• November 1, 2014
November 01, 2014, 5:44:55 AM *
Welcome, Guest. Please login or register.

Login with your Chronicle username and password
News: For all you tweeters, follow The Chronicle on Twitter.
 
Pages: 1 ... 16 17 [18] 19 20 21
  Print  
Author Topic: Working at Korean Universities -- Warning  (Read 182035 times)
sejong
New member
*
Posts: 12


« Reply #255 on: February 28, 2011, 11:45:03 AM »

For your further reading entertainment on the Korean academic world, here are a couple of slightly related articles that have recently appeared in the Korean media:

1) “Prof. Kim In-hye of SNU fired for violence”

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2011/02/117_82223.html

2) “Disgraced Cloning Scientist Had High Hopes for Libya Contract”

http://english.chosun.com/site/data/html_dir/2011/02/28/2011022801431.html
Logged
kukom
Junior member
**
Posts: 87


« Reply #256 on: March 01, 2011, 5:12:31 AM »

The following article is also highly relevant to the matter at hand and is also a very good read. It's once again by David McNeill of The Chronicle of Higher Education:

June 19, 2009
South Korea Moves to Make Its Universities More International
But skeptics say internationalization efforts are bound to fail without growth in research
By David McNeill

http://chronicle.com/article/South-Korea-Powers-Ahead-With/44530/

Logged
kukom
Junior member
**
Posts: 87


« Reply #257 on: March 01, 2011, 5:38:41 AM »

Essentially, the bottom line is that if South Kotean universities fail to have foreign faculty fully integrated into the ranks of the Korean faculty, then this whole business for local univs to internationalize will fall dead on its face. That is to say, faculty meetings must be held in the medium of English and research funding must be made readily available for foreign researchers on a timely basis just to name few necessary steps Korean univs MUST take. Moreover, it's vital that exclusivism and marginalization based on cultural barriers must stop immediately, both in the case of foreign students and foreign faculty alike. The whole excuse that "We are Korean and thus you can't possibly understand how things work in Korea." must be done away with once and for all. Otherwise there is no point in inviting foreign faculty to any Korean university to begin with. All things considered the segregation of foreigners at Korean univs must be made to come to a full and permanent stop.
Logged
kukom
Junior member
**
Posts: 87


« Reply #258 on: March 01, 2011, 6:05:38 AM »

Kotean=Korean
Logged
sejong
New member
*
Posts: 12


« Reply #259 on: March 02, 2011, 6:57:20 AM »

This article is also interesting (recently posted in a thread on Dave's ESL Cafe):

http://forums.eslcafe.com/korea/viewtopic.php?t=201633

"Successful integration of foreign faculty into Korean universities: A proposed framework"

http://competency.snu.ac.kr/pds/2009research/lynnilon09_1.pdf
Logged
sejong
New member
*
Posts: 12


« Reply #260 on: March 02, 2011, 8:39:37 AM »

I do not have access to the article on "South Korea Brings in Foreign Professors by the Thousands — at a Cost". However, I hope the author made a distinction between difficulties in adapting to Korean teaching culture (e.g., academic inflation in terms of degrees, lack of creative and critical thinking, lack of classroom participation, and so on), difficulties in adapting to Korean research culture (e.g., unquestioned authority and uninformed decision-taking, academic inflation in terms of non-substantial papers and domestic prizes, short-term thinking, lack of understanding of the difference between engineering/development and research, lack of research integrity, micromanagement, and so on), and difficulties in adapting to Korean culture as encountered in daily life (e.g., different food, different language, lack of personal space, and so on).
Logged
kukom
Junior member
**
Posts: 87


« Reply #261 on: March 03, 2011, 1:27:32 AM »

The reason why it's so difficult working in Korea (even at a Korean university) is largely due to the deeply rooted prejudice which is ingrained in South Korean society at all levels; on an individual level; within institutions; by all levels of government (local and national); in the mass media; by local and national officials.

Simply put, this causes foreigners great difficulty since prejudice isn't seen as a negative aspect of Korea by Koreans. In fact, Koreans rarely acknowledge that prejudice even exists within Korea, and in the case of those who do acknowledge that it exists, they simply have little inclination to do anything about it, for two basic reasons:

1) It doesn't affect them in any way, shape or form.
2) They know it's so much a part of Korean society that there is simply no method or tool to extract it from the fiber of the Korean 'people' as a whole.

Make no mistake, If you plan on coming to work in Korea, you will not be accepted in any Korean circle, professional or otherwise. This is simply due to your appearance and even if you have a Korean heritage, cultural reasons will be brought up to exclude you from any tight group. Any inclusion is bound to be purely superficial.

I don't mean to be the bearer of unfavorable news, but I simply don't see how and when Korean society is to change in the foreseeable future.
Logged
kukom
Junior member
**
Posts: 87


« Reply #262 on: March 03, 2011, 6:54:01 AM »

In the article 'South Korea Brings in Foreign Professors by the Thousands-at a Cost' (by David McNeill) published by the Chronicle (February 27, 2011), Mun Sang Kim, director of the Advanced Robotics Research Center at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology asserts that there are "moral problems" when it comes to foreigners.
He furher adds that "There are some problems and some accidents in hiring native speakers at the schools right now," ... "For example, the immigration system in Korea is not good enough to examine whether the foreign visitors are clean or not, or they did some crime," ... "That's the reason why the government thinks about such robot systems. They don't have any such social problems, they don't do the drugs."

