College Won't Pay Up...it's now 3/4ths of the way through the course

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yemaya:
I'm teaching an online course for a non-for-profit brick-and-mortar that's on the other side of the country from me.  I taught for them one term.  They called me just days before the term started and begged me to take this course for them.  Last time, I had no problems with payment.  This term has been another story entirely.  Repeated emails and phone calls inquiring about the status of my paycheck have been ignored.  On the one hand, it's not the students' fault that their school is dishonest.  On the other hand, why should I teach this course for free?  I have plenty of other schools that are willing to give me contracts and they pay their bills.  Taking them to small claims court isn't an option because the contract specifies that any legal disputes are handled in their local jurisdiction.  It would cost me more to sue than they owe.  No doubt they are fully aware and are exploiting this.  But do I have another option beyond sucking it up and being mad that they cheated me, or telling them to go to hell and letting them deal with angry students?

mountainguy:
My immediate question . . . Have you raised holy hell about this?? I'd make a gig stink via phone and email until someone respond to you.

oldfullprof:
I think you can sue them locally because they've broken the contract, anyway.  The other way is a wage and hour claim with the state.  Warning: it took me a year to collect this way once.  But it's more sure fire than a small claims action.

yemaya:
Quote from: mountainguy on February 23, 2013,  1:26:02 AM

My immediate question . . . Have you raised holy hell about this?? I'd make a gig stink via phone and email until someone respond to you.


Oh yes.  To everyone up to the Provost.  Since there's no way I'd ever accept an assignment from them anyway, and I don't need to use them as a reference, this is a bridge I can burn.

Quote from: oldfullprof on February 23, 2013,  1:27:00 AM

I think you can sue them locally because they've broken the contract, anyway.  The other way is a wage and hour claim with the state.  Warning: it took me a year to collect this way once.  But it's more sure fire than a small claims action.


Interesting.  Can you PM me with more details? 

pigou:
You should look at the Department of Labor website in your employer's state. Unpaid wages is taken rather seriously.

If you decide to bring suit yourself, forget about small claims. In "real" court, you can claim your owed wages plus an equal amount as penalty (plus attorney and court fees) - all under the Fair Labor Standards Act.

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