Bang Your Head on Your Desk - the thread of teaching despair!

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mickeymantle:

I'm with you, West Coast.  One must be careful with email addresses, particularly with FERPA and other confidentiality requirements.  The days of posting grades with SSNs, for example, are long over!

blackadder:
Quote from: dr_alcott on April 22, 2013,  2:28:07 PM

Quote from: dr_alcott on April 21, 2013,  1:52:11 PM

So last week, before the big paper was due, I gave the following reminders, among others:
--Don't use Wikipedia. (Good discussion followed.)
--Don't open your paper with a definition of [x, y, or z]. This is a crutch--unless you are trying to redefine something or call attention to an alternative usage. (Good discussion followed.)
--When you use someone else's words, use quotation marks and cite your source. (Specific examples followed.)

So naturally, one of my students opened her paper with a definition of x, plagiarized from Wikipedia.


Update: This morning I met with the Student with the Bad Introduction, and we had a conversation that went sort of like this:

Me:  Last week I told you NOT to do [this].
SBI: Yeah.
Me: And I also told you NOT to do [this] or [this].
SBI: Yeah.
Me: Yet you did it.
Student: [shrug]
Me: Why?
Student: Because I'd already written it [in a draft]!
Me: [stunned silence]  . . . And it didn't occur to you to change it before you turned it in? You preferred to turn in something that you knew had all these problems, that you knew I'd catch?
Student: [shrug]


Wow...that's a whole lot of apathy on that student's part. I hope that doesn't carry over to whatever job that person gets.

cc_alan:
Quote from: blackadder on April 22, 2013,  3:55:34 PM

Quote from: dr_alcott on April 22, 2013,  2:28:07 PM

Quote from: dr_alcott on April 21, 2013,  1:52:11 PM

So last week, before the big paper was due, I gave the following reminders, among others:
--Don't use Wikipedia. (Good discussion followed.)
--Don't open your paper with a definition of [x, y, or z]. This is a crutch--unless you are trying to redefine something or call attention to an alternative usage. (Good discussion followed.)
--When you use someone else's words, use quotation marks and cite your source. (Specific examples followed.)

So naturally, one of my students opened her paper with a definition of x, plagiarized from Wikipedia.


Update: This morning I met with the Student with the Bad Introduction, and we had a conversation that went sort of like this:

Me:  Last week I told you NOT to do [this].
SBI: Yeah.
Me: And I also told you NOT to do [this] or [this].
SBI: Yeah.
Me: Yet you did it.
Student: [shrug]
Me: Why?
Student: Because I'd already written it [in a draft]!
Me: [stunned silence]  . . . And it didn't occur to you to change it before you turned it in? You preferred to turn in something that you knew had all these problems, that you knew I'd catch?
Student: [shrug]


Wow...that's a whole lot of apathy on that student's part. I hope that doesn't carry over to whatever job that person gets.


Eh... whatever.

<insert Zambronicorns here>

Alan

krisanthe:
I just posted grades for my online class this semester.  One student earned a 16%.  It's a record low for any of my classes.

I cannot care more than they do.  I cannot care more than they do...

cc_alan:
Quote from: krisanthe on April 23, 2013, 10:58:57 AM

I just posted grades for my online class this semester.  One student earned a 16%.  It's a record low for any of my classes.

I cannot care more than they do.  I cannot care more than they do...


I bet you put more effort into grading and then calculating that 16% than the student put into earning it.

Alan

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