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Author Topic: Professors w/ PhDs from Asian universities  (Read 59625 times)
attar1297
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« Reply #45 on: March 09, 2011, 2:35:25 PM »

At lower ranked schools they might ignore applications from the US and they certainly don't advertise there.

Thank you for responding Totoro :-)

Did you mean the lower ranked schools in Australia? My school is actually at the middle or (probably) bottom of tier 2 and is more famous for its medical school, arts, and psychology. Although it is at the lower rank of tier 2, it is actually listed as an R1 university by the U.S. Carnegie Classifications (I personally believe that this is primarily due to the medical school). The rank might improve in couple of years from now though.

As I have stated earlier, I'm thinking to attend several academic conferences in my field in Australia and start networking from there. I know it might sound naive but none of the professors in my school has any correspondence with professors in Australia. So I figure this should begin with my own initiative. My field is actually business information systems. I'm seeing that U. of South Australia, U. of Queensland, Charles Sturt U., U. of Wollongong, UNSW, and U. of Sydney have a pretty solid business information systems department. And yes, based on the faculty profiles, they don't seem to be demanding as to hire only those with U.S. Ph.D.s from R1 or the Ivy League.

What discourage me from finding an academic job in Singapore is that they seem to hire only those with Ph.D.s from the U.S. Ivy League, the U.S. R1, or the U.K. OxBridge. At least that's the case in my field (I browsed the faculty profiles in my field at NUS, Nanyang Tech, and Singapore Management U.). Besides, I am married with a child and am expecting a second one, and we want to stay permanently either in Singapore or in Australia. There is a strict requirement to place a child in K-12 local schools in Singapore. Since we do not have any relative in Singapore, we need to volunteer in a Parent Volunteer Program at a local school in Singapore by the time the child we want to enroll to is 4 years old. And there is a time lag where we would be expats while waiting for our PR to be issued. In Singapore, expats can't enroll their children to local schools while Singapore citizens and PRs are not allowed to enroll their children to international schools, which are very expensive. And it seems to me that this is not the case with K-12 education system in Australia (although tuition fee for expat children in Australia is higher than children with Australian citizenship or PR). Well, I did a lot of homework besides looking for a better job environment for me :-)

Maybe I should create a new thread since this is about working as a faculty in the U.S. with a Ph.D. from Asian Us.
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totoro
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« Reply #46 on: March 09, 2011, 6:12:59 PM »

At lower ranked schools they might ignore applications from the US and they certainly don't advertise there.

Thank you for responding Totoro :-)

Did you mean the lower ranked schools in Australia?

Yes.

Quote
My school is actually at the middle or (probably) bottom of tier 2 and is more famous for its medical school, arts, and psychology. Although it is at the lower rank of tier 2, it is actually listed as an R1 university by the U.S. Carnegie Classifications (I personally believe that this is primarily due to the medical school). The rank might improve in couple of years from now though.

I know what R1 is but I don't know what exactly you mean by tier 2. My guess was you were thinking of lower ranked R1 universities. The kinds of places I mentioned. i.e. not Harvard, Chicago, Berkeley, Stanford, MIT, Princeton etc. But rather BU, UWash, UCSD etc. which are all good universities of course. My office neighbors have a mix of PhDs from either of these ranks and from Oxford/Cambridge/London and very top Australian uni(s). We have a post-doc with a Tokyo PhD.

Quote
As I have stated earlier, I'm thinking to attend several academic conferences in my field in Australia and start networking from there. I know it might sound naive but none of the professors in my school has any correspondence with professors in Australia. So I figure this should begin with my own initiative. My field is actually business information systems. I'm seeing that U. of South Australia, U. of Queensland, Charles Sturt U., U. of Wollongong, UNSW, and U. of Sydney have a pretty solid business information systems department. And yes, based on the faculty profiles, they don't seem to be demanding as to hire only those with U.S. Ph.D.s from R1 or the Ivy League.

