Science Fiction in Science Class

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geonerd:
If you're willing to take some of the bad, there are lots of possibilities in Star Trek: warp drive, transporters, food synthesizer, tractor beam, holodeck, sub-space communications.

polly_mer:
In case other people were looking for suggestions on this topic, I've received via PM James Kakalios' book The Physics of Superheroes.  The relevant website is http://www.physicsofsuperheroes.com/

Quote from: geonerd on January 03, 2013,  6:49:22 PM

If you're willing to take some of the bad, there are lots of possibilities in Star Trek: warp drive, transporters, food synthesizer, tractor beam, holodeck, sub-space communications.


Oh, I'm definitely looking for both good and bad.  Why can't we have warp drive (doggone relativity)?  What's wrong with transporters if we can do quantum entanglement?  (I'm using Timeline to mention the problems that everyone can understand even though that's time travel).

chaosbydesign:
What about the use of 'artificial gravity' in all of the sci-fi spaceships I can think of?

elsie:
Alternate universes?

msparticularity:
When I high school I was teamed with English and science colleagues; I taught the "history of" a lot of science topics while teaching early modern and modern history. In addition to the stuff like you're talking about using (which my colleagues did in their classes) I also used excerpts from Bill Bryson's Short History of Nearly Everythng. My students always wondered who sat around and thought this stuff up, and often the answer is--some pretty weird people, and fairly often the discovery was accidental, triggered by something else they were working on.

Mostly, though, I think you probably want Walter Lewin--NYT article and links to some videos here.

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