"Favorite" conversations with students

<< < (1491/1786) > >>

geoteo:
When my students start this kind of argument, I remind them that their job is to make it easy for me to record a good grade for them, and failing to follow directions does not accomplish that goal.

polly_mer:
Quote from: geoteo on March 28, 2013,  8:22:06 AM

When my students start this kind of argument, I remind them that their job is to make it easy for me to record a good grade for them, and failing to follow directions does not accomplish that goal.


Depending on how much a particular student pulls this, I sometimes start going to "You can do anything you like short of wrecking the equipment or criminal acts.  However, the grade is based on how closely what is submitted adheres to the instructions and the level of detail expected from being this far into the unit.  Not following the instructions means I have an easy time grading, but you probably won't like the result."

lucero:
I've found it helps to say "If this were a job, what would your boss do?" The students seem to get if boss tells them to do X, they better do X and not Y, if they want to get paid and keep the job. Follow up with "we are helping you to get prepared for life after school, so this is practice for that job."

dr_alcott:
Quote from: lucero on March 28, 2013, 10:21:56 AM

I've found it helps to say "If this were a job, what would your boss do?" The students seem to get if boss tells them to do X, they better do X and not Y, if they want to get paid and keep the job. Follow up with "we are helping you to get prepared for life after school, so this is practice for that job."


This reminds me of a conversation I once had with a student like Lizzy's who decided to do Y instead of X. I told the student that my boss wanted a report on X, but I did Y instead, because it didn't matter much what my boss wanted; what really mattered was what I wanted. I asked the student what she expected my boss to say. A light bulb went on.

lizzy:
Quote from: dr_alcott on March 28, 2013, 10:25:05 AM

Quote from: lucero on March 28, 2013, 10:21:56 AM

I've found it helps to say "If this were a job, what would your boss do?" The students seem to get if boss tells them to do X, they better do X and not Y, if they want to get paid and keep the job. Follow up with "we are helping you to get prepared for life after school, so this is practice for that job."


This reminds me of a conversation I once had with a student like Lizzy's who decided to do Y instead of X. I told the student that my boss wanted a report on X, but I did Y instead, because it didn't matter much what my boss wanted; what really mattered was what I wanted. I asked the student what she expected my boss to say. A light bulb went on.


I should have put it in boss/employee terms. I had already explained why X was necessary, given our course objectives. I bet the job model would have been more persuasive.

Who knows with this student, though. She probably would have told me that she's my boss, since her parents pay my salary.

She comes in with her own ideas about how things should go, and it's almost impossible to dislodge her. For instance, I've explained to her at least three times why the "5 paragraph essay" model won't work with an eight page paper. 

She is still not convinced.

Navigation

[0] Message Index

[#] Next page

[*] Previous page