UQ, USyd, and UNSW are all Group of Eight universities (our equivalent of R1). Wollongong is trying to get into the top rank (see also Griffith, UTS, QUT, Macquarie). The others you mentioned are teaching oriented schools though they have pockets of research excellence and will claim they are research universities. I bet you see a difference between the faculty at the three levels. ANU and Melbourne are the top 2 unis though that might not be true in your field (it is true for business). UTS is far ahead of Wollongong in Business. You should check computer science and business in this:

http://www.arc.gov.au/era/outcomes_2010.htm

Quote
What discourage me from finding an academic job in Singapore is that they seem to hire only those with Ph.D.s from the U.S. Ivy League, the U.S. R1, or the U.K. OxBridge.

This is why I like to say "ANU is the top university in the Southern Hemisphere. Remember that Singapore is in the Northern Hemisphere" :)


Quote
At least that's the case in my field (I browsed the faculty profiles in my field at NUS, Nanyang Tech, and Singapore Management U.). Besides, I am married with a child and am expecting a second one, and we want to stay permanently either in Singapore or in Australia. There is a strict requirement to place a child in K-12 local schools in Singapore. Since we do not have any relative in Singapore, we need to volunteer in a Parent Volunteer Program at a local school in Singapore by the time the child we want to enroll to is 4 years old. And there is a time lag where we would be expats while waiting for our PR to be issued. In Singapore, expats can't enroll their children to local schools while Singapore citizens and PRs are not allowed to enroll their children to international schools, which are very expensive. And it seems to me that this is not the case with K-12 education system in Australia (although tuition fee for expat children in Australia is higher than children with Australian citizenship or PR). Well, I did a lot of homework besides looking for a better job environment for me :-).

Well, I don't know anything about this. You can become an Australian citizen in 4 years and a permanent resident before that. I doubt there is any tuition fee at Australian public schools if you are here for a job in Australia.
« Last Edit: March 09, 2011, 6:14:35 PM by totoro » Logged
aprilmay
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« Reply #47 on: March 09, 2011, 7:51:16 PM »

Everything matters - publications (quantity and quality), and the doctoral institution (overall and within your field). There are many programs in Korean universities that are quite well regarded in other parts of the world, so do not be too discouraged. If you want to work in the U.S., publish in English journals. Go for a U.S. postdoc. I do not think this is impossible at all. Good luck.

In relation to some of the other posts, I agree that the issue with Ph.Ds from different parts of the world is not just some type of U.S. snobbery. Different countries have different types of degrees. Some Australian schools don't require a single class for a Ph.D., which would be unheard of at a top U.S. school. For some fields a U.S. Ph.D. implies a longer period of study than a U.K. Ph.D.  Too many job seekers wonder why they aren't getting top offers, but treati all doctoral degrees as equivalent, although SCs will surely differentiate. There will be even more variety as online Ph.D.s become more common.

All aspriing faculty should know that most faculty teach at a school that is the same rank or a lower rank than the school where they conducted their doctoral studies. So the higher rank the school, the more options out of the starting gate. As the time after graduaton grows, the Ph.D. school will still be important, but less so. If someone is from a regional university in another country, it will be difficult, at least at first.
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teresae
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« Reply #48 on: November 13, 2012, 10:01:57 AM »


In relation to some of the other posts, I agree that the issue with Ph.Ds from different parts of the world is not just some type of U.S. snobbery. Different countries have different types of degrees. Some Australian schools don't require a single class for a Ph.D., which would be unheard of at a top U.S. school. For some fields a U.S. Ph.D. implies a longer period of study than a U.K. Ph.D.  Too many job seekers wonder why they aren't getting top offers, but treati all doctoral degrees as equivalent, although SCs will surely differentiate. There will be even more variety as online Ph.D.s become more common.

All aspriing faculty should know that most faculty teach at a school that is the same rank or a lower rank than the school where they conducted their doctoral studies. So the higher rank the school, the more options out of the starting gate. As the time after graduaton grows, the Ph.D. school will still be important, but less so. If someone is from a regional university in another country, it will be difficult, at least at first.

Yes, it makes sense for it to be this way. There is a very clear difference in standard in ph.D's obtained from different countries, and different educational institutions within those countries. It's definitely something to consider both when deciding which educational institution to continue your studies at, and when tailoring your expectations after graduation.
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