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Author Topic: Funny things said by non-academics  (Read 98827 times)
annmarie
Finally a
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« Reply #225 on: September 28, 2007, 7:07:25 PM »

I get angrier when graduate students who display profound ignorance than I get when non-academics show their ignorance.  Some of the "graduate students" do very little literature review for their theses and dissertations.  Some do not have much, if any. math background.  Science is like a foreign language to them.  Some work in one academic area, and do not even know the words to describe the subdivisions in an adjacent academic area. 

The most annoying thing about all this is that these profoundly ignorant students think that they are "hot stuff".
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elsie
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« Reply #226 on: September 28, 2007, 7:10:51 PM »

I've started to have my grad students do a lit review for my course in order to prepare them for thesis level work. They really struggle with it, but I push it hard.
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"People assume that time is a strict progression from cause to effect. But actually, from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint, it's more like a big ball of wibbly-wobbly timey-wimey stuff." - the Doctor
ploughandstars
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« Reply #227 on: October 21, 2007, 5:22:09 PM »

I live in a village of 1700 people or so in rural Connecticut. The village has had a school since 1638 and I used to answer "So what do you do for a living?" with "I'm a school teacher". Not lately as that has often led to, "Would you get First Selectman __________ to call me about our taxes?" Now, I just answer, "I'm retired, how are you doing?"   
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kaysixteen
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« Reply #228 on: October 22, 2007, 10:58:29 AM »

Why do the villagers think that a lowly schoolmarm would have any influence with HM the First Selectman anyhow?
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daffy
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« Reply #229 on: October 23, 2007, 11:21:39 AM »

I've noticed that a few posters seem to use number of books owned as a proxy for how avid a reader someone is. 

Some folks are serious book lovers but make frequent use of the public library, rather than feeling the need to purchase every single book they read so that it can sit on a shelf afterwards.

Sometimes when I walk into an overly book-filled house, I feel like the residents are trying to impress me with all of their books.  The same way that less-academically inclined people might try to impress others with a fancy car or oversized house.
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comp_queen
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The Young Fogey Boring Suburban Forumite


« Reply #230 on: October 23, 2007, 4:45:29 PM »

I've noticed that a few posters seem to use number of books owned as a proxy for how avid a reader someone is. 

Some folks are serious book lovers but make frequent use of the public library, rather than feeling the need to purchase every single book they read so that it can sit on a shelf afterwards.

Sometimes when I walk into an overly book-filled house, I feel like the residents are trying to impress me with all of their books.  The same way that less-academically inclined people might try to impress others with a fancy car or oversized house.

There's a point to that.  But I buy my books because I know I'm going to write in them, I know I'm going to re-read them, and I know I'm going to want them around.  They make me happy.
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elsie
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« Reply #231 on: October 23, 2007, 4:56:50 PM »

I agree with comp_queen's reasons. I would add that the problem with libraries is that they want their books back sooner than I'm ready to give them back.
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"People assume that time is a strict progression from cause to effect. But actually, from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint, it's more like a big ball of wibbly-wobbly timey-wimey stuff." - the Doctor
merce
strange attractor
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« Reply #232 on: October 23, 2007, 4:57:41 PM »

Actually, funny the book-buying should come up now.

I just decided I am financially unable to continue my current book-buying diet. I need to stop.

I thought last night, "hey! I can just read books from the library. Duh!" Then awoke to find a flurry of emails about library books being overdue and needing to be returned promptly.  I haven't even cracked a single one of them open yet!  Library works if you have a great one available to you. Even as faculty here at a decent U with a decent library I still can't really count on the library getting me anything I want to really "read."  I guess I will invest in that B&N frequent indulger card after all. I'm also keeping amazon afloat with my purchases alone I'm sure.
alas.
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spammer 
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infopri
I guess I'm now a VERY
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When all else fails, let us agree to disagree.


« Reply #233 on: October 23, 2007, 5:36:23 PM »

I guess I will invest in that B&N frequent indulger card after all. I'm also keeping amazon afloat with my purchases alone I'm sure.
alas.

I have one of those B&N cards, which has to be renewed (by paying a $25 fee) each year.  Once, I renewed the card in front of my husband.  Shocked at the fee, he pointed out that, with the card's 10 percent discount on transactions, I'd "have to buy $250 worth of merchandise within a year, just to break even!"

Yeah, and...?  What's the problem?  (Hell, if I were to allow myself, I could spend that much in a single day!)
« Last Edit: October 23, 2007, 5:37:10 PM by infopri » Logged

People who do not understand numbers should not be allowed to use them for anything. - DvF

MYOB.  Y enseņen bien a sus hijos.
dr_prephd
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« Reply #234 on: October 23, 2007, 6:35:20 PM »

I've noticed that a few posters seem to use number of books owned as a proxy for how avid a reader someone is. 

Some folks are serious book lovers but make frequent use of the public library, rather than feeling the need to purchase every single book they read so that it can sit on a shelf afterwards.

Sometimes when I walk into an overly book-filled house, I feel like the residents are trying to impress me with all of their books.  The same way that less-academically inclined people might try to impress others with a fancy car or oversized house.

There's a point to that.  But I buy my books because I know I'm going to write in them, I know I'm going to re-read them, and I know I'm going to want them around.  They make me happy.

Well, sure, but even then, there are books that I don't want to pay for. $100 for a textbook? Sure. $15 for a lousy paperback that I buy to put myself to sleep on vacation? Nope.
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elsie
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Posts: 3,855


« Reply #235 on: October 23, 2007, 7:29:16 PM »

I've become an obsessive manga addict. Between that and the other books I buy at B&N, the card ends up paying for itself, even if it does take that much to make it pay.
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"People assume that time is a strict progression from cause to effect. But actually, from a non-linear, non-subjective viewpoint, it's more like a big ball of wibbly-wobbly timey-wimey stuff." - the Doctor
anon67
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Posts: 28


« Reply #236 on: October 23, 2007, 9:09:14 PM »

When I was finiishing up my diss, the family wanted to know how long does it really take to write a paper. 

Now that I am finished, my mother wants to know why I can't finish that simple paper so that I can be done with homework and start working a job.

My neighbor wants to know when my vacation starts so that we can spend leisurely days drinking coffee and such.

They all think I am a loser...well...
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mdwlark
hardly a
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« Reply #237 on: October 24, 2007, 10:51:31 AM »

I agree with comp_queen's reasons. I would add that the problem with libraries is that they want their books back sooner than I'm ready to give them back.

When I was in my doctoral program, one of the librarians came out of the back office and chewed me out at the front desk in front of everyone around, saying I had the worst record for overdue books of any patron of the library.   After she completed the tongue lashing and retreated back into her office, one of the library assistants said to me, "Actually, I think that says good things about you."   

I guess that is really a fun thing said by an academic.
« Last Edit: October 24, 2007, 10:52:16 AM by mdwlark » Logged
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