatever other reason) and being unable to re-enter is being locked out, which is a whole other thing.
Logged

People who do not understand numbers should not be allowed to use them for anything. - DvF

MYOB.  Y enseņen bien a sus hijos.
Pages: 1 [2] 3 4
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.