These kinds of statements are highly problematic on several levels. Not only are they vile and filled with prejudice, they are unfounded and tend to be mirrored by not only common Koreans but also by government officials. Read the article Linked below to give just grounds to my words:

https://sites.google.com/site/southkoreaneducation/the-foreign-english-teacher-in-south-korea---truths-and-myths

If this kind of prejudice is allowed to stand, foreigners in Korea will continue to be looked down on by all sectors of Korean society and no matter what walk of life you happen to be in as aforeigner (residing in South Korea), life will certainly prove to be difficult, even while working at a Korean university.

Logged
csguy
Distinguished Senior Member
*****
Posts: 1,278

Computer Science faculty


« Reply #263 on: March 03, 2011, 8:23:04 AM »

In the article 'South Korea Brings in Foreign Professors by the Thousands-at a Cost' (by David McNeill) published by the Chronicle (February 27, 2011), Mun Sang Kim, director of the Advanced Robotics Research Center at the Korea Institute of Science and Technology asserts that there are "moral problems" when it comes to foreigners.
He furher adds that "There are some problems and some accidents in hiring native speakers at the schools right now," ... "For example, the immigration system in Korea is not good enough to examine whether the foreign visitors are clean or not, or they did some crime," ... "That's the reason why the government thinks about such robot systems. They don't have any such social problems, they don't do the drugs."

I did find that quite disturbing. Here is a researcher successfully playing on xenophobia to obtain funding for his robotics work. From what I have seen the robots themselves are not impressive. They seem to be primarily used as fancy remote controlled webcams. This may be cheaper than actually bringing the operators (a Filipina in the video I saw) to Korea but it would probably be cheaper still just to use a webcam.
Logged
kukom
Junior member
**
Posts: 87


« Reply #264 on: March 03, 2011, 7:07:33 PM »

What's even more disturbing is thaw this fella still has a job. Institutions where prejudice is not condoned would have fired the guy by now. At the very least had him resign. This is what sets Western research institutes apart from Korean ones and this is the smoking gun proof that prejudice does exist in the academic world in South Korea even if Koreans say otherwise as is the case in the above mentioned article. Under normal circumstances this fella would be out of a job by now, at least in the US. And this is one of the reasons why American univs are well ahead of the pack (due to the survey component of THE Thomson Reuters methodology). Xenophobia really hurts Korean university rankings in the end. This is what they still fail to realize. Globalization with nationalism in mind.
Logged
kukom
Junior member
**
Posts: 87


« Reply #265 on: March 03, 2011, 11:53:09 PM »

Must read article:

Ethnic pride source of prejudice, discrimination
Blood-based ethnic national identity has hindered cultural and social diversity in Korea, experts say
Appeared in The Korea Herald, August 2, 2006
August 2, 2006
Gi-Wook Shin - Director at Shorenstein Asia Pacific Research Center

http://aparc.stanford.edu/news/koreas_ethnic_nationalism_is_a_source_of_both_pride_and_prejudice_according_to_giwook_shin_20060802/
Logged
kukom
Junior member
**
Posts: 87


« Reply #266 on: March 04, 2011, 1:00:31 AM »

Here is the link to the Full Article:

The Chronicle of Higher Education
February 27, 2011
South Korea Brings in Foreign Professors by the Thousands —at a Cost
By David McNeill

http://viet-studies.info/SouthKorea_ForeignProf_CHE.pdf
Logged
sejong
New member
*
Posts: 12


« Reply #267 on: March 08, 2011, 6:59:29 AM »

To provide some perspective, the articles below show that Korean academics are also struggling with certain aspects of the academic culture in Korea (corruption, ghostwriting, unrealistic expectations):

“Lecturer’s suicide rocks university”

http://joongangdaily.joins.com/article/view.asp?aid=2921114

“Sogang Univ. Physicist Jumps to His Death Under Work Pressure”

http://www.koreatimes.co.kr/www/news/nation/2010/09/113_61450.html
Logged
olddrone
Junior member
**
Posts: 55


« Reply #268 on: March 21, 2011, 5:22:06 PM »

Yes, indeed, you are unable to see the beam in your own eye yet pick on the moat in others!

The reason why it's so difficult working in America (even at an all-white American university) is largely due to the deeply rooted prejudice which is ingrained in American society at all levels; on an individual level; within institutions; by all levels of government (local and national); in the mass media; by local and federal officials.

Simply put, this causes foreigners (called aliens, meaning non-whites, euphemistically) great difficulty since prejudice isn't seen as a negative aspect of American by most white Americans. In fact, white Americans rarely acknowledge that prejudice even exists within the United States, and in the case of those who do acknowledge that it exists, they simply have little inclination to do anything about it, for two basic reasons:

1) It doesn't affect them in any way, shape or form.
2) They know it's so much a part of American society that there is simply no method or tool to extract it from the fiber of the American 'people' as a whole.

Make no mistake, If you plan on coming to work in America, you will not be accepted in any American circle, professional or otherwise. This is simply due to your appearance and even if you have an American heritage, cultural reasons will be brought up to exclude you from any tight group. Any inclusion is bound to be purely superficial.

I don't mean to be the bearer of unfavorable news, but I simply don't see how and when American society is to change in the foreseeable future

Ditto!
Logged
sejong
New member
*
Posts: 12


« Reply #269 on: March 22, 2011, 2:11:49 AM »

Olddrone, I am not sure whether your analogy is appropriate. Are you for instance aware of the following article?

"More Foreign-Born Scholars Lead U.S. Universities"
By LISA W. FODERARO
Published: March 9, 2011

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/03/10/education/10presidents.html
Logged
Pages: 1 ... 16 17 [18] 19 20 21
  Print  
 
Jump to:  

Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.9 | SMF © 2006-2008, Simple Machines LLC Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!
  • 1255 Twenty-Third St., N.W.
  • Washington, D.C. 20037
subscribe today

Get the insight you need for success in academe.